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WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY • 1871-1991 



Gymnastic Circuses 

Dance Festivals 
Athletic Exhibitions 




Athletic Exhibitions 



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Gymnastic Circuses 



Dance Festivals 



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Gymnastic Circuses 

Dance Festivals 
Athletic Exhibitions 

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY 

1871-1991 



"Whosoever labor for their livelihood and gain have 
no share at all in nobility or gentry as painters, 
stageplayers, tumblers, ordinary fiddlers, innkeep- 
ers, fencers, jugglers, dancers, mountebanks, bear 
keepers and the like." 

"The Compleat Gentleman" 
Henry Peacham, 1622 






DR. RUSSELL L. STURZEBECKER 

1993 



© 1993 by RUSSELL L. STURZEBECKER 
FIRST EDITION— FIRST PRINTING 



All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any 
retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, chemical, 
mechanical, optical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission 
of the copyright owner with the exception of reviewers who prepare a review for 
a periodical, newspaper, radio, television, or other public communication media. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMBER 92-90908 

ISBN 09600466^-X 

Printed in the United States of America 



Published By 

RUSSELL L. STURZEBECKER 

503 OWEN ROAD 

WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 19380 



Cover Illustrations: Clowns in 1954, The Circus. Clowns left To right: Wally Crosson, 
Charley Way, Alex Neiman, Al Daniels, Bob Kautter, Shelley Saffern, John Duff. 



Printing By 
KNA PRESS INC., KENNETT SQUARE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Binding By 
HOSTER BINDERY INC., IVYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA 



Ul 



* 



• 



Dedication 



* 



* 



This book is dedicated to those alumni and students who, facing the ultimate, discovered fear, courage 
and death. Here they studied; they walked with us on the campus; they were a part of us. We must not 
forget them - for their gift of the future and of freedom. R. L. S. 

WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

••To live in hearts we leave behind 
Is not to die." 

Ladr Ira E.. Sergeant. Machine Gun 
Co. 4 th Infantry. A. E. F.. France. 

ChlSS Of 1913 



WORLD WAR I 1917-1918 

Class Date of Death Service 

D. Elmer Fickes 191 1 9-25-18 Army 

C. Justise Criswell 1913 9. -18 Army 

Ira E. Lady 1913 1 1-20-18 Army 

WORLD WAR II 1941 - 1945 

Class Date of Death Service 

Anderson, Robert L. 1936 3-11-44 Air Corps 

Bellow, Louis W. [1945] 8-10-44 Army 

Blackburn, George N. 1939 4- 7-41 Navy 

Buckley, Richard M. 1943 1-15-45 Air Corps 

DiFranks, Joseph [1943] 7-19-43 Air Corps 

Durning, Robert P. [1946] 11-20-44 Army 

Eberly, Alan W. [1945] 11-16-44 Army 

Eubank, John 1939 2- 9-45 Air Corps 

Gantt, William L. [1948] 2- 2-45 Marines 

Gere, Ernest J. [1942] 9-1944 Army 

Gerrits, David J. [1946] 6-1944 Air Corps 

Glass, William H. 1937 4-11-45 Army 

Grycky, John A. 1940 11- -42 Navy 

Gunderson, Edwin J. 1941 11-16-44 Army 

Henderson, Vernon 1940 12-23-44 Air Corps 

Ho fmann, Bruce 1942 4-1844 Navy 

Jordan, Howard W. 1941 1-10-43 Marines 



VIETNAM WAR 1961 - 



Giretti, Anthony Alfred 



Each year some dear familiar face 
To memories keeping we consign 
Each year some comrade takes his place 
Among the shadows in the line. 
And thus the living ranks grow thin 
Ah, few must be the years at most 
Before we all are mustered in 
To Serve among the silent host. 

AN UNKNOWN CHESTER COUNTY CIVIL WAR POET 



Kautz, Raymond S. 1935 1-1345 
Keating, Harland B. 1941 12-3045 
Laffel, Gustave S. 1933 11- 144 
Levinsky, Stanley M.[ 1946] 1-1145 
Loercher, Charles H.[ 1943] 6-1644 
Lynch, Joseph B. [1944] 3- 843 
Maxton, William M. [1944] 12- 344 
Philips, Harlan M. 1928 8-3042 
Rogo,Clevio 1937 6-2342 

Schaeffer, Paul R. [1946] 2-1144 
Shetron, Robert L. [1943] 11-1244 
Smedley, Calvin H. 1940 7- 343 
Stauffer, Boyd W. 1941 9-1745 
Wapensky, Russell A [ 1 944] 5-2044 
Yerger, William R. [ 1 942] 8-1 245 
Zaratin , Mirand a 1937 



Army 

Air Corps 

Army 

Army 

Air Corps 

Army 

Army 

Navy 

Air Corps 

Army 

Army 

Army 

Navy 

Air Corps 

Army 

Waves 



Class 

1968 



Date of Death 

3-19-69 



Service 

Marines 



That he wk.ch hath no stomach to this fight let him depart ... We would not die in that man's 

company th.* fears his fellowship to die with us." 

H —Shakespeare, King Henry V, Act IV, Scene 3 



About the Author 



Russell L. Sturzebecker entered the military service in 
1942, serving in the United States Air Force, in New 
Guinea, the Philippine Islands and Okinawa as a member 
of the 312th Bombardment Group. 

He has served as a member of Evaluative Educational 
Teams, Consultant to the Department of Public Instruction, 
Pennsylvania, Consultant and Senior Evaluator to the 
Association of Private Camps, New York City and 
Consultant and Lecturer on Management to the United 
States Department of Defense. 

He was named delegate by the United States Olympic 
Committee to attend the International Olympic Academy 
at Olympia, Greece in the summer of 1969. He participated 
in a lecture research tour of Europe, Africa and the Middle 
East in August and September, 1970, and attended the 
International Olympic Academy sessions in Greece for the 
second year. 

He received the Honor Award in 1957 and the Elmer 
B. Cottrell Award in 1968 from the Pennsylvania State 
Association HPER. From 1955 to 1965 he promoted 
international relations by bringing to the college the 
national gymnastics teams from Sweden, West Germany, 
Finland, Denmark, Japan, the Soviet Union, Canada and 
Mexico. For these efforts in support of international 
exchange and the United States Olympic Games, he was 
cited by the Amateur Athletic Union of the United States in 
1963 and 1964. 

In 1961 he managed the United States National Men's 
and Women's Gymnastic Team tour for competition in 
Czechoslovakia, Poland and Russia. He received citations 
from both the Polish and Soviet Sports Federations. The 
Senate of Pennsylvania on August 14, 1961 presented him 
with a commendation for his work in bringing 
international sports to Pennsylvania. 

He has been a delegate to the International 



Congresses of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
and a visiting lecturer in European and Middle Eastern 
Colleges and Universities from 1967 to 1992. 

During the hundredth anniversary of the college he 
served as Centennial Chairman and Director of the new 
College Museum. He also served as Chester County 
Chairman for the Bicentennial Celebration of the American 
Independence 1776-1976. Dr. Sturzebecker was the 
recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award for 1971. 

His specialization in "Comparative Physical 
Education and Sports" as well as "Olympic Games, Ancient 
and Modern" has resulted in his services being called on as 
a speaker at the national conventions of the American 
Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
On a number of occasions he has also appeared on 
television in support of the United States Olympic teams. 
His publications include: 

Color Lithograph: Battle of Chateau Thierry, N.C. Wyeth. 

Photo Atlas Athletic-Cultural Archaeological Sites in the Greco- 
Roman World 

Roarin" 20's — Histoiy of the 312th Bombardment Group 

"Sport and Physical Education Around the World" (pp. 
577-604), Sport & Physical Education in Russia. Editor: 
W. Johnson. 

An Historical Vieiv of Women and Competitive Sports 

Centennial History of West Chester State College, 1871-1971 

Rope Jumping, Movement & Sound, Philippine National 
DanceTinikling, (Three Physical Education Motion 
Picture Films for Time-Life, Inc. 












Table of Contents 

Dedication iii 

About the Author v 

Introduction ix 

Technical Credits xiii 

Chapter I. The Beginning (1811-1871) 1 

Chapter II. West Chester State Normal School 3 

Chapter in. Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger (1890-1921) 11 

Chapter IV. Dr. Charles B. Lewis (1921-1926) 115 

Chapter V. Dr. James Bliss (1927-1930) 133 

Chapter VI. Harry R. Allen (1930-1947) 149 

Earle C. Waters (Acting 1947-1949) 

Chapter VR Dr. Russell L. Sturzebecker (1949-1966) 261 

Chapter VIII. "1967-1991" 505 



Appendix A. Chronological Listings: 

Circuses, Festivals and Exhibitions 597 

Appendix B. Bibliography — The Sources 607 



IX 



Introduction 



The author as an undergraduate Physical Education 
student from 1933 to 1937 participated in all scheduled 
gymnastic shows at West Chester. After graduation like all 
alumni who entered the teaching profession it was an 
historical devotion to promote the presentation of 
gymnastic shows, circuses and dances. Contacts were made 
with fellow alumni both men and women to share 
presentation experiences and exchange ideas. 

At the beginning of World War II the Author was on 
duty with the United States Army Air Corps at the 
technical training command Miami Beach, Florida. 
Coincidentally, the New York theater impresario, Josh 
Logan, arrived in November 1942 to direct a war fund 
raising performance of Sigmund Romberg's operetta 'The 
Desert Song". This production required the recruitment of 
a cast of performers experienced in acrobatic gymnastics. A 
review of civilian education and experiences of military 
personnel by director Logan and the Army personnel 



section at the Miami base resulted in the Author being 
given the temporary assignment to plan and direct this part 
of the operetta. 

The examination of records coupled with the 
interviewing of physical training specialists provided a 
cadre of one dozen "acrobats". Practices were scheduled 
and seamstresses assigned to make the appropriate 
"period" flowing wide striped trousers and waist bands. 

By show time the author with his troop of desert 
acrobats in black and white baggy pantaloons and dark 
makeup joined the cast to unveil director Josh Logan's 
"Desert Song", with an accompanying military orchestra. 

The Miami Civic auditorium had an over subscribed 
full house and a considerable sum of money was raised. A 
number of Hollywood movie stars of that time including 
Constance and Joan Bennett and Gilbert Roland made 
featured appearances. 

Though not within the context of this book it is 





Author rehearsing "acrobats" in costume for the "Desert Song" by Sigmund Romberg. 




^*»3a 





Cast rehearsal with Josh Logan. 



Author 
"Fort Zinderneuf", Miami 





Bob Hope, Alex Smallwood 
Bob Munstedt— 1944 



Sgt. Smallwood, Sgt. Munstedt, 
Pvt. Zelinsky 





Bob Hope 

Nadzab-Papua New Guinea 

1944 




l v>^nL JF -.1 19** n& 




's 







Sergeant Bob Munstedt and Sergeant Alex Smallwood 



significicant to note that in all theaters of the war United 
States Armed Forces' Personnel who came into the service 
with developed or latent talent gave performances on 
many occasions in the most stressful situations. 

The Author's unit— The Roarin 20s— 312th Bomb 
Group, 5th Air Force found both flying and ground 
personnel with multiple talents keeping this action alive. 

One example will of necessity represent all. Sergeant 
Bob Munstedt from Massachusetts entered the service with 
his counterpart a small wooden figure named Sergeant 
Alex Smallwood. Bob's ventriloquist act was the delight of 
not only all 5th Air Force Personnel, but also of Australian 
troops as well as the natives of Papua, New Guinea; Dutch 
New Guinea; and the Philippines. 

One must also recognize the most famous 
"Travelling" American, Bob Hope, whose appearance in 
the 312th combat area brought to a zenith the philosophy 
of entertainment for troops all over the world. Bob Hope 
included Bob Munstedt and Alex Smallwood in his 
program for the troops. 

Returning from service on 4 January 1964 the Author 



within less than one week returned to visit West Chester to 
extend greetings to his Coach Glenn Killinger and 
President Charles S. Swope. These conferences resulted in 
the author being literally "drafted" to fill in as a Physical 
Education Teacher under the direction of Harry R. Allen 
who had been his teacher and supervisor nine years earlier. 

Dr. Swope within one week, upon the 
recommendation of Dr. Killinger, invited the Author to a 
conference, During this meeting the Author was assigned 
to be a teacher and assistant coach of football as well as 
immediately revive both the gymnastic and the track and 
field teams for competition. As an after thought President 
Swope suggested that this revival movement should 
include plans for the Physical Education Department 
Circus!!! 

The 1947 Circus chronologically appears in this 
volume in the Spring of that year. This show would sadly 
turn out to be director Harry R. Allen's final tribute 
climaxing his seventeen year career. His death on campus 
six months later would in turn be a major factor in the 
writing of this book. 



XI 



President Swope directed the Author to take over Mr. 
Allen's office in the 1890 "old" gymnasium and to continue 
the senior student teaching supervision. 

In the office and within the gym ground floor were a 
number of locked storage closets which were under Mr. 
Allen's control. As frequently occurs with the passing into 
history of educational leaders such as Harry R. Allen there 
is a mandatory assessment of equipment records, files, 
documents, books, photographs, etc. Thus the decedent's 
family will be given all personal items and books. Further a 
detail of the college housekeeping staff was subsequently 
ordered to come to the old gym with a truck, report to the 
Author, and remove the contents of all storage closets for 
disposal. 

At this moment motivated by some unknown force 
the Author determined to examine all items and inventory 
same before the housekeeping team arrived. 

It was as if one pressed a Jules Verne time machine 
and returned to the past. Harry R- Allen had literally saved 
and stored all department records dating back to the 
beginning of the Normal School. All of Dr. Clyde E. 
Ehinger's files including anthropometric examinations, 
lectures, books, gymnastic show programs, photographs, 
athletic trophies, banners, antique light hand apparatus, 
and physical measuring devices were stored in cardboard 
boxes. In addition, items in similar categories from the 
service periods of Dr. Charles B. Lewis and Dr. James Bliss 
were in storage along with those relating to the deceased 
director's era 1930-1747. 

Mr. Harry R. Allen had been a trusted guardian of his 
department's past records and achievements. 

Contacts were immediately made with the supervisor 
of the housekeeping team to delay the cleaning disposal 
process. Suitable and proper emoluments were made to the 
housekeeping team to secure the time needed to meet this 
challenge. 

Miss Geraldine Conbeer (see College Centennial 
History page xi), librarian archivist, provided storage boxes 
and space in the library basement in which to place them. 

These rare and unusual primary evidences of the 
department's past literally formed the bases of this book. 
Further, Mr. Everett Shaefer, Business Manager of the 
college, from his official records storage areas supported 
the research necessary regarding the Board of Trustees 
minutes as well as those of the faculty meetings. 

Additional support was gained through successively 
placing appeals for help from alumni in the newsletter 
mailed to all living graduates of the college: 

Calling All Alumni 

To mark the occasion of the 
100th anniversary of gymnastic 
exhibitions at WCU, Dr. Russell 
Sturzebecker, retired professor emeritus, 
is preparing a rotogravure book. 
Anyone who has photos, clippings, 
programs or other memorabilia relating 
to the exhibitions is asked to contact 
him. 



Conferences with Earle C. Waters, retired faculty 
member who directed the shows from 1928-1941, were of 
significant help. Excerpts from his personal files appear in 
this volume. Faculty members Anne Schaub, Muriel Leach, 
Myra Wade, Glenn Killinger, and Charles Graham 
provided both support and first hand accounts of the time 
when they were involved with the many presentations. 

Last but equally helpful were the non-instructional 
staff including administrators, John Hollinger, Bertie 
Chambers, Tom Pitt, and Herbert Clavier, who behind the 
scenes directed their subordinate chiefs and staffs to be a 
vital part of the shows preparations. 

The technical and constructive support of the total 
college maintenance staff including housekeeping, kitchen 
personnel, carpenters, electricians, seamstresses, security, 
transportation and medical staff were a vital part of all 
programs (the Centennial History chapter eleven pp. 259- 
265 furnishes names with photos). 



Special Note to the reader 

This chronological account of all the shows presented 
by the Physical Training Department are in documentable 
form with the actual programs, newspaper and periodical 
reports exactly as written at the time. The photographs are 
original or reproduced from those taken then. 

The reader must of necessity try to "live" in that 
period of time to both understand and appreciate the 
unique features of the language, interest, and the 
complexities of life for university students, faculty and 
towns people. 

It is important to recognize that these shows were not 
limited to performers and assistants in the Physical 
Training Department. Members of other departments both 
faculty and students were either in the shows or supportive 
of the programs. 

A review of programs, news reports and photos 
reveals the rather universal participation of the music 
department. Charlotte Hardee, the director, performed 
individually and also led choruses as adjuncts to dramatic 
and dance numbers. 

The Art Faculty gave direction to the decor for 
scenery and costumes for the special requirements within 
the performances. Their names appear within the news 
reports and programs. 

The President as well as the Board of Trustees 
considered these shows to be the primary means of 
excellent public relations with the community, the state of 
Pennsylvania and the nation. Alumni attendance and 
support provided both an avenue of new students as well 
as primary information on job opportunities in their home 
areas. It was not uncommon to have every available hotel 
or rooming house filled during show week, similarly the 
listing of all public transportation to or from West Chester 
was publicized well in advance. 

These programs provided the major (and only) 
significant means of socially acceptable contact between the 
males and females who enrolled at the University. The joint 
performances established in 1898-1899 must be designated 
as the beginning of freedom on the campus. 



Xll 



Finally it is noted that in the show on 11 March 1899 
found Miss Mabel Mearns female gym captain for the girls 
leading them in their joint performance with the Men's 
Teams. 

In 1966, sixty-seven years later, Miss Mearns will 
return to open the show by presenting flowers to Cris 
Sanderson, Class of 1901, who repeated his Indian club 
routine which he had performed in his junior and senior 
year 1900 and 1901. 

In retrospect Dr. Ehinger initiated the competitive 
sports aspect as an integral part of the programs for 
students. 

By 1966 universities as well as schools motivated by 
the increasing desire for success with potential 
championships increased the number of coaching 
personnel. Then the coaching staffs in term demanded 
more exclusive training time along with increased game 
scheduling as well as off season practices. 

The student athlete literally became a single purpose 



"gladiator" specializing invariably in one sport. His life 
and living time belonged to his coach and sport. 

No longer could there be a complete student and 
faculty body dedicated to a circus Physical Education- 
dance-sports demonstrations with literally 100% 
involvement. One must also include the competitive 
growth of other student interests — music organizations, 
dramatics, debates, etc. which continue through the whole 
academic year. 

When a university grows geometrically in size the 
individual student and faculty member literally becomes 
one of many. In the university mass one can no longer be a 
part of whole intrinsic group where interrelationships with 
many students, all disciplines, and faculty are a vital part of 
the educational processes. 

It is the hope of the author that the reader "literally" 
turn the years back and vicariously assume a student or 
faculty member's role with those performers which were a 
vital part of West Chester University's history. 



xm 



Technical Credits 



The continuous research for the past forty-five years 
resulted in comprehensive original newspaper articles, 
programs, official reports, hunderds of photographs, 
periodical reviews, taped interviews with faculty leaders, 
participants, and alumni individuals who were in the 
audiences of the many performances. In chronological 
order these were placed in expandable folders to 
accommodate the varied data with accompanying visual 
material as well as the narrative titles and manuscript. 

At this point the services of Richard W. Taylor, 
President of KNA Press Inc., were brought in to direct the 
printing operation. His extensive experience along with 
that of his specialized staff proceeded to create the book. Of 
his staff he and three of his crew, Gerald Pierce, Richard 
Baccino, and Joseph Young, have printed three books and 
two reprints for the Author in the past twenty years. 

The two photographs of Richard W. Taylor and his 
eight staff members provide the reader with views of this 
uniquely qualified group whose technical individual 
specialized operations brought this volume to life. 




Left to right: Richard Taylor, Kathy Trautman, Gerald Pierce, 
Joseph Young, Debra Gallek, Richard Baccino, Edward Schork, 
Roni Camacho and Jerry Cornette. 




Once the printing of all signatures was completed, the 
KNA staff placed these in special large cartons. The next 
phase starts with the transporting of several thousand 
pounds of signatures to the bindery. 

Downey Hoster with over 40 years experience in the 
Graphic Arts Industry, who is founder and president of 
Hoster Bindery Inc. in Ivyland Pennsylvania, brought his 
staff into operation. This very complex operational area 
started with the folded signatures and sequentially each 
staff specialist brings his talents to be part of total binding 
procedures. The sewing, pasting, cutting, with attaching 
cover creations, and the multiple pressing along with 
continual inspections ends with the shrink plastic covers on 
each book followed by the packing in cartons. 

Downey and his staff since 1977 have processed the 
binding of three printings of "The Roarin 20's" as well as 
that of the first printing "The Photo Atlas of Greco-Roman 
Cultural And Athletic Archaeological Sites" for the Author. 




Left to right: Richard Taylor, Kathy Trautman, Edward Schork, 
Roni Camacho, Debra Gallek, Gerald Pierce, Richard Baccino, 
Joseph Young and Jerry Cornette. 



Front row, left to right: B.J. Hollingsworth, Downey D. Hoster 
Jr., Kathryn H. Allendorfer, Norma Hoster, Downey D. Hoster, 
Anup Joshi and Amy Haviland. Back row, left to right: Susan 
Kelly, Steve Mahnke, Dave Goudy and Chip Hollars. 



William Dean Buffington 

Bill was born 27 August 1924 on Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. His family moved to West Chester where he 
attended the public schools graduating in 1942 

He entered the service in World War II serving in the 
U.S. Navy at an advance amphibious base in Fowey, 
Cornwall England as well as aboard PC. 617 operating 
from Le Havre, France, 1943-1946. 

As a post-war veteran he attended West Chester State 
Teachers College in the Health and Physical Education 
Program receiving his B.S. degree in 1950. By 1954 he 



XIV 




Bill Buffington 

U.S. Navy 
World War II 



Bill Buffington 



received his M.Ed degree in Elementary Educational 
Administration. 

His extensive professional career has covered all 
levels of education from elementary through university. He 
has been Administrative Elementary Principal in a number 
of school districts. At the same time he was active in the 
professional and veterans' organizations. 

He has been a key figure in the veterans' Patrol Craft 
Sailors Association serving as national newsletter editor as 
well as designing the logo for the group. 

He has studied in the field of cartooning and has been 
widely recognized as a leader on the topical cartooning 
field. 

The Author has continually used Bill's talents in his 
publications. The Centennial History of West Chester State 
College, 1871-1971, has an excellent "library" of Buffington 
cartoons (selected ones appear in this volume). 

The front and back end papers furnish the reader 
with a range of Bill's cartooning talents. These portray Bill's 
knowledge not only of his participation in these shows but 
also his translating the performers and their movements to 
the art page for the reader to be a vicarious patron of the 
event. 

A closing note: Bill was the Author's student in a 
number of courses as well as being a participant in his 
college career on the "Raiders" Football Team serving as 
captain in his senior year. 

The Author always has and always will be an 
aficionado collector of Buffington cartoons. 



Ayres Unger 

He was born 6 July 1913 in Rahway, New Jersey of 
parents who had extensive successful careers as teachers of 
physical education. After completing his high school 
courses at Ocean City, New Jersey, he enrolled in Drexel 



University, Philadelphia and completed his B.S. degree in 
Electrical Engineering. He had also been enrolled in both 
C.M.T.C. and R.O.T.C programs during his college career. 

Ayres secured employment in the Gulf Oil Refinery in 
1936. He took leave of this position on 5 July 1942 to enter 
the United States Army Signal Corps. His overseas 
assignments included Bahamas, New Guinea; and the 
Philippine Island. Upon discharge from the service, he 
returned to his position with Gulf Oil and retired after over 
40 years of service in 1976. 

His interest in photography began in 1932 and since 
his retirement he has developed a complete photographic 
resources center. Ayres has been actively associated in 
photographic work with several authors in this area. He 
also serves as special staff photographer for a number of 
local newspapers. 




/ 



Ayres Unger 
in Uniform 



Ayres Unger Today 



Gerald R. Schoelkopf 

Gerald was born 6 July 1945 in Reading, 
Pennsylvania. After graduating from Bishop McDevitt 
High School, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1963, he 
attended Villanova University and completed his Bachelor 
of Arts Degree in History/Literature 1967. Two years later 
he attained his Masters Degree in Library Science from 
McGill University in Montreal, Canada. 

Since 1969 he has been a faculty member of the library 
staff. In 1975 he studied at Case Western University, 
Cleveland, Ohio and received the Library Administrative 
Archival Certificate. 

For the past twenty four years the Author has worked 
closely with his office in archival research as well as being 
guest lecturer in graduate courses taught by the Author. 
This has created the Allen-Ehinger Special Collection of 
Rare Physical Education and Sport Books. These cover the 
past two centuries. His particular research efforts have 
been instrumental in developing the Author's recent Greco- 



XV 




Gerald R. Schoelkopf 



Roman Photo Atlas of Cultural-Athletic Archaeological Sites as 

well as this volume. 

He has clearly and concisely in five paragraphs 

defined "Retrieving the Past": 

A member of the university community 
hurrying past Anderson Hall on the way to a 
class might briefly wonder who this building 
was named after, but then they rush on not 
realizing that they have touched briefly on the 
rich traditions that lie behind the institution and 
reach out to influence our actions today. 

Many times we tend to think only in the 
present — the now — and forget what has gone 
before. These past triumphs — exciting gym 
shows, award winning art exhibits, famous 
lecturers, faculty research, and accomplishments 
of alumni — tend to fade rapidly into time and 
are forgotten. If we allow ourselves to forget 
these accomplishments we lose an important 
force — "pride." We need to have an institutional 
pride in the deeds of the past to give us a firm 
foundation to carry us through the present and 
help us not to lose sight of our goals. 

On most campuses the organization that 
devotes itself to keeping these memories alive is 
the university archives. When asking students 
what is an archives they invariably describe it as 
a storehouse for old books and papers, where 



objects which have lost their usefulness are 
packed away and forgotten. Unlike this 
description, the archives of today are an active 
organization that function as the collective 
memory of the institution, where what has gone 
before us is consulted, studied and used to help 
us establish who we are, what we are trying to 
accomplish and how we may approach the 
future. 

Archives have existed from earliest history to 
the present, but in recent years more and more 
institutions have recognized their importance 
and on many campuses and in industry, etc. 
archives have been revived or established. 
Today's archives may contain a great variety of 
sources — from the traditional books, papers, and 
photographs to microfilm, microfiche, computer 
disks and tapes, and the machines to access 
them on. 

With today's technology, access to the 
materials in the archives is much easier and 
quicker — especially with the increased use of 
computers to access the contents of our 
collections to create guides to help our users. 
Today we don't have to wonder "who was that 
individual" but can decide "I'm going to learn 
more about that individual and what their 
accomplishments were." 



I. The Beginning 



Every modern country in the world, since its earliest 
development, has significant evidences of public 
performances by talented individuals. These presentations 
covered a wide range of activities in dramatics, music, 
movement skills, artistic displays, performing animals, and 
combative activities. This also included a cadre of teachers 
or trainers who directed these programs. 

Historically the several periods of the year served as a 
venue for the natural appearances of talented performers. 
The planting as well as the harvesting of grain, grapes, and 
fruit from the fields produced celebrations or festivals. 
Dramatics, dialogues, music, and dances encouraged 
participation as well as enthusiastic audiences. 

The outdoor flat area which served as place to thresh 
grain became a place to celebrate — the antecedent of the 
theater and performing arena. 

Fairs, festivals, and wakes attracted public per- 
formers — singers, dancers, acrobats, actors, wrestlers, 
animal trainers, runners, musicians, and fortune tellers. 

Before the advent of schools and colleges there are 



many records of public development and spectator interest 
in these activities. 

In 1724 a circus troupe appeared in the open area 
outside the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Among the 
performers were clowns, rope walkers, and sword dancers. 
In 1785 a Mr. Pool opened a riding school in this city and 
offered shows which included clowns and "educated" 
horses. 

John B. Ricketts in 1792 built an arena in Philadelphia 
for his new riding school. On the 23rd and 24th of April 
George Washington attended the shows presented there by 
Ricketts. 

In 1809 the Walnut Street theater in Philadelphia, the 
oldest active playhouse in the United States, reopened as 
the New Circus featuring equestrienne and circus acts. 

Two years later on 28 September 1811 in nearby 
Chester County Courthouse an educational insti- 
tution — the West Chester Academy, was established. The 
first classes began in 1813 in this Academy making it the 
seventeenth oldest institution of higher learning in the 




WEST-CHESTER 
ACADEMY. 

PHE contributors to the West-Chester Academy, are 

* requested to meet at the Court-House in the Bdrough 
of West-Chester, on Seventh Day (Saturday) the 30th of 
this month, at one o'clock P. M. in order to consider of 
and adopt a Constitution for said Academy ; of which a 
draught will be submitted for their approbation, by the 
committee appointed for that purpose. 

By Order of the Committee. 
*,* THE Commissioners appointed at the last Meeting, 
to fix upon a Scite for, and superintendlhe building of said 
Academy, beg leave to inform the contributors that they 
have contracted for a Scite, and are making arrangements 
to go on with the work as early as possible— They therefore 
respectfully request the contributors to come prepared at the 
meeting advertised above, to pay an instalment of one fourth 
of their respective subscriptions, so that the Commissioners 
may be enabled to proceed advantageously in the purchase 
of materials for said building. 

By Order of the Commissiom-is. 

N. B. It is hoped the meeting will be numerously attended, 
$s every contributor will see the importance of the business 
to be transacted Such of our fellow-citizens who have not 
yet had an opportunity to subscribe, and who are disposed to 
patronize the institution, are requested to attend the meeting. 

November 18, 1811. 



►>•.»=» 



WEST CHESTER ACADEMY. REAR VIEW 



THE BEGINNING 



United States. At this early date provisions were made for a 
playground which the students could use. 

These early academies had similar varying financial 
problems in their period of existence creating partially 
inactive operations or closures. However in West Chester a 
group of prominent citizens met with the trustees of the 
academy to create a successor to the school. 

On 23 August 1869 the public meeting disclosed that 
the "trustees and contributors of the West Chester 
Academy would furnish their valuable property, library 
and museum as the basis for the establishment of a Normal 
School." 



By 9 September 1869 a committee of fifteen citizens 
prepared a document for the transition of the West Chester 
Academy to the Normal School. In addition, the Chester 
County Cabinet established in 1826 which furnished a 
building and museum for the Academy, would become 
part of and related to the Normal School. 

The General Assembly of Pennsylvania on 10 March 
1870 passed "An Act to Authorize the trustees and 
contributors to the West Chester Academy to become a 
State Normal School." 



Incorporated 



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ORIGINAL MAIN BUILDING 



II. West Chester State Normal School 



On September 25, 1871 Principal Ezekiel H. Cook and 
the staff welcomed 102 boys and 54 girls into the new 
Normal School building. 

The first year of the schools existence provided a 
multitude of problems whose final solutions were beyond 
the principal and his eleven faculty members. The duties 
listed for the chief executive could in no manner be 
completely carried out. 

The major resource to study the first years operations 
are revealed in the minutes kept for the weekly faculty 
meetings. The major concern was that of student discipline. 
The minutes of 16 October 1871 outlines the attempt to 
reward or punish students in terms of their behavior. 

Pice 4-16 Oct. - "Mel as usual. Called to order by Pres. 
reading of minutes by See. - after which the Standard of 
5+ was adopted for marking. 5+ was extremely good, 5 
very good, 4 good. 3 passable, 2 bad, 1 very bad. 
Misdemeanors - Gen. disorder from 1 to 10. Inattention 
in classes 1 ; Eating in classes 5; communication in classes 
1, replying or talking back from 1 to 5; Lack of prompt 
obedience 1 ; Unnecessary noise in entering or leaving class 
rooms 1 + ; lighting gas without permission 1 + ; spitting on 
floor 3; spitting down stairs 5+; tardiness at any exercise 
1 + ; wearing boots in school room 1; throwing dirt on 
floor 1: leaving chapel without permission 5; Going to 
sleeping rooms during study hours, without permission 
5+; Noi.sc ;iller retiring bell 5+; noise in study room 3+; 
Buffoonery 5+." 

The successive minutes of the faculty meetings reveal 
the attempts to meet the continuing disciplinary problems. 
The most positive act was the establishment of a Literary 
Society named for its sponsor and first President of the 
Board of Trustees Reverend William E. Moore. This 
organization would function most effectively for over 
seventy years. 

As the year closed Professor Cook would accept a 
new position in Columbus, Ohio, at the same time the 



board of trustees faced the major problem of learning that 
only one faculty member would be returning for the next 
school year. 

The newly elected principal, Dr. William A. Chandler, 
was a Chester County native with teaching experience. He 
had also received an M.D. degree followed by medical 
practice during and after the Civil War. 

The faculty minutes of the fall term are replete with 
the continuation of the disciplinary problems of the first 
year. Apparently Dr. Chandler's enthusiasm for 
educational aalministration waned to such an extent that he 
tendered his resignation in February to return to medical 
practice. 

The Board of Trustees in less than a year faced the 
problem of securing a new Principal. They acted quickly 
and elected the former Superintendent of Chester County 
Schools George L. Maris. His dual background in education 
and law will be the basis for his meeting the challenges of 
this new appointment. 

The first evidence of required physical training is 
noted in the faculty minutes of November 1873... 
"gymnastic exercises would have required attendance". 

The Moore Literary Society marked its second 
anniversary with a program presented by students and 
faculty. This included music, dramatics, and recitations 
with the Normal orchestra featured prominently. 

The 1874-1875 academic year provided a required 
daily drill in the Dio Lewis system of Light Gymnastics. 
This continued until December 31st when it was 
suspended. 

The school catalog of 1875-1876 noted that not only 
would the daily physical culture drill of Dio Lewis be 
practiced but that in favorable weather all students would 
engage in outdoor exercises. 



NORMAL SCHOOL 



E. H. Cook was born at Madrid, Maine, December 18, 
1845. After preparatory schooling al Maine Slate Seminary, 
Lewislon, he entered Bowdoin College. His college work was 
interrupted by a period of service in the Civil War (1864-65) as 
Quarter-master Sergeant in the First Maine Light Artillery. He 
returned to Bowdoin receiving his A.B. in- 1866 and his A.M. 
the following year. He successively served as Principal of 
Wilton Academy, Maine, Superintendent of Schools at Orange, 
New Jersey and Principal of Woodstock Academy, Connecti- 
cut. In 1869 he married Clara W. Coburn. In 1871 he was 
elected to the position as Principal of the West Chester Normal 
School. After one year's service, he accepted a position as 
principal of Columbus High School in Ohio, remaining there 
nine years. During his career he served in a number of 
positions as Principal including Potsdam State Normal School 
and Rutgers College Preparatory School. Dr. Cook also served 
as Professor of Economy and School Law in the School of 
Pedagogy of the University of the City of New York. He was 
the recipient of the honorary Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
from Colgate University and St. Lawrence University. He 
served as President of the State Teachers' Association of both 
New York and New Jersey as well as secretary of the National 
Association. Dr. Cook died November 8, 1907 at Madison, 
Wisconsin. 




EZEKIEL HANSON COOK 

1845- 1907 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Principal 1871 - 1872 




WILLIAM A. CHANDLER 
Principal 1872- 1873 A.M., M.D. 

(Winter Term) 1834- 1895 



William A. Chandler was born at Kennett Square, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania September 10, 1834. He enrolled at 
Michigan University, graduating with the degree of A.B. in 
1862. In his senior year in college and after graduation, he 
assisted Dr. Franklin Taylor at the Eaton Academy in Kennett 
Square. While serving as a teacher, he felt that his major 
interest was in the field of medicine so he continued his work 
at Michigan receiving the M.D. degree in 1863. He married 
Miss Louise A. Stein in 1864. He volunteered in the United 
States Army in 1864 as an assistant surgeon and was given hrs 
first assignment upon the Gettysburg battlefield. His 
government issue Civil War surgeon's chest with all instruments 
is on display in the college museum. He remained in the service 
as a medical director of hospitals in the West. Upon receiving 
his honorable discharge, he practiced medicine in Detroit. 
Michigan for seven years. He accepted the position of 
Principal in 1872 -but by the end of the winter term he 
resigned and moved to Philadelphia to return to medical 
practice. He was one'bf the founders of the Medico-Chirurgical 
College and served as a professor of Chemistry. He was a 
member of the Philadelphia Medical Society. Dr. Chandler 
died December 19. 1895 



NORMAL SCHOOL 



On January 15, 1876 the elementary children Model 
school made history by giving an entertainment in the 
chapel. This was a junior version of the Moore Literary 
Society program. In the following year on February 3, 1877 
the Society unveiled the first publication on campus. 
Bearing the title of the Moore Literary Gazette, Volume I, 
this would serve as a means of advertising future shows as 
well providing news reports of each performance. 

The seventh school catalog 1877-1878 year for the first 
time notes that the physical culture requirement will be 
centered on the leadership of one faculty member. 
Apparently Principal Maris asked for a volunteer among 
the faculty with no success. As has frequently occurred in 
educational management when no volunteers appear the 
"assignment" focuses upon a newly employed junior 
member of the faculty. 

Thus Mary K. Schreiner gains the unique distinction 
of being the first "physical education teacher" in the 
history of the school. The school catalog in its faculty lists 
bears the inscription ... "Mary K. Schreiner, M.A. Teacher 
of Reading and Gymnastics". 

Apparently this arrangement lasted only one year 
since at the start of the 1878-1879 session in the first faculty 
meeting Principal Maris could find no volunteer. At that 
point the faculty unanimously recommended that Principal 
Maris should take the assignment. He declined and said he 
would study the matter. 

By the spring term advertisements for the school 
included the following notation in faculty listings: "Mrs. 
Annie M. Maris — Calisthenics." Thus the Principal's wife, 



the former Miss Annie M. Pinkerton becomes the not 
necessarily willing second gymnasium teacher in the 
history of the school. 

In January 1879 the girls petitioned the Principal for 
play apparatus since the outdoor equipment was 
monopolized by the boys. 

The Normal year of 1879-1880 started with the 
formation of a second Literary Club. Named the Aryan 
Society, its first president was Professor C.B. Cochran. The 
student members selected blue and gold as their colors to 
rival the Moore Society's colors of garnet and gold. 

Concurrently their rivalry resulted in the formation of 
two music groups — the Union Glee Club and the Union 
Corps. These will make major major musical contributions 
to future school shows and exhibitions. 

The 1880-1881 school year culminated eight years 
under the leadership of George L. Maris. With doubled 
enrollment, the expanding physical plant, an increasing 
number of qualified faculty, and the growing reputation of 
the school and its graduates, he announced his desire to 
leave the position. He endorsed one of his own faculty 
members, George Morris Philips as his successor. Principal 
Maris would accept a Professorship at nearby Swarthmore 
College, one of the several educational leadership positions 
he would take in his career. 



George L. Maris was born April 16, 1842 in Chester 
County. He attended the public school in West Vincent 
Township and the West Chester Academy. He graduated in 
1867 from the University of Michigan following which he 
served two years as a teacher in Upper Uwchlan Township and 
four years in the West Chester Academy. In 1869 he gained 
two distinctions - marrying Miss Annie M. Pinkerton of 
Chester County and being elected Superintendent of the 
Public Schools of Chester County. Professor Maris accepted 
the challenge of this position and was responsible for a number 
of innovations. He restructured the local teachers' institutes 
throughout the county, organized service meetings for school 
directors and established an office for his base of operations. 
In 1871 he was reelected to the Superintendent's position but 
refused it to complete his law studies. When Dr. Chandler 
resigned in the spring of 1873, Professor Maris was 
unanimously elected to the position on March 13 by the Board 
of Trustees. The day before he had just been admitted to the 
practice of law by the Chester County Bar Association. Thus 
he always stated that he had the shortest law career of record. 
For eight years he energetically met the challenge of the 
Principalship providing the much needed educational leader- 
ship. 

Professor Maris taught classes, supervised the teachers and 
building staff, planned building improvements, introduced 
educational innovations and made the Normal School I he 
natural center of educational activities in the district. His wife, 
Annie, aided his efforts during his regime by teaching "wax 




GEORGE L. MARIS 

1842- 1921 
Principal 1873 • 1881 



fruits, flowers, and calisthenics." By now the enrollment of 
the Normal School had doubled. 

In 1881 he accepted a professorship at Swarthmore 
College. Shortly after he was appointed Principal of the Boys' 
Department of Friends Central High School of Philadelphia. 
When. the George School was opened by the Society of Friends 
at Newtown, Pennsylvania, Professor Maris was chosen to be 
its first principal. In this position he served several years 
providing I he superioi leadership which made Ihe school 
widely known in educational circles. Dr. Maris died April 28, 
1921. 



NORMAL SCHOOL 



The George Morris Philips Era 
1881-1920 



The former teacher, a Chester County native, and 
now Principal at age 31 brought extensive educational 
experience to the position. 

Principal Philips started the 1881-1882 school year 
with sixteen faculty members which included two new 
teachers. With the shortage of space his primary mission 
was to plan the construction of the addition of the South 
Wing to match the recently completed North Wing. 

The girl students had registered continual complaints 
concerning their using the outdoor exercise play area. They 
found themselves being "ogled" by the boys while they 
were exercising. As a result in the southeast basement of 
the new wing a ladies gymnasium was being planned. The 
newspapers referred to this new facility as a "romping 
room" or a "recess Elysium" in which the girls could 
exercise unmolested. 

By the 1883-1884 school year this much used facility 
provided the first truly volunteer gymnasium teacher for 
the school. 

Miss Mary A. Cummings arrived in the fall as a new 



teacher of Penmanship, Drawing, and Bookkeeping. A 
native of Enfield, New Hampshire she had taught twelve 
years in a girl's high school in Harrisburg. 

Two classes were scheduled each afternoon for Miss 
Cummings to direct. She must be credited for inspiring the 
girls to participate in planned public performances at that 
time in both Literary Societies. Her poetry as well as 
articles on the subjects of health and fitness appeared in 
both Literary Journals. As a unique accolade she is credited 
as chairing the committee charged with selecting the 
Normal School colors. This evolved by taking the combined 
colors of the two Literary Societies and creating the Purple 
and Gold for the Normal — College — University. 

On February 10, 1885 the faculty on record advocated 
the building of a gymnasium for the students. These same 
faculty became concerned with their own fitness and 
formed a lawn tennis club for exercise. 

The redoubtable Mary A. Cummings took inspiration 
from this development and wrote a twenty-eight line poem 
based upon the name of the faculty tennis club "Hit or 




GEORGE M. PHILIPS 

1851 - 1920 
Principal 1881 • 1920 



George Morns Philips was born October 28, 1851 at 
Atglen, Chester County, Pennsylvania. His early education 
included attendance at the high school conducted.by Professor 
William E. Buck. He entered Lewisburg University (Bucknell ) 
in 1867 and graduated in the classical course in 1871. 
Following graduation he taught Mathematics for two years in 
Monongahela College in western Pennsylvania. In 1873 he 
joined the faculty of the West Chester Normal School. In 1877 
he married a faculty member, Miss Elizabeth M. Pyle, a teacher 
of instrumental music. A year later he resigned to accept a 
professorship of Mathematics and Astronomy at Lewisburg 
University. In 1881 , upon Professor Maris's resignation, he was 
appointed Principal of the West Chester Normal School. 

Dr. Philips had the longest tenure of service, 39 years, of 
any Principal or President at West Chester. His accomplish- 
ments within and outside the institution he served were 
prodigious. He appeared as a teacher in classes and inaugurated 



the Normal School lecture course which brought outstanding 
men and women to the campus between 1890 and 1920. 
Among these were three United States Presidents - Theodore 
K. Roosevelt, William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson. He 
accompanied twenty Senior classes on their Washington tours 
where they had opportunities to meet the President and 
cabinet officers. 

In his community he served as Director of the National 
Bank of Chester County, founder and President of the Dime 
Savings Bank, Trustee of the Chester County Hospital, and 
President of the Chester County Historical Society twenty-six 
years. He was a trustee of Bucknell University and a member 
of the College and University Council of Pennsylvania 1895 to 
1912. He was appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania to 
the State Committee to codify and revise the School Laws 
from 1907 to 1911. He served as a member of the State Board 
of Education 1911 to 1914. 

He was much in demand as a lecturer on educational 
subjects and served as instructor in teachers institutes in the 
United States. He wrote a number of books including 
Astronomy, 1882; Natural Philosophy, 1883; Key to 
Philosophy (with C. C. Balderston), 1884; Civil Government of 
Pennsylvania, 1893; Geography of Pennsylvania, 1895; Nation 
and State, 1905; Pennsylvania Geography, 1907; and 
Silver-Burdett Arithmetic Series (with Dr. Robert F. 
Anderson), 1913. He was a constant contributor to 
educational journals. 

Prior to his death, he initiated a program, unique in his 
time, analagous to the contemporary Golden Age groups. He 
made lists of citizens over ninety years of age and invited them 
to a special dinner at the school. 

Death terminated his life work on March 11, 1920. On the 
New Chester County Court House, with the names of 
Washington, Lafayette, Darlington, and Taylor is inscribed- 
George Morris Philips-Scholar and Educator. 



NORMAL SCHOOL 



Miss." Her poem was titled "HITYRMIS". 

The Aryan Society is credited with presenting the first 
gymnastic-dance-music exhibition, undoubtedly under the 
encouragement and direction of Miss Cummings. Within 
the program was a featured tambourine drill performed by 
twelve young ladies. In preparation for their "debut" 
patterns and material was purchased to sew white 
costumes trimmed with blue ribbons. Tambourines were 
made and practices were scheduled in the girls 
gymnasium. 

On 20 December 1886 the costumed cast of girls 
presented their program of twenty-six different figures led 
by a girl captain and accompanied by the Aryan orchestra. 
Enthusiastically received as the best number in the show, 
by popular demand, they repeated their performance on 29 
June 1887. 

Two faculty members, Mary Cummings and Carrie 
Bemus, attended the Chautauqua Summer School in New 
York state. This institute offered an extensive educational 
and cultural program which included sport and physical 
activities. Thus Miss Cummings would broaden her 
background for teaching in the gymnasium. 

The 1888-1889 school year featured the appearance of 
the lawyer-lecturer William Blaikie from New York City. 
Author of a book "How To Get Strong", his appearance 
and the several presentation would motivate the changes to 
occur within two years. 

As a personal motivation on the Saturday following 
the lecture two students, Annie Smith and Katie Dunn 
walked to Fortieth and Market Street Philadelphia in six 
and one-half hours, a distance of over sixteen miles. 

Perhaps Blaikie's presentation also inspired a group 
of students to create and present "The Gipsy Festival" in 



the spring. Costumes were designed and made along with 
castanets and tambourines. Nine young ladies and nine 
gentlemen in gipsy dress provided the dramatics, music 
and dances. The presentation was enthusiastically received 
resulting in several encores. 

1111C GIPSY FESTIVAL. 

A very iJretty exerclse.entltled "The Gipsy 
Festival,' 1 was represented by a number of 
young ladles and gentlemen. The exercise 
consisted of music and dancing. Tbe curtain, 
on being drawn usMo revealed the gipsies 
asleep; they were soon awakened by their 
queen and rising sangamornlngsong. Other 
special features were the song and fortune 
telling feats of little Gipsy Jane, the appear- 
ance of two Yankee tin peddlers, and their 
story related In song, and the chorus 
with tambourine accompaniment, with 
which the t performance closed. The 
performers were loudly encored, and 
returning repeated the chorus. The 
Dames of those who represented "The 
Gipsy Festival" areas follows: Misses Liz- 
zie Steele (queen), Irene Snyden (Gipsy 
Jane), Alfle Snyder, Lena Mercer, Bes- 
sie Rath, Anna Sensenlg, iLuoretia Lam-, 
bora, Anna Low her, Nettle Cannon, Messrs. 
Ben. Gheen and Fred. Brady (peddlers), Geo. 
Paschal, Edwin McNalr, Lionel Darlington, 
J. II. Hall, Ralston Lubens, Win. Plum and 
Mr. Wagner. The accompaniments were 
played by Miss Hemperly. The dresses of 
the performers were fanciful and very pic- 
turesque, and all were delighted with the 
representations. At Its .close the meeting 
adjourned. 

Among the performers was Fred Brady who will not 
only manage the first Normal baseball team but who will 
direct and perform in the team Minstrel Show 11 March 
1893. 

George Morris Philips and the Board of Trustees also 
gained inspiration from William Blaikie's presentations. 
Not only were gymnasium structures studied but a 
committee from the Board led by the Principal visited 
leading schools in New York and New England to see 
gymnasiums and study plans. 

In January 1889 the trustees purchased four acres 




MARY A. CUMMINGS 



"HITYRMIS." 

A doughty knight and modest 'squire 

Enter the list- the tennis court. 
Upon the right another pair 

Pass to resist a lilt in sport. 
"Ah, Right, you serve; an honor lent." 

"O oui! ich dien,-so please you all; 
And you deserve a good one sent. 

Now- Love, fifteen!" Speeds back the ball. 
"With turn and cut, I'll next assault. 

This telling blow shall not rebound." 
Then quoth the king, "A fault, a fault! 

Love, thirty-so you give them ground." 
"Alu'dreizig! well! This time I win. 

Now send that back!" "I will, I will! 
Your 'squire may tell I sent that in." 

"Our loss, alack! Love, forty- ill! 
Now 'duce' we must, or lose the game! 

And here's a swift. We'll beat them yet. 
We can I trust, with careful aim. 

Each Point's a lift. that's a 'let.' 
There, that's all right!" '"Tis not denied." 

"Sent back I claim!" "Rcturncd-this way!" 
"Oh! what a flight! Out! on your side! 

You have the game." "Love, fifty-hey?" 

'Tor love- we played; you played lor gain. 

1 is no new thing in human ways, 
With both arrayed, though Love sustain 

All loss, we bring to Gain, the praise." 

M. A.C. 



8 NORMAL SCHOOL 



north of the school building for $9000.00. Thomas Roney 
Williamson, a prominent Philadelphia architect with offices 
at 136-138 South Fourth Street was given charge to develop 
plans for the new gymnasium based upon the exterior and 
interior plan of the Hemenway gymnasium at Harvard 
University. 



Principal Philips now faced the most difficult staffing 
problem in his professional career. From his visitations and 
conferences with a number of school, college and 
university leaders he prepared a detailed position 
description for the qualified person to create the physical 
training curriculum as well as direct all facets of the plan. 



— Interlud* 



The Brooklyn School of Physical Culture 
and the Chautauqua Institute, New York 



William G. Anderson organized the first conference in 
1885 for American teachers and leaders in physical 
training. He and his brother Henry directed the Brooklyn 
School of Physical Culture as well as the allied summer 



Physical Training Program at the Chautauqua Institute in 
New York. 

Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger in determining to enter the field 
of physical training enrolled in Dr. Anderson's school. His 








i£L^ 



>•' 




BROOKLYN SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL CULTURE 1889-1890 

On the left seated on a couple of mats is his Royal Highness DR. EHINGER, next to him His Serene 
Majesty Dr. Anderson. Third of the gentlemen, The All Sufficient Prof. LEWIS, our musician. Next The Great 
MR. PENNOCK (Dr. Anderson's willing assistant) and last the Grand Mogul (in his own estimation) MR. 
HENRY ANDERSON. 

Of the ladies (beginning in the left lower row) (1) is MISS ADAMS, Our Baby. The youngest of the class, 
who entertained us one evening at her house. (2) Is our high-jumper MISS AGNES JONES - record of five feet 
three inches running high jump from spring board. (3) MISS ELLA BURKHARD, the class historian who 
entertained the class most delightfully. (4) The profile MISS EDITH LINTON, our wealthy one, Beautiful 
Singer. (5) HELEN FROTHINGHAM, the smallest and pet of the class. (6) MISS IDA RUSSELL, the class poet 
(7) MISS KANE, pianist (8) MRS. HENRY ANDERSON. (9) MISS ELEANOR MUNGER, nice pleasant girl. 
(10) MISS HARRIS, recently sailed for Germany. (11) MISS McQUESTON, The Little Elephant, our fat one. 
(12) MISS CHIDESTER (13) MISS GRACE FARR, Class Prophet. 

TOP ROW beginning at left (1) MRS. DONNELLY (not in regulation suit). (2) MRS. MAXWELL (these 
two did not come regularly). (3) MISS CARRIE LYMAN, our fine anatomist. (4) MISS FANNIE BATES, who 
won the class prize for all-round superiority. (5) DR ANDERSON, and lastly, MRS. CLYDE, The Class 
Chaperone. Our president, MRS. HINKLEY had sailed for South America just before the photograph was 
taken so she does not appear. MISS BATES was also our secretary and treasurer. The apparatus held by the 
class includes fencing foils, clubs, dumb bells, wands which paint the class that it give us all ghastly, 
cadaverous appearances. In fact, not one of the pictures are perfect. 



NORMAL SCHOOL 9 



wife Ella also enrolled in the program. Upon his 
completion of the courses he became a professional 
associate and served on Dr. Anderson's staff at the 
Chautauqua Institute in the summers. From these 
experiences Dr. Anderson and Dr. Ehinger developed a 
deep friendship and close professional relationship which 
would endure through both men's lifetime. 

Of particular historic significance are two 
photographs from Dr. Ehingers records 1889-1890. The first 
depicts Dr. William G. Anderson, his brother Henry, and 
Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger, along with a number of professional 
associates in the gymnasium at the Brooklyn School of 
Physical Culture. With the first photo is a handwritten 
letter titled Index to Class Picture which identifies each 
person accompanied by humorous character delineations. 

The second photograph uniquely gives an 1890 
outdoor view of students and teachers at the Chautauqua 
Summer School in New York State. It is titled: 
Dr. Enebuske's Class in Swedish Gymnastics 
Dr. Ehinger is at the right end of the back row, #10 
Dr. Claes Enebuske was a visiting teacher of Swedish 
gymnastics based upon the Nils Posse system. Dr. 
Enebuske is #1 fifth from the left in the back row. Ten 
names are identified in the photo. Dr. Enebuske's book on 
Swedish Gymnastics is in the Allen Ehinger book collection 
in the West Chester University library. 

On 7 September 1889 the site of the new gymnasium 
was staked out and two days later the general contractors, 
Plummer and Jefferies, had horses pulling scoops to 
excavate the plot. On 9 October Serpentine stone cut from 
nearby Brinton's quarry was being set in the walls. By the 
first week in December workmen began boarding up the 
unfinished gymnasium to protect it from the storms of 
winter. In the spring work would resume since the contract 
stipulated that the gym would be completed by 1 August 
1890. 



An historic moment occurred on 22 November when 
the first "Normal Band" was organized with student 
members under the direction of Frederick Clough. The 
main purpose was to furnish march music for a military 
company composed of students. The first concert given on 
22 February 1890 was a complete success. The group would 
be the sources of musical talent to play for future 
exhibitions and other performing groups. This in later 
years will evolve into the marching band who in turn will 
be a part of the quadrennial circuses in the twentieth 
century. 

One of the most significant programs — The Normal 
Lecture Course — was initiated by Principal Philips in the 
school year. Continuing into present times, this brought to 
the campus prominent men and women from all 
professional areas of life to give talks and presentations to 
the students. Included were three United States Presidents; 
Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft and Woodrow Wilson. 
Performers, artists, political figures, and all categories of 
prominent Americans participated in this vital Normal 
Lecture Course. 

Principal Philips had been diligently searching for a 
Director for the New Gymnasium. To finalize his efforts he 
and several of the trustees visited Dr. William G. Anderson 
at his Brooklyn School of Physical Culture. There 
interviews were held with Dr. Anderson and Dr. Ehinger 
concerning the latter's potential for the new position. 

On 28 April Dr. Philips noted the end of the search 
resulted in the employment of Dr. Clyde E. Ehinge- as 
Director. His wife Ella would also be employed as an 
associate. A number of news releases with photographs 
were made in reference to this by Principal Philips. In 
addition a series of cards with color printing concerning the 
appointment of Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger as well as 
information concerning the new facility were mailed or 
distributed to students, alumni and the general public. 




I 



DR. ENEBUSKE'S SWEDISH GYMNASTICS CLASS 

CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK— SUMMER, 1890 

Back row (left to right): (5) Miss Winne, (4) Mr. Winne, (3) Miss Bowler, (2) Dr. 
Hanchett, (1) Dr. Enebuske, (6) Mr. Pennock, (7) Miss Lindley, (8) Miss Wheeler, (9) Miss 
Barnes, (10) Dr. Ehinger, (front row unknown). 



Mm- n# 




v BP^r ^^ 










J4 




^ 




Mrs. Ella Ehinger 



Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger 



III. Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger 

Director of Physical Education 1890-1921 

Born in 1858, the son of Dr. George E. Ehinger, in Lee County, Iowa. He studied medicine in 
1876 at the State University of Iowa and completed his medical education at Chicago Homeopathic 
Hospital. He served two years as intern in Cook County Hospital after which he practiced 
medicine in Chicago for two years. 

He married Ella M. Long of Quincy, Iowa on October 16, 1883. After practicing medicine in 
Quincy for five years he and his wife decided to enter a new field — The practice of hygiene and 
physical training. Enrolling in the Anderson Normal School of Gymnastics at Brooklyn, New York 
they graduated in 1890. In addition they also studied at the Chautauqua Summer Program in 
Physical Training directed by William G. Anderson. 

In early spring of 1890 Dr. George M. Philips and a board member of the West Chester State 
Normal School accompanied by T. Roney Williamson, Philadelphia architect of the new 
gymnasium came to the Anderson School to select a Director of Physical Training. They chose Dr. 
Clyde E. Ehinger and his wife Ella to assume the joint positions for their school. 



12 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



Dr. Ehinger's Staff Assistants 1890-1920 



NAME 

Otto Monohan 

Mr. Otto F. Monahan, who was brought here by Dr. Ehinger from his home 
in Quincy, Illinois, began his work at the Normal when the Gymnasium was 
new and remained about five years, when he entered the New Haven Normal 
School of Gymnastics for a little study, and also assisted Dr. William G. 
Anderson, physical director at Yale University. While there the position of 
physical director of Trinity School, New York City, was offered him and 
accepted. After remaining there two years he was called to the head of the 
physical training and athletic department at Hotchkiss School (preparatory 
school for Yale). 



SERVICE 


GYMNASTIC 


DATES 


PROGRAMS 


======= 


=========================== 


1890-1894 


16 December 1892 




9 February 1894 
15 December 1894 




Minstrel Show 11 March 1893 



Charles F. Werner 

Mr. Charles F. Werner, of East Orange, NJ, whose training was obtained 
among the Germans of that locality, and at the Harvard Summer School of 
Gymnastics, acted as assistant at the Normal for one year after Mr. Monahan's 
departure. Mr. Werner was a very skillful gymnast, and will be remembered 
for his fine work. 



1894-1895 



15 December 1894 
13 December 1895 



Carl L. Schrader 

Dr. Carl L. Schrader was for a number of years a member of 

the Philadelphia Turngemeinde. He assisted Dr. Ehinger most 

ably for over four years, when he was called to take charge of 

the physical department of the State Normal School at 

Geneseo, New York. While there he married Miss Maude 

Wallace, of Peterboro, New Hampshire, also a physical 

director, who assisted him for a time in the young woman's 

department. After three years there Mr. Schrader accepted the 

two fold work of assisting Dr. D. A. Sargent in the Hemenway Gymnasium at 

Harvard University and to become associate director of the Sargent Normal 

School of Gymnastics at Cambridge. 



1896-1899 




13 December 1895 

17 December 1897 

13 March 1899 

2 March 1900 



Charles B. Lewis 

Mr. Charles B. Lewis, who also received his early training in the 
Philadelphia Turngemeinde, assisted in the Normal for three years, then 
accepted the position of physical director at Allegheny College, Meadville, PA 
Leaving there after two years, he became head of the physical training 
department at Tuft's College, Mass., where, in addition to his professional 
duties, he completed his course in medicine, receiving his degree of "M. D." 
Leaving there he spent two years as physical director of Worcester Academy, 
then was made supervisor of physical training in one of the High Schools of 
Worcester, Mass., where he now is. For the last five years Dr. Lewis has been 
on the Faculty of the Harvard Summer School of Gymnastics. Dr. Lewis was 
married to Miss Mary A. Stevens, a New England girl. 



1900-1903 



1 March 1901 
7 March 1902 



Llewellyn Hoopes 

Mr. Llewellyn Hoopes, son of Dr. Levi Hoopes, of West Chester, and 
graduate of the New Haven Normal School of Gymnastics, became Dr. 
Ehinger's assistant, remaining at the Normal two years. Leaving West Chester 
he became assistant in the Gymnasium at the University of Virginia. At the 
end of two years he succeeded Mr. Carl L. Schrader at the Geneseo State 
Normal School. Remaining there two years Mr. Hoopes married Miss Zay 
Engle, a graduate of the West Chester Normal, Class of 1901, and of the 
Boston Normal School of Gymnastics and together they took charge of the 
physical training department of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, for two 
years, after which Mr. Hoopes spent one year as instructor of gymnastics at 
Milliken University, Decatur, EH, then removed to Kansas City, where he was 
director of the gymnastic department of the Westport High School. 



1903-1904 



6 March 1903 
4 March 1904 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 13 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 



Carl O. Hierholzer 

Mr. Carol O. Hierholzer was another of Dr. Ehinger's assistants who 
received his first training at the Philadelphia Turngemeinde and did most 
excellent work at the School for two years, leaving there to further his studies 
at the Sargent Normal School of Gymnastics, of Cambridge, Mass., where he 
acted as assistant and received his diploma. Completing this course, he was 
elected to the position of supervisor of physical training in the public schools 
of Philadelphia. At the end of two years he took charge of the gymnastic work 
of the Bordentown Military Academy, Bordentown, NJ. After remaining there 
two years he returned to the Philadelphia public schools, where he was made 
Supervising Principal in the Physical Training Departments. 



1905-1906 



3 March 1905 
2 March 1906 



George B. Mullison 

Mr. George B. Mullison received the most of his training in the Central 
branch, Y. M. C. A., Philadelphia. Mr. Mullison remained two years at the 
Normal, where he did good work and exhibited strong organizing ability. 
Leaving West Chester he became physical director at Temple University, 
Philadelphia, and while there he began his course in the Medical Department 
of that institution. The following year he was appointed one of the associate 
physical directors in the Philadelphia public schools, but he continued his 
medical course at Temple University, graduating in the Spring of 1912 with 
honor, receiving three prizes for the excellent work he did during the course. 
Last June Mr. Mullison married Miss Helen Eagle, a graduate of the West 
Chester Normal, Class of 1908, and was appointed by Superintendent 
Brumbaugh a member of the Athletic Board of the Philadelphia Public 
Schools, and made physical director of one of the Manual Training Schools of 
that city. 



1907-1908 



1 March 1907 
28 February 1908 




Frederick Reith 

Mr. Frederick Reith, of Philadelphia, whose gymnastic 
training was obtained in the Philadelphia Turngemeinde, 
remained at the Normal for two years. He will be remembered 
for his gentle, refined manner, and finished gymnastic work. 
Mr. Reith left West Chester to accept a position in Newark 
Academy, and after one year there was appointed one of the 
assistant supervisors of gymnastics in the Philadelphia Public 
Schools. 



1909-1910 



5 March 1909 




Albert D. Harrington 

Mr. Albert D. Harrington, a graduate of the Posse Normal 
School of Gymnastics, Boston, finished his second year of work 
this past Spring. He was popular, efficient teacher, and skilled 
gymnast. Mr. Harrington left the Normal to accept a fine 
position in Waltham, Mass. 



1911-1912 



3 March 1911 
1 March 1912 




Frank A. Long 

Dr. Ehlinger's present associate is Frank A. Long, of 
Newark, NJ. His gymnastic training was secured in 
Providence, RI, Y. M. C. A. and the Y. M. C. Union, of Boston. 

Mr. Long did playground supervision at Roxbury, Mass. 



1912-1916 



26 Feb. 1913 
7 March 1914 

9 April 1915 
10 March 1916 



14 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 




Arthur C. Maroney 

Athletics felt the pinch first with the departure of Coach 
Maroney to the service and second because many of the boys 
at the Normal were helping on farms in the area. The schools 
that they usually played advised them they could not field a 
team. As a result, many of the track and baseball contests were 
cancelled. 



1915-1917 




Herbert L. Mathers 

Graduate of Hulmeville High School, West Chester State 
Normal School, and Pennsylvania State College. While at West 
Chester, took an active part in athletic work, getting the varsity 
"letter" in Basketball, Baseball, Gymnastics and Track. At 
College, he was captain of the Track Team. Later he went on to 
coach the Track Team at Virginia Polytechnic Institute during 
the season of 1920, and is now our Athletic Director. 



1920-1923 



11 March 1921 
18 March 1922 
16 March 1923 




C. Lauman Davis 

Studied Physical Training at both West Chester Normal 
School and Battle Creek, Michigan. Served overseas in the 
339th. Infantry during World War I. At present assisting in 
Physical Training Department. 



1920 




Bert Hall 

First coach of football at West Chester Normal. 



1920-1922 




Dr. Ehinger and staff in 1901 (sitting left to right): Mary Griffith, Katie Darlington, Mrs. Llewellyn 
Hoopes; (center): Edith Scott Paschall; (standing left to right): Charles B. Lewis, unknown, Ada Cornwell 
Hemphill, Mrs. C. E. Ehinger, Llewellyn Hoopes and Dr. C. E. Ehinger. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 15 




Mrs. Ella Ehinger's Staff Assistants 1890-1921 

NAME 
Anna R. Hughes (Mrs. Gibbs) 



Nathena P. Young (Mrs. Godfrey) 
Miss Nathena P. Young, of Willmantic, Conn, (now Mrs. 
Harry W. Godfrey, of Hartford, Conn.), was a graduate of the 
New Haven, Conn., Normal School of Gymnastics. After filling 
the assistant's position at the Normal one year, Miss Young 
was called to the State Normal School at New Britain, Conn. 



SERVICE 


GYMNASTIC 


DATES 


PROGRAMS 


================== 


============== 


1895-1896 


22 February 1896 


===:= = =:======: =— = = = = 


==============: 


1897-1898 


4 March 1898 



Ada W. Cornwell (Mrs. Joseph Hemphill Jr.) 1898-1902 

Miss Ada W. Cornwell, daugter of Captain R. T. Cornwell, of West Chester 
(now Mrs. Joseph Hemphill, Jr.), was a graduate of the New Haven Normal 
School of Gymnastics. Miss Cornwell assisted Mrs. Ehinger for almost five 
years. 

Elizabeth G. Holmes 1902 

Miss Elizabeth G. Holmes, of Moorestown, NJ, a graduate also of the New 
Haven Normal School of Gymnastics, remained at the Normal one year, when 
the position of associate physical director at the University of Missouri was 
offered her and accepted. 

Emily Cope Smedley (Mrs. Henry G. Palmer Jr.) 1903 

Miss Emily Cope Smedley, daughter of Mrs. Deborah C. Smedley, of West 
Chester, graduate of the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, taught at the 
Normal one year and after accepting the position for a second year was 
prevailed upon to assume the position of physical director at the Westtown 
Friends Boarding School, where she taught with great success. 

Florence L. Towle (Mrs. O.B. Bromley) 1904 



13 March 1899 
2 March 1900 
1 March 1901 



7 March 1902 



6 March 1903 



4 March 1904 



Alice M. Christiansen 1905 

Miss Alice M. Christiansen, of Jamaica Plain, Mass., after completing her 
course in physical training at the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, taught 
one year at West Chester Normal, when she was called to the head of the 
physical department in one of the important schools of New England, at 
Gloucester, Mass. Miss Christansen is now teaching with great success as 
physical director in the Eastern Illinois State Normal School, at Charleston, HI, 
and has recently published an excellent little treatise on gymnastics. 

Agnes Thompson 1906-1907 

Miss Agnes Thompson, also a graduate of the Boston Normal School of 
Gymnastics, assisted at the Normal for two years, when she accepted the 
position of supervisor of physical training in the public schools of the districts 
of Ardmore and Bryn Mawr. 



3 March 1905 



Margery W. Davis (Mrs. Frederick Pratt) 

Miss Margery W. Davis (now Mrs. Frederick Pratt, of Buffalo, NY) after 
completing her course at the Boston School of Gymnastics, filled the 
assistant's position at the Normal most ably for two years, when she became 
associate physical director at Dana Hall, preparatory school for Wellesley, at 
Wellesley, Mass. 



1908-1909 



2 March 1906 
1 March 1907 



28 February 1908 
5 March 1909 



16 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 




Rachel Pearl Johnson (Mrs. Palmer E. Strode) 

Miss Rachel Pearl Johnston, after graduating at the Sargent 
Normal School of Gymnastics, at Cambridge, Mass., remained 
at the Normal for three years, and while the Faculty and pupils 
at the Normal greatly regret to see her leave them, they 
congratulate the public schools of West Chester in having 
secured her services a supervisor of physical training. 



1909-1912 3 March 1911 

1 March 1912 
7 March 1914 (Accompaniest) 




Margaret I. Harding 

The present assistant, Miss Margaret Harding, daughter of 
Mr. Walter H. Harding, of South Duxbury, Mass., has just 
completed her training at the Sargent Normal School of 
Gymnastics, Cambridge, Mass., and spent the last Summer 
supervising one of the playgrounds. 



1912-1914 



28 February 1913 




Marguerite Belden (Mrs. Carter) 

A graduate of Central High School, Springfield, Mass., and 
New Haven Normal School; taught in the public Schools of 
New Haven; summer playground work in Sprinfield, Mass. 
Assistant Physical Director at West Chester State Normal 
School. 



1913-1914 



7 March 1914 




Gertrude S. Chapman (Mrs. F.A. Homsath) 

Born in Marblehead, and educated in the public schools of 
the same town. Later, graduated from the Sargent School of 
Physical Education, Boston. 



1915-1916 



9 April 1915 

10 March 1916 

5 April 1916 




Sarah E. Hamilton (Mrs. E. Howard Mellor) 

A graduate of the New Haven Normal School of 
Gymnastics and of Harvard Summer School. After a successful 
record as a teacher in the Young Women's Christian 
Association in Chicago, Newburgh (NY) and Chester; in the 
Edinboro and Lock Haven Normal Schools, and the 
Wilmington (Del.) Friends' School. 



1916-1918 




Mabel H. Barton (Mrs. Harold Barkley) 

Our assistant Gymnasium instructor came to us from 
Raleigh, NC, where she had been teaching in the public school 
St. Mary's. She is a graduate of the Sargent School of Physical 
Education and has also taken courses at Harvard Summer 
School. 



1919-1922 



11 March 1921 
18 March 1922 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 17 



The New Gymnasium at the West Ches- 
ter State Normal School. 



/•'rem Afiiorc l.ilerant (ia~clte, /hi 



ij, /.V<>. 



Of course the new gymnasium is the great attraction this year, tt was 
finished early iu September ami apparatus was at once put in. And it is even 
finer ami more complete than any of us anticipated. I'irst in importance is 
the gymnasium proper which occupies the whole second iloor of the main 
'iiiilduig This room is one hundred feet long and sixty feet wide, the high- 
est part of its ceiling being more than fifty feet ahove the floor. Twelve feet 
above the 'floor circles the gallery containing the running track, with its 
Lurus properly inclined and the track itsulf covered with felt and painted 
canvass., Seventeen laps to the mile, the largest indoor track yet constructed 
ill America. The lighting of this room deserves special mention ; there is 
•lothing like it elsewhere. The great windows on all sides of the building, 
ind the four large sky-lights in the roof show that the Building Committee 
heeded Dr. Sargent's advice in that direction. While at night the electric 
iight lights up every part of the building almost as brightly. In front of the 
uiain building is an annex containing the main entrance and the staircases 
■eading both up and down. On one side of the entrance are a neatly furn- 
; shed reception room am! an office for the Director ; ou the other side is the 
examination room. In the basement of the annex is a handsomely ap- 
pointed toilet room with marble trimmings and the best of fixtures. Oppo- 
site to it is the shower room, with its half-dozen shower baths, hot or cold at 
pleasure and varying iu form and effect. This room is the especial delight of 
the boys. Communicating with the shower room by way of a hot room is 
•.he great swimming-pool, forty by twenty feet, and holding more than 
twenty thousands gallons of water. It is deep enough everywhere for swim- 
ming, yet not deep enough to drown one. The water is well wanned and 
frequently changed. Beyond the pool is the locker-room, with one hundred 
ind thirty lockers, each five feet high, fitted with keyless locks, open brass 
doors, and galvanized wire netting tops and bottoms. Coils of steam-pipes 
run underneath the lockers to dry oflf the clothing. Next comes the alley- 
room with its three bowling-alleys fitted up in the best manner and of course 
never idle. And just beyond is the ball cage, sixty feet long, thoroughly 
lighted and so surrounded by wire netting that nothing can be injured as the 
base ball players practice pitching, catching, and even batting. The appa- 
ratus was put in by the Narragansett Machine Company, of Providence, R. 
I., now the leading manufacturers of gymnasium apparatus in this country. 
Every useful variety of apparatus is found, all of the best quality, and in 
large quantity. There are forty-two pairs of chest-weights, one hundred 
pairs of dumb bells, one hundred pairs of Indian clubs, two sets of travelling 
rings with eight rings iu each set, four sets of parallel bars, two vaulting 
horses and buck, four rowing machines, together with breast-bars, traveling 
parallels, vaulting bars, capstan, wrist and finger machines, striking-bags, 
climbing ropes ami poles, etc. The total cost of the apparatus has been 
more than £3000, while the gymnasium itself and its equipment have cost 
over 530.000. 

All students are given a thorough physical examination by Dr. or Mrs. 
Hhinger. This includes the measurement of every part of the body, the 
testing of the lungs, heart, eyes, etc. More than sixty different examinations 
and records are made for each person. The rules of the American Associa- 
tion for Physical Culture are followed in these examinations and the record 
of their results. 

On Mondays, Wednesdays and alternate Fridays, from Sa. m. until 3. 15 p. 
ill., the young men go to the gymnasium in classes, each lasting three-quarters 
of an hour, and are systematically drilled by Dr, Ehiuger, all of the young 
man being expected to do this work. At 3.15 the ladies from West Chester, 
to the number of forty or more, have their class work under Mrs. Ehin^er, 
while from four until six the young ladies of the school and the town ladies 
all have the "run" of the gymnasium, swimming, bowling, or exercising at 
pleasure, but under Mrs. Ehinger's direction always. On Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days, and the other Fridays, the young ladies have their class-work from 
e'ght until a quarter past three, while from four until six the whole building 
is given up to the boys, Dr. Ehiuger being always there with the young men. 
On Saturdays it is also open for voluntary work, while in the evenings a 
large class of young men from town take the advantage of the unusual ad- 
vantages here offered them. This program is found to work admirably. The 
gymnasium is in constant use, day and night, and every student _has an 
opportunity to use it every day. It need scarcel v be said that the gymnasium 
is exceedingly popular with the students And the excellent effects are 
shown in the fact that there have been fewer sick than ever before, while 
Steward Johnson reports that the consumption of provision has increased 
alarmingly. 

Nothing connected with the gymnasium is a greater success than its di- 
rectors. Dr. and Mrs. Ehiuger. The Doctor, by his line physique, his medi- 
cal training and practice, and by his special training for this work, is exactly 
suited to it. He is an excellent gymnast and a natural leader. Mrs. Ehinger. 
like her husband, is thoroughtv fitted bv nature and experience for her work 
with the girls. Both are exceedingly popular. In fact we believe that we 
have here at West Chester State Normal School the very best gymnasium in 
this country, and that its directors and equipments are also the best to be 
[bund, audit might not be amiss to add that we speak from a pretty general 
knowledge of the subject too. 




THE GYMNASIUM. 

The West Chester Stale Normal School »ai 
the first norma 
school in lh" St He, 
and probably ill the 
country, to build 
and ei|iii|> :i first 
class, modern gym- 
nasium, stud to jiii' 
i 11 eliarge of it 
thoroughly compe- 
tent directors. I'll" 
gymnasiuui when 
built, four year, 
ago, was withou 
exception the best 
and most complete 
gymnusi uui pos- 
DR. E. C. F.IIIXGEi:. sessed by any col- 
•ge or school in the United States, and it has 
since been surpassed only by the new Yale 
gymnasium. It is built of the same beautilul 
•Teen stone, is llWxOt feet, with an annex 2Sx 
M reel. The basement, 12 feet high, contains 
a swimming pool, 40x20 feet, holding about 
20,000 gallons of water, which is warmed be- 
fore running into it; three bowling alleys; a 
ball cage for practice at ball in cold weather; 
a large number of lockers 
for clothing, shower- 
baths, dressing rooms, 
etc. Above is the main 
gymnasiuui, lOOxGO feet, 
the ceiling rising to a 
height of 51 feet from the 
lloor; a running track, 
with canvas and felt 
track, encircles the room 
twelve feet from the 
tloor, with a length of 
seventeen laps to the 
mile. The gymnasium 
contains three thousand 
dollars worth of the best 
apparatus. A directors' office, reception 
room as well as examination room are 
in the annex and every student is care- 
fully measured yearly according to the rules 
of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Physical Culture. These comprise 
sixty different measurements, and test the 
heart, eyes, hearing, etc., carefully. The 
gymnasium affords complete and comprehen- 
sive exercise in all weathers, and has been of 
great value to the health and study of the 
students. It is in charge of a physician and 
his wife, who are specially trained for this 
work, and give their whole time to it. 

^OTHE NEW GYMNASIUMS 




MRS. EHINGER. 




AT THB 



West Chester State Normal School. 



18 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




INTERIO R OF ,NOR7US7T L^ SCHOOL GY7«TNHSIUM. 



Amenta* 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 19 



WEST CHESTER LOCAL NEWS 



CLASSES IX qtMXASTlCS. 

The i i. - nml Gentlemen Prom the 

Town Arc Organized. 

_ On Friday afternoon at ."!.". o'do-k the 
Indie* from the town who intend takius a 
coursein the Normal School gymnasium m o[ 
nnd the class was* organized. A number of 
visitors were also present at that time, but 
the stormy condition of the weather kept 
inauy from coining out. Twenty-nine ladies 
gave their names to Mrs. Ehinger and i here 
areaboul a dozen others who have express? 1 
a desire to join theelass, but who on uec aim 
or the weather, or other causes were not pres- 
ent. Among the laaics in this class are 
several of the teachers in the school who on 
account pf class work are unable to join any 
of the school classes. 

Mrs. Khinger was present in her gym- 
nastic dress, and explained the work to the 
ladies, answering a number of questions 
which tney asked her ahout th* exercise 
dress, etc. The days on which this class will 
meet are Mondays, Wednesdays and alter- 
nate !• ndays at H.15, and from tour to six 
o clock on the same days they have the run 
ot the gymnasium along with the youug 
ladies of the school. Owing to the heavy 
expenses of building and furnishing the 
gymnasium, it is not at present possible to 
employ some one to furuish music for the 
exercise, hut Mrs. Khinger stated that if the 
Indies wished a musical accompaniment 
which added to the pleasure of the work- 
several from their number might take turns' 
in playing the piano. 

During the heavy exercise from four to 
fix the hrst fifteen minutes of the time 
mightbe given to dancing, whi-h is a health- 
ful form of exercise, but no more time could 
be spared lor this pleasure. A number of 
the la- lesri mained to watch the movements 
•>r the students after -1 o'clock, and they also 
explored the regions of the basement aud 
admired all parts of the fine building. Mrs. 
l-hinger also showed and explained to the 
class the apparatus about the room. 

THE EVENING CLASS. 

The class of gentlemen from the town was 
organized at 7.30 in the evening by Dr. 
i-.binger who explained the method of work 
answered questions, and made other neeea- 
snry arrangements. This class numbers 
(wenty.iour gentlemen, aud boys and others 
will probably join later. The attendance of 
Visitors in the evening was rather larger 
than that of the afternoon, and all appeared 
interested After the visitors had gone aw? y 
several of the gentlemen tried the swimniin' 
pool, which they found very satisfactory" 
the class which was organized last night 
will meet at the same hour on five evening 
of the week, a part of which time the 
numbers will be instructed by Dr. Ehiu»er 
ibe gymnasium was lighted for the first 
time uunng the evening on Friday night. 
Gymnastic Steps. 

— Tho janitor of tne gymnasium is Otto 
Monaban. He is still young, srnrcelv more 
tuan a boy, and Dr. and Mrs. Klilu-er 
brought tilin with them from tuiincy 111 
He Is excellently lilted for his position. Is 
thoroughly trustworthy and reliable and on 
account of Ills youth he will improve lu his 
work. He Is already making friends in the 
school, tl ud Is spokeu of In highest terms bv 
Dr. and Mrs. Khlnger. * 

— Tho water was turned into the swim- 
ming pool on Friday afternoon, and it look 
almost Hie. whole afternoon for it lo no 
tilled. Tue pool, which Is four feet deep lu 
one port, contains 500 barrels of water, or 
over '20,000 gallons, it Is intended that th» 
water shall run out at all times while a 
iresh stream is coming lu, and when neces- 
sary the water will he warmed. 

—The lockers are now being made and put 
up as last as possible. They are partlv cov- 
ered with wire for purposes of ventilation, 
and heat pipes will pass above aud below 
them, so that wet swimming suits hun» 
with-n them can easily be dried. Knch 
ocker Is provided with a Keyless lock, the 
couil-inatiou of which snail bo known only 
to those using it and tho director. 



— Workmen am still engaged In several 
parts of the basement. The Moor or the run- 
ning track was finished ami used on Friday 
forthetlrst. The radiators in the building 
have been Improved by a coat of gilding, 

—The members of the Faculty already 
notice n dl (Terence in the conduct and up- 
peurauce of the students. There are fewer 
i rooping, languid ana listless ones than be- 
fore the day s of the gymnasium, and all are 
bright and happy. 

— Kvery inoiiihcr of the Faculty will take 
the gymnasium course, cud some of them 
bid fair to do fine work. 

Gymnastic Steps. 

—Navy blue Is the prevailing color on the 
floor of the gymnasium while the girls are 
tukine exercise, as most of their suits are of 
that 

—Tee girl who plays the piano does not 
enjoy the fun as much as those who run or 
march about I In II 

— Some alterations and finishing arc being 
made in Ine lloor of the running track, and 
the pounding and other accompauving 
nolst with the instructions Ot Dr. 

aud .Mrs. Khinger. At"limes the carpenter 
work in this part of the building is ^topped 
in order that the exercises ma.) „-o on with- 
out Interruption, 

—Members of the Hoard of Trustees are 
frequent visitors to the gymnasium. A hue 
point from which lo view the operations on 
the Moor is from tho running. trACjjr- 

OPENING THE GYMNASIUM. 

The successful completion of the gym- 
nasium building was regarded as 
reason for congratulation. The com- 
mittee reported that some work is yet 
to be done in the way of fitting the building 
np with the necessary appliances for a first 
class gymnasium. On motion a committee 
was appointed to cooperate with Prof. 
Philips and Dr. C. E. Ehinger in arranging 
for a formal opening of the building as soon 
as it shall be entirely fitted np. The com- 
mittee as appointed consists of H. B. Bock- 
waiter Major L. G. McCanley. Charles M. 
Crowell, Prof. George M. Philips and Dr. C. 
r.. l.hinger. The committee have taken no 
action as yet.but what they may decide to do 
will be made public soon and it will no 
doubt interest the people of West Chester. 

At the "Gym." 

The tip-town class of gentlemen .lid them» 
selves much credit last evening at the Nor- 
mal's "gym" by the graceful manner in 
which they went through the various train- 
ing methods under the direction of Dr. 
hhinger. There were some thirty in the 
class, and lor two hours they followed the 
examples of their teacher to a very credit- 
able degree. When through the Doctor re- 
marked to a looker-on: "West Chester has 
good material for this branch of training, and 
I look for very satisfactory results in a little 
while." 



SATURDAY. OCT. 47l89Q. 



STJTfM A i. li'tais. 

"Sliing up" the Members of tile Athletic 
Club at the Normal. 

* D u' Ehringer examined quite a number 
of the Is ormal boys iD the examining room/in 
the gymnasium yesterday. The entries 
made in the large record book include the 
name, place born, nationality of parents 
and parents ancestors, age, inherited dis- 
eases or weaknesses, weight, height, capa- 
city of lungs, rate of heart beat, nccuracv 
of vision and hearing, circumference of 
neck, biceps, wrists, waist, hips, etc , to- 
gether with a number of other measure- 
ment of limbs, joiuts, muscles and caoae- 
|" es . making in all about sixty tests. 
Ine l)e>ctor greatly lessens the time re- 
quired for tbo examinations, by examining 
two at a time, nnd bv having oue boy make 
the entries while the other is bein<» meas- 
ured. Tho instruments used, as well as 
the measurements made, are all very 
accurate and exact, all of ihem measuring 
ns close as one tenth of an inch, aud some 
even closer. 

Remarked one of the new 6tndents last 
evening after supper. "It's a good thing 
they di.ln't plav those chimes durinc 
the first part of tho term. If thev had 
played 'Homo Sweet Home' like that about 
three weeks ago, we wouldn't have been 
cured of the homesickness yet." 

The Jlouros will present a good pro- 
gramme in the auditorium this eveuiu" at 
7:30. 

Mr. Ehinger has divived the boys who 
take exercise after four o'clock into a num. 
her of classes, each with an appointed 
lender to whom spocial training is given. 
Each class works for about fifteen minutes 
at one form of exercise, and then goes to 
something else. In this way much time 
is saved aud the Doctor is better enabled 
to give instruction. 

Normal Notes. 

—Nine new students entered the school on 
Monday, and the tolM number Is now 650. 

—The visitors to the school are not so 
Dumerous this week as last, for the teachers 
are no longer in the town. 

—The last touches have been given the 
svmnaslum. and it Is now entirely finished. 
The bowling alleys, wntch were the last 
portion of the building to be finished, 
appear to be as attractive to the girls as toe 
boys, and many of them enjoy rolling the 
balls. 




20 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



The New Gymnasium at the West Ches- 
ter State Normal School. 



From Moore 



'■lerury Cazette, /)« 



ISgO. 



Of course the new gymnasium is the great attraction this year, it was 
finished early in September and apparatus was at nine put in. And it is even 
liner and more complete than any of us anticipated. First in importance is 
'.he gymnasium proper which occupies the whole second floor of the main 
building- This room is one hundred feet long and sixty feet wide, the high- 
est part of its ceiling being more than fifty feet above the floor. Twelve feet 
above the floor circles the gallery containing the running track, with its 
'..urns properly inclined and the track itself covered with felt and painted 
canvass., Seventeen laps to the mile, the largest indoor track yet constructed 
11 America. The lighting of this room deserves special mention ; there is 
tothing like it elsewhere. The g-eat windows on all sides of the building, 
and the four large sky-lights in the roof show that the Building Committee 
heeded Dr. Sargent's advice in that direction While at night the electric 
light lights up every part of the building almost as brightly. "" In front of the 
main building is an annex containing the main entrance and the staircases 
leading both up and down. On one side of the entrance are a neatly furn- 
ished reception room and an office for the Director ; on the other side is the 
examination room. In the basement of the annex is a handsomelv ap- 
pointed toilet room with marble trimmings and the best of fixtures. Oppo- 
site to it is the shower room, with its half-dozen shower baths, hot or cold at 
pleasure and varying in form and effect. This room is the especial delight of 
'.be boys. Communicating with the shower room hv way of a hot room is 
the great swimming-pool, forty by twenty feet, and holding more than 
twenty thousands gallons of water. It is deep enough everywhere for swiru- 
ning, yet not deep enough to drown one. The water is well warmed and 
frequently changed. Beyond the pool is the locker-room, with one hundred 
and thirty lockers, each five feet high, fitted with keyless locks, open brass 
doors, and galvanized wire netting tops and bottoms. Coils of steam-pipes 
run underneath the lockers to dry off the clothing. Next comes the alley- 
room with its three bowling-alleys fitted up in the best manner and of course 
never idle. And just beyond is the ball cage, sixty feet long, thoroughly 
lighted and so surrounded by wire netting that nothing can be injured as the 
base ball players practice pitching, catching, and even batting. The appa- 
ratus was put in by the N'arragansett Machine Company, of Providence, R. 
I., now the leading manufacturers of gymnasium apparatus in this country. 
Every useful variety of apparatus is found, all of the best quality, and in 
large quantity. There are forty-two pairs of chest-weights, one hundred 
pairs of dumb bells, one hundred pairs of Indian clubs, two sets of travelling 
rings with eight rings in each set. four sets of parallel bars, two vaulting 
Worses and buck, four rowing machines, together with breast-bars, traveling 
parallels, vaulting bars, capstan, wrist and finger machines, striking-bags, 
climbing ropes and poles, etc. The total cost of the apparatus has been 
more than 53000, while the gymnasium itself and its equipment have cost 
over £30,000. 

All students are given a thorough physical examination by Dr. or Mrs. 
rChinger. This includes the measurement of every part of the body, the 
testing of the lungs, heart, eyes, etc. More than sixty different examinations 
and records are made for each person. The rules of the American Associa- 
tion tor Physical Culture are followed in these examinations and the record 
>f their results. 

On Mondays, Wednesdays and alternate Fridays, from Sa. m. until 3. 15 p. 
:u.. the young men go to the gymnasium in classes, each lasting three-quarters 
of an hour, and are systematically drilled by Or, Ehinger, all of the young 
man being expected to do this work. At 3.15 the ladies from West Chester, 
to the number of forty or more, have their class work under Mrs. Ehinger, 
while from four until six the young ladies of the school and the town ladies 
all have the "run" of the gymnasium, swimming, bowling, or exercising at 
pleasure, but under Mrs. Ehinger' s direction always. On Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days, and the other Fridays, the young ladies have their class-work from 
y'ght until a quarter past three, while from four until six the whole building 
is given up to the boys, Dr. Ehinger being always there with the young men. 
On Saturdays it is also open for voluntary work, while in the evenings a 
large class of young men from town take the advantage of the unusual ad- 
vantages here offered them. This program is found to work admirably. The 
gymnasium is in constant use, day and night, and every student has an 
opportunity to use it every day. It need scarcel v be said that the gymnasium 
is exceedingly popular with the students And the excellent effects are 
shown in the fact that there have been fewer sick than ever before, while 
Steward Johnson reports that the consumption of provision has increased 
alarmingly. 

Nothing connected with the gymnasium is a greater success than its di- 
rectors, Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger. The Doctor, by his fine phvsique, his medi- 
cal training and practice, and by his special training for this work, is exactly 
suited to it. He is an excellent gymnast and a natural leader. Mrs. Ehinger. 
like her husband, is thoroughly fitted by nature and experience for her work 
with the girls. Both are exceedingly popular. In fact we believe that we 
have here at West Chester State Normal School the vcr.- best gymnasium in 
■Jus country, and that its directors and equipments are also the best to be 
lOUiiil, and it might not be amiss to add that we speak from a pretty general 
knowledge of the subject too. 




THE GYMNASIUM. 

'J lie West Chester State Normal School was 
t h e first norma 
school in lit 1 ' St'Jle, 
ami probably in llie 
country, to build 
and etjuili a lirsl 
class, modem gym- 
nasium, and lo pu' 
i 11 charge of it 
thoroughly compe- 
tent directors. Tli- 
gymnasium when 
built, four yeuri 
ago, was* witliou 
exception the best 
and most complete 
gyinn as i u III pos- 
BR. E. C. EHIXGF.r.. sessed by any col- 
lege or school in the United States, and it has 
since been surpassed only by the new Yale 
gymnasium. It is built of the same beautiful 
green stone, is l(HxG4 feet, with an annex 2Ux 
SC feet. The basement, 12 feet high, contains 
a swimming pool, 40x20 feet, holdiug about 
20,000 gallons of water which is warmed be- 
fore running into it; three bowling alleys; a 
ball cage for practice at ball in cold weather; 
a large number of lockers 
for clothing, shower- 
balhs, dressing rooms, 
etc. Above is the main 
gymnasium, 100x00 feet, 
the ceiling rising to a 
height of 51 feet from the 
floor; a running track, 
Willi canvas arid felt 
track, encircles the room 
twelve feet from t h e 
lloor, with a length of 
seventeen laps to the 
mile. The gymnasium 
contains three thousand 
dollars worth of the best 
apparatus. A directors' office, reception 
room as well as examination room are 
in the annex, and every student is care- 
fully measured yearly according to the rules 
of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Physical Culture. These comprise 
sixty different measurements, and test the 
heart, eves, hearing, etc., carefully. The 
gymnasium affords complete and comprehen- 
sive exercise in all weathers, and has been of 
great value to the health and study of the 
students. It is in charge of a physician and 
his wife, who are specially trained for this 
work, and give their whole time to it. 




MRS. EHINGER. 




Philadelphia to west Chester 

October 2d. 1891. 



LEAVING PHILADELPHIA 
LEAVING WEST CHESTER 



5.15 P. M. 
9.50 P. M. 



15 NOVEMBER 1891 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 21 




The Gymnastic Entertainment 

By the Department of Phyeioal Culture of 

the West Chester State Normal Sohool. 

The Programme of Exercises. 

Hoo-rah rnh I 
Hoo-ray ray ! 
Kah-ran-rah ! 

rah ! ree ! 
S. N. S. W. 0. 

Friday oveniDg storms of 
tumultuous applause and 
Bnlvosof cnlhusiasticeboera 
shook tlio Wu»t Chester Nor- 
ui ul School gymnasium to 
the veiy foundations, nud 
more than eight hundred 
people from our town and 
Burroundiug country we'o 
entertaiued for two hours 
by a most excellent and 
successful exhibition of 
gymtiastio oxer, isos by 
eighty pretty and obarrniug 
girl biudents of the institu- 
tion under direction of Dr. 
and Mrs. C. E. Ehiugor. 
physical directors of the 
school. 

Several hundred students and townsfolks 
were crowded into the running track or 
gallery and the balance of the big crowd were 
seated upon chairs and benches along the 
sides of the main room or upon the tiers of ele- 
vated seats. Following was the programme i 
pabt I. 

Music— Piano Duett, 

Miss Maris and Miss Van K'ten 
?rce Gyuiuastios, 

First Division Twenty-four Model Pupils 
Free Gymnastics, 

Second Division Thirty-six Model Pupils 
31ub Swinging, 

Class of Thirty-two Young Ladies 
Exercises with Woodeu Kings, 

Glass of Thirty -six ; Young Ladies 
Heavy Work, 

Parallel Bars and Rope Climbing 
by Class of Fourteen Girls. 
The hoops used by the Seniors were pur- 
:hased with part of ttie proceeds of the exhi- 
bition given on December 16, 1893. 

PABT II. 

Music— Piano Duett, 

Miss Maris and Miss Van Etten 
Club Swinging, 

Muss BUhop and Miss Hamilton 
Hoop Drill, 

Thirty Young Ladies of the Senior Cluaa 
Military Drill, 

Class of Twenty-four Young Ladies 
Aesthetic Gymnastios— 

1. Exercises for Poise and Grace. ' 

2. Posture Groupings, representative^ : 
Languor, Mischief, Listening, Sur- 
prise, Expectancy, Fear, Grief, Sup- 
plicntion, Triumph. \ 

Seven Young Ladies of the Town Cla>w 
Grand March AH Classes 

Promptly at 7.30 o'clock a very pleasing 
pinuo duett waB given by Missis Maris and 
Vau Etten, after which twenty-four little girls 
and boys from the Model Department 
marched into the main room and after taking 
positions gave a charming exercise of arm, 
foot, head nud trunk movements, which was 
heartily applauded. 

As this first division took seats reserved 
for them, a second division of thirty-six older 
girls and boys marched in and gave ft pleasing 
exhibition of calistheutics and marchings 
which showed careful training. 

INDIAN OLUB SWINGING, 

There was a slight intermission and then to 
the Btialus of au luspiriug inarch, thoro b urst 
into view a class of thirty-two fair girls, at- 
tired in dark blue blouses with short sleeves, 
bifuroated Bkirts reaohiug to the knee, dark 
stockings, blaok gymnasium shoes, ana light 
blue neckties. They received n perfeot ovu- 
lion as they marched around the room, and 
finally gavo a olover exhibition of Inciiau 
club swinging, interspersed with tableau*. -Lue 
members of the class were: Misses 



Allele M. Baily, Corinne. Chester county. 
Mary Brooke, Brycrtowu, Berks county. 
Ella Brooke, Newtown, Bucks county. 
Katie Carroll, Betbsbeda, Lancaster Co. 
Florence Chalfant, Algleu, Chester Oo. 
Anna Davis, Williams Corner, Chester Co. 
Ella C. Darlington, West Chester. 
Miuuie Dowuie, West Chester. 
Bertha M. Forsythe, Avondale, Chester Co. 
Bessie Godfrey, Amber, Montgomery Co. 
Jessie Guukle, Frazer, Chester couuty. 
Cora Hamilton, Chester. 
Florence Heebneer, Worcester, Mont. Co. 
Abbie Jackson, Keltou, Chester Co. 
Margaret E. Jones, Liusford. Carbon Co. 
Adelaide Johnson, Borwyn, Cbustor county , 
Clara Keighloy, Landenuorg, Chester Co. 
Florouco May Mack, Joukiulowii, Moul.Co 
Florence Mackm, Wilkes Bmre. 
Bessie Mast, Mast, Lancaster Co. 
Nora Mescbter, Worcester, Mont. Co. 
L.Adalaide Motnt.UichlaudCentre.BucksCo 
Anna Morgan, Fan-view, Montgomery Co 
Mary J. Osborne, Carpenter, Delaware. 
M. Ida Palmer, Doe Hud, Chester county. 
Mary A. Pylo, West Chester. 
Sara Fassmore, Hisiug Sun, Maryland. 
Marion Baltestruw. Christiana, Lau. Co. 
Mary Sharpless, West Chester. 
Nellie Turner, Chester. 
Mabel Woodward, West Chester. 
Essie Wyuu, West Chester. 

WOODEN KINGS EZEECISES. 

The same class as foregoing with the ex- 
ception of Misses Mack, Forsythe, Pyle, 
Mast, Jones, Ueebner, gave a splendid exhi- 
bition witn the use o£ small woodeu rings. 
Added to the class were the followiug named 
gills : 

Ethel John, Sugartown, Chester Co. 

Laura Keiubley, Landeuberg, Chester Co. 

Laura Eiseuberg, Parker Ford, Choster Co. 

Jennie Pratt, Cloud, Chester Co. 

Annie Fetters, Glen Loch, Chester Co. 

Hannah Mendeuhall, West Chester. 

Florence It. Brosiue, Chatham, Chester Co. 

Clara Bickiug, Krcildoun, Chester Co. 

Eurie Bickiug, Ercildouu, Chester Co. 

This was one of the best of the exercises, 
the gioupings and posmgs being particularly 
charuii ug and were greeted with continuous 
applause. 

PAEALLEL BAE3 AND ROPE OLIM 11INO. 

The 6ixteen girls who participated in this 
heavy work were quite proficient in the va- 
rious movements which portrayed careful 
training, and the clever work of the class 
merited the applause which greeted tho va- 
rious exercises. The pyramids and suspen- 
sions on tho swinging ropes wire especially 
appreciated. Tho class included : 

Misses Florence lleebnei', Mary A. Fylo, 
Katheriuo Wildemau, of Bristol; Caroline 
Furmau of Chad's Ford; Abbie Jackson, 
Margaret Jones, Sara E. Martin, of Norway 
Chester couuty; Anna K. Hughes, of Minion, 
Delaware county: Stella Harrison, of Cluster; 
Clara Keighley, Manie Leahy, Bertha for- 
sythe, Frances Mack. Nona Heed, Bertha 
Gallagher and Annie Fetters. 

Fart second opened with another pretty 
niauo duett by Mioses Maris and Van Etten, 
after which Miss Charlotte Bishop, of Wesi 
Chester, and Miss Sara Hamilton, of Chester, 
gavo u Uue exhibition of Indian Club swing- 
ing. 

HOOP DltlLL. 

"Boom, Bis, rah ! 

Boom, sis, ree 1 

Normal, Normal, 
'9S." 
The abovo class yell by the boys of tho 
class of '93, greeted the class of Unity of tho 
girls of 93 iib they marched in for tho hoop 
drill. These guls wore the dark blue cos- 
tumes with big bright red ueektes, and 
carried largo rod hoops with which they gave 
some oxcoodlugiy pleasing movements, mid 
were most heartily applauded. Iho girls 

Leli'a Boitler, Annie Bertelotto, Florouco 
Detwiler, Lizzie Frederiok, Martha Futhoy, 
Bessie Grater, Bessie Hnghes, Alice IrwiP, 
Anna Jnckson, Electra Jackson, LvuKeuip, 
Emma Knight, Lizzie Leigh, Anna Loymel, 



Anna Lilly, Cornelia McMullen, Sara Mar- 
tin, Ella Mather, Edith McDonald, Knthrvn 
Murphy, Ella ltr.tb, Maiy Scott. Ella Scully, 
Lucy Smedley, Haunah Smith, Bessie Traop, 
Charlotte Weteran, Florence Windle, Vir- 
ginia Worstall, Lauretta Yerkes. 

MIL1TAKX DILI,. 

Those who participated in the graceful 
and entrancing movements of the "Military 
Diill" were the following :— 

Itobcrla S. Clark, Chamberaburg. 

Cora Brooks, Plymouth, Mout. county. 

Ella Sculley, Newtown, Bucks couuty. 

Lizzie M. Leigh, Fallsingtou, Bucks Co. 

Florence M. Biosius, Chatham, ChestorCo, 

iiciln O. Blctlcr, Ansolma, Chester county. 

Adelaide Johnsou, Berwyu, Chester county. 

Mabel Felty, Pino Grove, Schuylkill Co. 

Mary Sharpless, West Chester. 

Adele M. Baily, Corinne, Chester county. 

Lizzie M. Kirk, Forest Grove, Bucks Co. 

Manie Lenhy, Avoudale, Chester county. 

Hannah Mendeuhall, West Chester. 

Anua B. Lilly, North Wales, Mont. Co. 

Florouco M. Detwilor,Norristown,Mout.Co. 

Auuie It. Hughes, Manoa, Delawaro Co. 

Emma Ellwanger, Pliaenixvillo, Choster Co. 

M. Ida Pnlmer, Doe Hun. Chester couuty. 

Marion Kakestraw, Christiana, Lan. Co. 

Essie Wyun, West Chester. 

Katie Carroll, Bethshcda, Lancaster Co. 

Mary Woodward, West Chester. 

Anna Davis. Willioms Corner, Lan. Co. 

L.Adalaide Moffit.RichlaudCeutre.BacksCo 

The various marchiugs were executed with 
o snap and precision which elicited coutinual 
applause. These girls wore cream-colored 
neckties, aud their military bearing would 
have niado the famous West Point cadets take 
to tho woods. 

AESTHETIC GYMNASTICS. 

Those who took part _ in tho posings 
aud tableaux in the extraordinary and special 
"Aesthetic Gymnastics," with Greek cos- 
tumes, were : Mibscs Charlotte Bishop, Lillie 
Hemphill, Sara DeHaven, Lilian Wolleiton, 
Ada and Mary Comwell and Marie Jackson, 
all of Westchester. 

The Blow, graceful movements of the pretty 
girls as they swayed their bodies to and fro 
and waved their part'ally bared arms upward 
and downward was of marvellous effect. The 
various posings were most beautiful and 
round after round of vociferous applause 
followed Ihe exhibition.and the girls respond- 
ed to the encore. The class wore long flow- 
ing white robes after the style of the Greek 
women. 

Then followed an intricnto grnnd march by 
tho eighty girls who participated inthosov- 
cral classes. Tho various movements evoked 
runch applause. 

Dr. aud Mrs. Ehiugor wero the recipients of 
hearty cougratulutious over the very success- 
ful ir,anuor in which the entertainment had 
been planned aud carried out. 

Among tho guests were: Miss Anna Mc- 
Nair, Director of Physical Culture at Bryu 
Mawr College for Young Ladies; Miss Ida 
Hamaker, ot the Friends' Gymnasium, Phila- 
delphia; liliss Belle Flemiug, of Millersville 
Normal Sohool Gymnasium, and Miss Filioia 
Thomas, of Westtown Friends' Boarding 
School. 



22 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



12 MARCH 1891 



Music for tlie l. mud March. 

The Normal Hand again kindly furnished 
music for the girls' grand march in the 
gymnasium at fivo o'clock on Wednesday 
nflcraoon. Over one hundred girls were in 
line, and their movements were directed by 
Dr. Ehinger. The running tract wai iillcd 
on nil sides with visitors, among whom were 
n few gentleman. Many pretty ami dillicnlt 
ficn res were executed and they called forth 
admiring comments from the gallery. The 
intervals between the selections were filial 
with piano music hy Mrs. Khinger. At the 
rinse of the march the girls gave II hearty 
round of npplnuse to the musicians in the 
gallery. This is probably the Inst time the 
I'lliul will furnish uiiiHiu lor Hie limreli this 
1 'rlii. 

17 NOVEMBER 1891 

'I'd PInrch for tin- Tenchrr*. 
On Wednesday afternoon at o'clock the 
girls ol the Normal School will have a grand 
inarch in tlio gymnasium. The directors, 
l>r. and Mrs. Khinger, havo planned this 
in order that those attending the Teachers' 
Institute mgy have something of interest to 
nee down at the school. There will he an 
unusually iong line ol girls in the march and 
Dr. Khinger has been drilling the leaders in 
a number of new and very pretty figures. 



19 NOVEMBER 1891 



N0RMA1ITES PERFORM 

7 MARCH 1892 



HIGH KICKING, JUMPING AND 
H BAR EXERCISES- 



TUB UUAXH MAIll'll. 

The Normal ui r i, PUasantly Entertain 

Ihe Visiting Tcnrlirn. 

The Normal School girls, underline direc 
lion of Dr. and Mrs. Khinger, gave a benefit 
grand march to the veiling Chester county 
teachers on Wednesday afternoon at live 
o clock, in the gymnasium. The atlernoon 
session ol the institute closed soon after tour 

clock and ample time was thus afiorded to 
reach the gymnasium before the beginning 

01 the march. A large number of the 
borough s citizens mingled with the teachers 
and the running track was crowded five ami 
mx deep with a patient and interested aud. 
if nee. Down stairs many people gained ad- 
nilttance lo Ihe gymnasium-floor and'stood 
plat'fV " W&llB ° r foand P laoe8 "Poi the 

At the beginning of the march nearly I7fj 
girls formed the line; they were led by Misses 
Bessie Trapp and Bessie Hughes, aud a 
number of the girls in the front carried small 
American (lags. They marohed to the niusio 
ol the piano, given by Mrs. Khintror, and tho 
lino wns directed by Dr. Khinger. A nun] 
her of beautiful figures were well executed 
by the mnrchers.but owing to the unexpected 
length of the line, several of the new ones 
had to be omitted. The girls broke ranks 
at about 0.40. 



15 DECEMBER 1891 

Th. Mlrla' <i.„„,| ni....!.. 

Oil Monday atlernoon at 5 o'clock ilhc 
t rls ol the Normal Schaol. including sev- 
eral from the town class, executed a grand 
march in lll.o gymnasium under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Khinger. Mrs. Ehinger fur- 
nished the piano music to which they 
marched and the sixtyfour girls i„ |?^ 
formed a number of pretty figures. Misses 
Hughes and Trapp were the leader* and a 
number ol „sitor« witnessed and admired 
the marching from therunniug track. 

17 DECEMBER 1891 

Aryan Special Meeting. 
On Saturday evening the Aryau Society 
ol tho Normal School will give a special 
meeting in the auditorium, for which aolive 
preparation Is beiug made. Miss Ilellowell 
is assisting the members of Ihe aooiety in 
their preparation of a fine programme, of 
wbicu some of the attractive features will ba 
a dramatic representation, two readings, a 
drill by some of the girlst uuder the direc- 
tion ol Mrs. Khinger, and excellent music. 
Some of the costumes to be worn by the par. 
tirinants in the drama will be hired in Phil- 
adelphia for the occasion. This will be tho 
last meeting in 'yi and will fitly mark tho 
close of the year. 



The Exhibition Intersperssd With 

Muslc-Acrobatlc Work-Elephant 

and Potato Races. 



Tho first public exhibition which the 
Norranlilcs have given in a gyinnastio Hue 
since their splendid building wai erected 
was held last evening before nn audience 
that crowded the gallery and six hundred 
seats on the main floor. The excellence of 
tho performance was a tribute to the thor- 
oughness of the work done by Dr. aud 
Mrs. Ehinger, and n proof of what can be 
done iu a very short time iu a well- 
equipped gymnasium. 

The exhibition was opened by about 
forty of the smallest tots iu the gymna- 
sium, ranging from- five to nine yearain 
age— the girls dressed iu white dresses 
with blue sashes, and the boys iu white 
jackets and dark knickerbockers— led by 
little Sarah Philips, who kept exact time 
to tbo music played by Mrs. Ehinger. 
iTieir bowing, hopping, skipping aud 
other movements were beautiful. The 
older Model students went through simi- 
lar movements and also gave a dumb bell 
drill. 

Thirty-two young men, dressed in tennis 
shoes, dark pantaloons adorned with two 
broad, white stripes, aud neglige shirts 
with red ties, came upon the floor as the 
Model pupils went out, and gave a Tery 
creditable exhibition of elementary mili- 
tary marching, followed by equally skilful 
dumb bell and Indian club drills. 

Otto Monahau's club swinging was the 
most skillful thiug done during the even- 
ing. T'hn applause was almost continuous 
as he wound aud twUted the clubs in 
intricate knots and circles uutil the eye 
could not follow tho movements of his 
hands, much less the movements of the 
clubs. And with it all he had that which 
Uio professional club swinger most de- 
sires, perfeot equilibrium, and a lack of 
any swaying of the body. 

At the conclusion of the light gymnas- 
tics Misses Elmore Kervoy and Marian 
Jones played a piano duet. During the 
light gymnastics Mrs. Ehiuger played the 
plauo, and while Ihe heavy gymnastics 
were under way, Messrs. Kiczer, Walters 
and Hartman played. 

HEAVY OYMSASTIC8. 

The contest in high jumping from 
spring board was very exciting. Bpauld- 
ing Long, Charles Rice. Murton Gregory, 
Walter Davis, Mcnno Mover and Thomas 
Massey entered. Lively jigs nnd polkas 
were played while the jumpers contested. 
The pole was pluced low u» first, aud as it 
went up inch by inch, the contestants 
dropped off one by one. Finally it lay 
between Itiee and Massey. Both got Over 
7 feet 6 inches, and neither could go 
higher . And so it was a draw. 

Otta F. Monahan, Eugene Buckmau, 
Lionel Darlington, Charles Hice, Snocente 
Moriere, George Burlew, Charles Gib9ou, 
Albert Davis, Wm. Kin/.er, Charles Philips, 
Albert Laughman aud Charles Walton, 
took part in the horizoutal bar exercises. 
All performed skillfully and nlargcr num- 
ber of tho boys performed on tho vaulting 
buck. 

THE POTATO HACK. 

Tho potato race was hotly contested. 
There were seven rows of potatoes, six- 
teen potatoes in a row, placed a yard apart 
A basket stood at the end of each row and 
the rules provided that each fellow must 
pick up one potato at n time aud put it in 
the basket. After a very lively scramble, 
Lionel Darlington came out first with 
Thomas Massey a good second. The other 
contestants were. Spaulding Long. Charles 
Gibson, Henry Coukle Leuard Slack aud 
Coleman Beaster. 



Amos Kinzlcr, Edwin Deliver and 
Merritt Mover entered the high kicking 
contest. Hillyer won, touching the leath- 
er cosily at a height of eight feet five 
inches. 

Tho remaining cf^the exercises were 
principally ludiduul work, in which Otto 
Monahan, Lionel Darlington, Eugene 
Buckmau and others, performed some skill- 
feats 

Spence Buckmau dressed in regulation 
clown costumes, was very funny and 
good in the performance of clownish 
tricks. 

'Ihe appearance of the clown was a sur- 
jirisc lint only to the audience, hut to tho 
boys themselves, and they too were much 
entertained by Ins funny motions. 

Tho club swinging by Otto Monahan, the 

SRsihiant ai ihe i- \ iiniii' iu hi at the Norm il 
School, on HaluruHy evening, was especially 
line nnd a splendid exemplification ol the, 
art. The movements were most carefully 
arianctd witli a visw of showing all the lead- 
ing circles and combinations known in club 
swinging and answered every test ol merit. 
The) first movements were comparatively 
simple and these led up Btep by step to 
more dillicnlt and complicated ones, finally 
culminating in some ol the most difficult 
movements which can be executed with the 
clubs. n -.""( 

The changes Irom oDe class of movements 
lo another were accomplished with an ease 
and grace rarely seen in such exhibitions. 
Every movement was executed with the 
greatest precision, and Mr. Monahau's style 
was unusually good, as during m6st of the 
movements he stood as motionless as a statue, 
performing them with his arms only. 

This is considered one ol Ihe principal 
tests of club swinging, is every unnecessary 
movement of the body greatly detracts from 
the finished appearance which a good club 
swinger tries to cultivate. 

All but the last class of movements were 
perlorraed upon the right and leftside with 
eijnal lacilily; only the difficult and oomplex 
"follows" were done upon one side, and we 
are informed that these were performed on 
both sides in practice, but were found too 
timome coming at the close of a difficult ex- 
hibition like this and were omitted on the 
left side. 

It required between seven and eigr* 
minutes to swing the lull series. 



23 MARCH 1892 

i;j mnnilt, i for the Visitors. 

Among the places in the itinerary prepared 
for Ihe Philadelphia visitors to West Chester 
on Thursday is the Normal School gymn- 
asium, which is to he visited between eleven 
anil twelve o'clock in the morning. Regular 
elms work will ho shown there, and for this 
purpose Dr. and Mrs. Khinger hnvo arranged 
a picked clnseol forty of members from all 
ol the six classes ol girls in the gymnasium. 
They will execute a ilumhell chorus, tho 
ring reries aud a number of other exercises 
and marching hlcp". It will ba regular class 
woi k, but very pretty. 



18 JUNE 1892 



A I.) iiiiuii rl. lull!. 
On Tuesday atlernoon at half-past fonr 
o'clock the Normal School boys will give a 
drill in the gymnasium under the direction 
of Dr. Ehinger. It will be an interesting 
exercice, though not intended as an exhi- 
bition of special work, but only represents 
regular class work. All iuterested in 
gymnastics are invited to be present to wit- 
nets tiie exercise. 



22 JUNE 1892 



The Oynmiiilir. Drill. 
On Tuesday afternoon nt. I ,;o o'clock a 

very" pretly drill, lusting hall an hour, was 
Riven in the gymnasium at the Normal 
School by the hoys. There were thirty two 
boys in line, and they were directed in their 
movements by Dr. Ehinger, while Mrs 
Khinger played a piano accompaiumenl. A 
number of very pretty figures with Indian 
clubs and wands were executed, and applause 
was geuerously given from tho audieuce of 
hoys and girls from the school and visitors, 
who occupied the running trrick as agallcry.' 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 23 



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Manager Brady's Baseball Association 



Th e Daily Repu blican. 

MONDAY. MARCH 7. 1892. 

NORMALITESIN BURNT CORK 



THEY ACT FOlt TDK HA IX TEAM 



Lonpafeer and Warns the End nIcn-Mon- 

alian's Excellent Club Swin^luc »a 

Much Ailmireil. 



Manager Brady and his assistants in the 
Normal School Base Ball Association gave 
an excellent amateur minstrel performance 
in the auditorium of that institution on 
Satnrdiiy night, thereby crowniug them- 
selves with evergreen and netting a nice 
sum for the organization of a good team. 
The audience was of fair size, but not so 
large as is customary at the literary meet- 
ing, to which no autuiss ! charged. 
In full dress suits, regulation wigs aud 
the requisite amount of cork, the members 
of the company made their first appear- 
ance, seating themselves in a semi-circle 
which extended all the way across the 
wide stage. Their opening song was 
"There's a Meeting Here To-night." Then 
Howard F. Brinton sang. "Polly Wolly 
Doodle," with chorus accompainment, 
and A. Beaumont Carpenter followed him 
with a solo "Riding Down from Bangor," 
accompanying himself on the banjo. D. 
Brower Longaker sang the first original 
song, "In the Normal After Ten O'clock 
Night," the company joining in the 
chorus: 

Down at the Normal. 

Here that fearful sound. 
All the students are a BUoriiiR. 
From fourth hail to the around. 
Then came Manager Brady's solo. "Com- 
mitted to the Deep," at the close of which 
the whole troup sang "Massa's in the Cold, 
Cold Ground." 

At intervals- between the songs there 
were many witty sayings which kept the 
audieuce in a happy mood Longaker in 
the part of Tanibo.sustained his reputation 
as afunuy man, and Warren Way rattled 
the bones and cracked his jokes in a man- 
ner to capture the house. A few of the 
witticisms were new. and these were re- 
ceived by the audience with some surprise 
and hesitation, but the old ones, the jokes 
which everybody has known since child- 
hood, brought, forth deafening rounds of 



applause. The time-worn couumdrums, 
mellowed with age, seemed wonderfully 
effectual, as they brought up visions of 
the past childhood days when people 
seemed to have more time for merriment 
thau is now afforded. 

When the minstrels retired at the end of 
the first hour, the piano was turned round 
in order that Mrs. Khringer might play an 
accompanment for Otto Monahau, who 
gave a splendid exhibition of club swing- 
ing. 

Mr. Moua'uan, who is the assistant of Dr. 
Ehinger in the gymnasium, and stands 
head and shoulders above all the students 
in athletic accomplishments, swung the 
clubs for many minutes, first slowly, then 
more rapidly, and slowing up again until 
the music stopped, went through some of 
the most difficult movements without 
ever dropping a club or striking the tw 
together. This was decidedlv the be^t 
number on the program, and as several 
people expressed it, well worth the price 
of admission. At the close of bis perform- 
ance he was presented with a large bou- 
quet of roses and was vigorously encored. 
During the interlude which followed, an 
orchestra consisting of W. Conway LoveCl, 

Sianist; Edward McFadden, violinist, and 
[ermau Boeeker. cornetist, rendered sev- 
eral selections in an enjoyable manner. 

Part second opened with a farce, "Two 
Old Cronies," by Monahan and Longaker, 
who cracked several jokes aud went off 
the stage imitating a brass band. Long- 
aker's imitation of trombone was very 
laughable. They were followed by a quar- 
tette, which sang "Give Me My Own Na- 
tive Isl«." The quartette consisted of 
Messrs. C.irpenter, Hockenberry, Brady 
and Gibson. 

"The Georgetown School," with Howard 
Brinton as teacher, Messrs. lv» 'is. Fred 
Bradv and Gibson as directors, and M 
Way ."Longaker. Monahau, Hambleton, W. 
H. Bradv aud Beidler as pupils, was a 
screamiug success. Longaker, Hambleton 
aud Beidler being dressed as girls, kept 
the audieuce in an uproar, aud Way, who 
took the part of John Bardsley, the boy on 
whom everything was blamed, acted iu 
such a taking manner that he had the sym- 
pathies of the whole house. 

Miss Jennie B. Maris aeouipanied Mr". 
Carpenter's violin solo, "The Spring 
Awakening:" which was well reudered, 
and a farce "My Mother," introduced the 
closing song. "There is a [Normal in the 
Towo." 

^Thensherefttd attendants during the 
'Vg»<ng were Ralob Butler. James Stayer, 

c > ~er Biles and" Charles Rice. 



24 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



"AMULET" NOVEMBER 1892 

Qym^asties ai?d /Ubieties. 

Every one who saw the Senior girls marching, 
on the afternoon the grand march was given for 
the teachers during Institute week, was delighted 
with the military bearing of the members of the 
class, and the splendid exhibition which they gave 
of marching evolutions. We did not think girls 
could be trained to do this kind of work so well. 

The fencing drill given by six young ladies at the 
girls' meeting of the Moore Society, on November 
12, was greatly appreciated by the large audience 
present. We begin to think that girls have more 
military spirit than we had imagined. All the 
members did well, but Miss Ella Mather " capped " 
the climax in the encore. 

Otto Monahan, the assistant instructor in the 
gymnasium, gave an exhihition of club swinging 
at the Assembly Building, on the occasion of the 
first evening's entertainment during the Teacher's 
Institute Course. He made a decided hit, as he 
always does by the graceful manner in which he 
executed the many difficult and complicated move- 
ments. He is an artist with the Indian clubs. 
Mr. Monahan's work is another example of what 
perseverance will do. Two years ago last Octo- 
ber when he came to the Normal, he had never 
done any gymnastic work. 

On Friday, December i6th, the boys of the Nor- 
mal School will give a public gymnastic entertain- 
ment, to which an admission fee of 25 cents will be 
charge The entertainment will be for the bene- 
fit of the gymnasium, to raise a fund to purchase 
some new apparatus. 

The directors of the gymnasium, wishing to 
procure some improved apparatus which has just 
come out, and not caring to ask the board of 
Trustees for assistance when they have so recently 
fitted the gymnasium in such a generous manner, 
decided with the co-operation of the students to 
try to earn the money themselves. Some time 
after Christmas the girls will give an entertain- 
ment for the same purpose. And before the end 
of the winter term an entertainment will be given 
in which both the girls and boys will take part. 
Probably no admission fee will be charged to this. 




4^S» 




fff9 

1889 BASEBALL TEAM 

Fred Brady (#9) Manager and Player 



■ "W&"-i 





Fred Brady 

Writer, Director, Interlocutor 

Baseball Team, Minstrel Show 

11 March 1893 




11, @ 3 I 9 S2E2S$r®222B 



Is prepared to give lessons in Plain and Fancy Swimming, 
also in Floating, Diving, "Treading Water," etc. 



TERMS— IN SMALL CLASSES: 

Boys from 5 to 15 years of age (eight lessons), - - $2.50 

Boys over 15, and Men (eight Lessons), .... 3.50 

Private Lessons (eight lessons), ,---"- 5.00 

Swimming Hours, 11 to 12 a. m., and 5 to t> p. in. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 25 



13 DECEMBER 1892 



The Normsl'i "Gym'' Entertainment. 
Tbe entertainment to be given on next 
Friday evening In the "tljm" at the Normal 
School under the directorship of Professor 
Khluger and his efficient wife promises to be 
a fine one. The boys In the Normal School, 
with two .classes from the Model Depart- 
ment, will be tbe actors, and they are well 
trained for tbe occasion. Everybody should 
go, ns the sum of '2j cents admission is for 
the purpose of purchasing some new and 
needed paraphernalia for that lustlluttou. 
Tickets can be obtained at Rupert's. ' 

—On Tuesday afternoon and evening the 
Normal 6tudents secured their tickets for the 
gymnastic entertainment on Friday eveniug. 
To accommodate the-visitors on that occasion, 
chairs are to be placed as close as comfort- 
able, on the running track, in addition to the 
rows ot seats which will be arrange^ on tsvo 
sides of the main floor. 



KM 1 . -' ' i 1 ill . 

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Department of Physical Education. 

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Normal Gymnasium, 

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The fall of 1 892 saw also the intensive preparations for the 
first gymnastic show under the leadership of Dr. Ehinger. 
Enthusiasm was at high pitch during the practice sessions. 
Three arc lights were installed on a rental basis and platforms 
with chairs were placed on one end ol the gym floor. The boys 
had white stripes sewn on their dark gym trousers for the 
show. A capacity crowd attended. This first program set the 
precedent for an annual show the profits from which would be 
used to the benefit of the students. The program on December 
1 6, 1 892 starting at 7:30 P.M. was as follows: 




fc 



rogram. 

PART I. 
Light Gymnastic- 
i Free Gymnastics. nl Division Model Shutntb 

2. Prec Gymnastics and Ounih Hell Prill. jd /V, /</i'w Mm'il .'itwifrHt. 1 . 
-, Marching by Class o( Thirty two Young Men 
4. Club Swinging by Class of Thirty-two Young Men. 

5 Punib Rell Drill by Class of Thirty two Young Men 

6. Club Swinging. Olio Afmakati 

MUSIC 
Piano Duett. - - .Watt Jouts aid Ktrvty 

Mrs. C. F. EhinRtr arrompanist for l.icH tlmmaslirs: tftssrx. Kinder, 
U'n/trrt, and Hartmart for Htavy (>\Mna<tirs. 

PART II. 
Heavy Gymnastics 
1 Contest ill High Jumping from Spring Board 
; Class Kxercises on Horizontal Bar 

.V Class Kxercises on the Vaulting Buck. 

4 Potato Race 

5. Contest in High Kicking 

6 Class Exercises on Vaulting Horse 

7 Grouping with Iron Wands 

8. Acrobatic Work— elementary series in. Elephant Race. Individ 
n a I \\ ork. 



26 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



17 DECEMBER 1892 



Gymnastic Entertainment 

At the West'Chester State Normal School- 
Some Splendid Athletic Aorobatio Exer- 
cises Given in Excellent Manner— A 
Successful Event— A Very 
Large Audience Present. 

" Bun ! Jump ! Swim ! 
West Chester Gyin." - 

The above yell of the pupils of the Was 
Chester State Normal School ffe-eehoec 
throughout the handsome and finely-equip- 
ped gymnasium Friday night, at the colcIu- 
sion of a most successful and delightful 
exhibition of the advancement of physical 
culture, giveu by a number of Normal and 
Model school students under the supervision 
of Dr. C. E. Ebinger, the Director of the De- 
partment of Physical Education at the school, 
m the presence of about seven hundred siu- 
dentR and townspeople who heartily applaud- 
ed the performances of the several classes. 

Promptly at 7.30 p. m., Mrs. C. E. Ehinger, 
assistant in the gymnasium, struck the first 



.Normdr TL. Heaton, Norwood, Montgomery 
county ;Leonard M. Slack, Bichboto, Bucks 
county, Frank P. Brogan, Drifton, Luzerne 
connty;George C. Luft, Obold, Berks county; 
Harry A. Kotz, Sandt'slEddy, Noilhampton 
county; William C. Kauffman, New Hope, 
Bucks county; Spence W. Buckman, Peun 
Valley, Bucks county. 

The boys were attired in dark trousers 
with broad white stripes down the legs; light- 
colored neglige shirts, red neckties, and dark- 
colored gymnasium shoes. They received 
considerable applause as they m rapid suc- 
cession executed their .marchings, wheelings, 
and other military movements. The class 
were then provided with Indian clubs and 
gave a splendid exhibition, which pleased the 
spectators, after which there was a drill by 
the class with the dumb bells, which also 
was applauded. ,.,... - T j- 

Otto F. Monahans exhibition of Indian 
club swinging was marvelous and proficient 
and he was cheered to the echo. The perform- 
ance-was a rich treat. 

Misses Marion B. Jones and Eleanor B. 
Kervey, of West Chester, gave a nicely ren- 
dered piano duett which greatly pleased the 
assemblage. .... . • , - , 

Part second opened with "contest in high 



assistant m trie gymnasium, shuck me nrsi raiiMcuuuupcuou ■ u — jf» 
notes of a pretty march upon the piauo, and, jumping from the spring board. 
w^t.,,^!,- f „;,.tt-_tTi>r» *nfo fi-r»m thfi MnHftl fi-i*>c topta : Charles ±uce, Jilurti 



instantly tuirty-two tots from the Model 
School headed by little Sara Philips, :> 
daughter of Principal Philips, marched into' 
the main floor from the basement wheie they, 
had been marshalled by their teachers. A, 
great storm of applause went up from the, 
students who were seated upon chairs on the 
running traqk or balcony and the delighted 
townspeople who occupied seats upon the 
elevated platform at the south end of the, 
main floor. The little giris were attired in 
white drc sses with blue sashes and they made 
n charming appearance. They gave an ex- 
hibition of free gycjftas'k'S, which. metiteS- 
thiV.coutiuuous applause which greeted al- 
most every movement, especially fine being . 
the shoulder movements and the skipping | 
act. < . i 

After the smaller \ 
children had taken j 
seat* reserved for them I 
uenr the north end, I 
anothei class of older 
girls and boys from the 
Mode! School marched 
in and took intervals 
in extended formation 
before the spectators. 
Iheu exercises included 
a number of fanciful 
movements with the 
feet, arms and bodies, 
followed by a number 
of pretty exercises with 
rinnib-bell^ including 
ihe "anvil chorus" pro- 
duced by striking to- 
gether the dumb-bells 
in rhythm to the notes 
of the piano, and was 
very nicely rendered. 
Amid considerable ap- 
plause tbis class fin- 
ished its work with a march embracing 
skipping, hopping and dancing. As they took 
seats near the eastern end, the class of thirty- 
two Normal boys filed in and formed a per- 
fect front in the following order : 

Aaron S. England, Brandywme Summit; 
D. Coleman Beasten, Cecilton, Maryland; 
Eugene BuckmaD,Penn Vidley.Bucks county: 
Albert Davis, West Chester; W. Harry 
Gunkle, Frazer, Chester county; George 
Burlew, Mifflin ; Walter W. Davis, West Ches- 
ter; Harry T. Smith, Phceuixville; Charles 
A. Bice, Beedsville, Mifflin county; E. Dallett 
Hemphill, jr., West Chester; William C. Far- 
rell, West Chester; John F. Schall, Dale, 
Berks county; Balph Entriken, Malvern, 
Chester county; Eugene Stover, Tohickon, 
Bucks county; Elmer S. Miller, Font, Ches- 
ter county; Bobert C. Evans, West Chester; 
Charles G. PhiliDs, Atglen, Chester county: 
Charles K. Gibson, Odesfa, Del.; Henry 
Conkle, Wayne, Delaware county; Walter 
Yeatman, Londongrove. Chester county; 
Spaulding Long. West Chester; Luther fi, 
Etheaxar, "oith Wnkb, M^ufgoir.civ couutj ; 
G. Leon Lapp, Malvern, Chester county; 0. 
Vincent Hart, flctboro, Montgomery county; 
Harvey Cooper, Point Pleasau I.Bucks county; 



The 





es were : Charles Bice, Murton Gregory, 
Spaulding Long, Walter Davis, Menno 
Moyer, Thomas Massey. This event proved 
very interesting as the standard was rapidly 
raised The contest closed in a tie between 
Charles Bice and Thomas Massey at seven 
feet, five inches. . 

Class exercises on the Hori- 
zontal Bar. This event was 
greatly enjoyed and applauded 
the class circling the bar in 
various positions, and giving 
numerous difficult "snap 
offs." The exercises conclud- 
ed with individual work by 
Dr. Ehinger, Monahan, Buck- 
man, Darlington. Monera. Those wno con 
stituted the class were i 

Otta F. Monahan, Eugene Bnokman, 
Lionel Darlington, Charles Bice, Tnocects- 
Moriera, George Burlew, Charles Gibson, 
Albert Davis, Wm. Kinzer, Charles Philips, 
Albert Laughman, Charles Walton, Connie 
Herron. 

VAULTING BUCK EXERCISES. 

Otto F. Monahan, Eugene Buckman, Lio- 
nel Darlington, Francis Hall man, Charles 
Bice Harvey Cooper, Connie Herrou, Albert 
Laughman, Vincent Hart, Forrest Fluck, 
D Coleman Beasten, Charles Philips, Joseph 
Lawrence, Irwin Plum, Edwin Hellyer,Wm. 
Kinzer J. V. Gallagher, Balnh Butler, Edgar 
Butler' Tnocente Moriera, Walter D^vis, 
Murton Gregory, Warren Andres, Frank 
Walters Albeit Davis, Bobert Evans, Wm. 
Hemphill, jr., Harry Gunkle. 

This class gave some fane exhibitions in 
vaulting, going over with one hand, the back- 
ward vault, etc. 

POTATO BA0E. 

Lionel Darlington,Spaulding Long, Ch arles 
Gibson Henry Kunkle, Laonard Slack, 
Coleman Beasten Thomas Massey. 

Tais was the most exciting feature of the 
entertainment, at many times most 
of the audience standing and cheering 
their favorite. Sixteen potatoes were placed 
od6 yard apart and the contestants were 
obliged to pick up the potatoes sindy and 
deposit them in a basket at the eud of the row. 
Lionel Darlington, sou of Francis J. Dailing- 
ton, of West Cftester, finished first by the 
fraction of a second, hard pushed by Thomas 
Ma'sey of Mafsey, Delaware. These two 
bovs were nip-aud-tuck from the word "go 
to the fiuish. MaJ. Mcduley and a score of 
fiieuds were loudly cheering young Darling- 
ton and when he reached for his last potato, 
i m his excitement and eagerness be fumbled 
■ i'ae tuber. Massey was comu e downh s row 
with a mighty effort, and both boys secured 
their sixteenth potato m the same 



instant and amid thundering hand-clapping 
and yelling the two leaders made a dash for 
their 'goals. Massey was almost winded, and 
before reaching his basket fell almost ex- 
hausted and Darlington deposited his last po- 
tato in the basket before Massey could crawl 
to his. 

HIGH KICKING CONTEST. 

Charles Bice, Edwin Hellyer,Amo3 Kinzer, 
Menuo Mover. . 

Cbailes Bice injured his foot in a previous 
contest and was withdrawn. The contest 
was a close one and resulted in a tie between 
Edward Hellyer and Amos Kinzer at eight 
teet five inches. 

VAULTING H0BSE EXERCISE. 

Otto F. Monahan, Lionel Darlington. 
Eugene Buckman, Charles Bice, Connie 
Herron, Charles Gibson, Coleman Beasten, 
Forrest Fluck, Charles Philips, Albert Davis, 
Joseph Lawrence, Tnocente Moreira, George 
Burlew, Elmer Miller, Thomas Massey, 
Bobert Cowan, Edgar Sensenich, Harvey 
Cooper. 

GROUPING WITH WANDS. 

Dr. C. E. Ehinger, Otto Monahan, Lionel 
Darlington, Eugene Buckman, _ Harvey 
Cooper. . ., , . 

This was something new in athletic exercises 
hereabouts and every movement was heartily 
applauded as the performers posed in novel 
positions, employing strength, dexterity and 
graceful nese. 

ACROBATIC WORK. 

OttoF. Monahan, Lionel Darlington, Eu- 
gene Buckman, Charles Bice, George Burlew, 
Cbarles GibsoD, William Hemphill, jr., Albert 
Davis, Connie Herron. Charles Walton, Wil- 
1 ham Kinzer, Thomasl Massey, Francis Hall- 
I man, Bobert CowaD, Joseph Lawrence, 
! Tnocente Moriera. „' __ .'j 

Individual work_by_Qito_JE,-MoEai!Say 
LloneTiiailihgton and Eugene Bnokman. 

This work in- 
cluded hand and 
head stands, 
tumbling, flip- 
flaps, elephant 
race,clown work 
by Spence Buck- 
man; mid air 
sommers aul ts 
bj Eugene 
Buckman; con- 
tortion acts by Lionel D^li^ton; walking 
on hands and head stands by Otto F. Mona- 

ai About ten o'clock the performance ended 
with leap-frog movements by the class. 

It is intended to give a similar entertain- 
neut some time next month, when the pretty 
formal girls will perform some woudertul 

Tbe'proceeds will be for the benefit of the 
?ymnasium,to be used in purchasing new ap- 
laratus. 





DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 27 



8 FEBRUARY 1893 



The dood Work or tile drill 

The several exercises to be given by the 
Normal girls on Friday evening are very at- 
tractive. In the heavy gymnastics there 
will be forae excellent examples of work on 
the parallel bars and in rope climbing. The 
drills with rings, Indian clubs and other 
exercises are well done, and among the most 
nttrnctive features will be the exercises in 
marching by twenty-four girls, in which 
tbey form a number of figures, including a 
diamond, a hollow square, a cross, etc. The 
attractive grouping of the members of the 
town class will be very pretty, and those 
engaging in it have taken much pleasure in 
the practice for the exhibition, having met. 
• ' <he bouses of the members to accomplish it.- 



9 FEBRUARY 1893 



Tlie Gymnastic Kiuiiilttou. 
So great has been the demand for tickets 
to the girls' exhibition In the Normal School 
gymnasium on Friday evening that the re- 
served seat tickets were sold veryrapldl v yes- 
terday after being placed at the disposal. of 
the people, and the demand was renewed to- 
day, so that before noon all were gone. More 
tlcgets have been printed, and extra chairs 
will be carried In, so that visitors may all be 
accommodated comfortably. The doors will 
open at 7 o'clock and the performance will 
begin very promptly at 7.30, and the several 
exercises will follow each other very closely, 
with no delay and only one Intermission, 
flhlchwlll be occuDiedwlth music. 



10 FEBRUARY 1893 



—The leaders In this evening's heavy work 
In the gymnastic exhibition will be Misses 
Stella Harrison and Anna R. Hughes. Miss 
Harrison has a record In the gymnasium of 
six feet one Inch In Jumping with the aid of 
a spring-board, wnich has never been 
equaled by any of the girls. There will, 
however, be no Jumping tnlB evening. As 
In the former entertainments, the proceeds 
of this evening's entertainment will bensed 
In the purchase of new apparatus. The 
large new hoops used by the Seniors were 

f)urchased with part of the proceeds of the 
ast exhibition, on December 16th. 



10 FEBRUARY 1893 



The Gimniilio Kzhlbltlon. 

The progrnmraes for the girls' gymnastic 
exhibition In tbe Normal School gymuas- 
lum this evening are very neat. They beir 
two cuts of elrls ready for work, one on tin 
front and another on the back. Irxtha latter 
a yoKlllon Is taken which will be mod this 
evenlDg In the exercises with wooden rlngi. 
'the programme will be as follows: 

PART I. 

Music— Piano <Juet, 

Miss Marls and Miss Van Etteo. 
Free gymnastics, 

first Division Model pupils. 
Free gymuasllcs, 

Second Division Model pupils. 
Club swinging, 

Claf-s of thirty two young ladles. 
Eicrcists with wooden rlDgs, 

Class of thlrty-slx youug ladles. 
Heavy woik, 

1'aiallel bar and rope climbing. 

PABT II. 

Mutlc— Flano duet. 

Muss Marls and Miss VanJitten. 
Club swinging; — - — - — «- 

Miss Bishop and Miss HamLlton. 
Hood drill, 

Youug ladles of the Senior Class. 
Military drill, , 

Class of twenty-four young ladies. 
iEstbetlc gymnastics— - 
1. Kxerclses for poise and grace. 
2- J'osture groupings, representative of: 

Longor, mischief, listening, surprise, 

expectancy, fear, grief, suppllcaUon, 

triumph. 
Youug ladies of tbe town class. 
Urand march. 



Not to be outdone, the girls were planning their own 
gymnastic demonstration, and on Friday evening February 10, 
1893, their first program was unveiled. This was directed by 
Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger and included the following: 

Department of Physical Education. 

».~l I P„.r, , M,|I.- \..riilill Sri |. 

tti -I I li.-l. i. 1'ji. 

G^nwasfic ^nterteioroent 

Normal Gymnasium, 

9ridatj 6ver?ir?g, 9ebr»tiapy 10th. 1833, 

AT 7 30 O'CLOCK. 




/VMrWtA l<" Iff U ",/)/ ..//*. 



/,■ I. >i*rj in JlirnAtlifirc 



ppogpam. 



Mn-1. - I'i.iiu. IHU'tt. 

1 1" «- I '.\ nni.islir-,. 

l-'rxt i .\ urn rstics. 

v lull Swinging. 

i \i-i. i-.isu.tli Wooden Kin^s, 

lb i, Work. 



PART i 

Ui \faris and Miss \'an IHlen. 

1 1 i.l Division Model I'nfSil, 

Strand Itr.isio. Mtnlil I'npils 

Class of 'I'liirty-litV Yoitug /.tufas 

( lass of 7 hirtv-six ) OMni* I .ndtt > 

Parallel litiis and Hope {.'limbing 



• . I /■! Hit- Seniors ;.ere fturchtl td ..ilit Jntft of' Iftt' proceeds of the e.v- 
,":"' lieeem/ier l6, iftt/f 



Mu-.ii' -I'iiinu Duett. 
i Club S\\ inking, 
■ Ho.,,, Drill 
-, Milil.m Drill. 



PART II. 

.I/us Mans and Miss Can litltit. 

Miss liishop and Miss Hamilton 

Young I '.adits of the Senior Class 

Class of Thirl Y-four Young 1 Mtiies 



4 .-Ve-.tlirtic (fviunnstica — 

I Kxi-M*.iscs for Poise- ami ('.race. 

.• Posture Groupings, representative of: haiignor, Mischief, Listening, 
Surprise, Kxpecloncy, l-'ear. t'.ri. i Supplication, Triumph 

Young Ladies of the Ttrh'n Class 

; ('.rami Marcll 

The highlight of the program was the aesthetic gymnastics 
in the Delsarte system presented by members of the town 
class. The girls wore white flowing dresses with Greek "key" 
borders. Their powdered hair with a white filet binding made 
them appear like statues in the several postures assumed. A 
tableau or grouping of figures was posed to show total 
lacial-l«)dy expression. These included languor, mischief, 
listening, surprise, expectancy, grief, fear, supplication and 
iiuimph. So enthusiastically were these "Greek" statues 
received that they were recalled to do a complete encore of 
their number. Greek culture had arrived! 

Dr. bhinger led eighty girls in a grand march for the finale. 
Ilns lotal program was the first time in the history of the 
town thai such an exhibition involving many young 
costumed women had been presented. 



28 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



GIRL GYMNASTS. 

T11E AORMAL GIRLS' FINE EXHIBITION 

OF WORK. 

11 FEBRUARY 1893 

1 I rr Knfcrtain an Imntcnia Aadtence 
In Hie Uymnaslum, and Astontili 
Tli«lr Visitors With TUelr Proficiency 
In Free tirmnilltri, Clnti Iwltixlnj;, 
Military niovemeiili, Hope Climbing, 
Kxcrt'lici on Ilia Parallel Hart, KCo. 



East evening tlic girls of Die Normal 

School v\ 1 1 1 1 those w I mpwsettio class fruin 

the lown gave an exhibition of work in the 
fine big gymnasium which in its character 
and manner of execution was one of the 
most beautiful ot the many entertainments 
to which the school treats its trienda. It 
was a compnniou to the gymnastic entertain- 
ment Riven by the boys on the evening of 
December lfi, 'U2, and although of necessity 
very ilillereut from that one, yet tho ar- 
rangement of Ibe two programmes 
was such as to place the boys' and 
girls' work in competition and comparison, 
and many of the visitors in their compli- 
ments and praise compared the two enter- 
tainments favorably to the girls. Their 
work was mere unusual and caused surprise 
tn many who havo not observed closely tho 
(mining given them in the gymnasium, and 
in nil respects w hcrccniniiariaou was possible 
the ir exhibition showed equal or greater d<>. 
velopinent of muscle and strength anil wise 
use of nerve force thau the boys displayed. 
while such things are natural to boys ami 
expected from tlicm, while they are rather 
the result of careful training and instruction 
in physical culture in the girls, and show a 
rapid advance in that direction and a wise 
development of their powers. 




The audience which assembled to wilnpss 
the exercises was on immense one, and prob- 
ably numbered u \any less than a thou- 
sand people. The tijdeuts accompanied by 
their hall teachers occupied the running 
track which served as a gallery, anil this 
part of the building was entirely tilled. The 
south portion of the main tloor was tilled as 
at the former entertainment with tiers of 
raised scnls upon which chairs were placed 
close together. There were many mure of 
these scats than on the boys' evening, and 
they sold rapidly this week as reserved seats, 
w bile rows of extra chairs were placed along 
the rust side of the room. All were 
speedily occupied, ami every inch ol sealing 
space was used, and still thero were people 
standing alorjg the side and in the doorways. 
'J ho students who took part in the exercises 
were stated on the mats, on chairs and 
benches placed along the sides, facing the 
audience. In every particular the euter- 
tninnji nt was a complete success, and many 
were the congratulations showered npon Dr. 
em) 11 rs. Ehinger and on tin girls at the 
close of the evening. 



Till: KXIIIIIITION. 

The exercises begun very promptly at 7 ': I 
o'clock, with a piano duet by Mis«cs Maris 
and Van Ellen. Then the hrst division of 
the Mcdel School children, composed of the 
Ihe little people, marched in and, takingtheir 
places, executed a number of very pretty 
movements in free gymnnsticp, under the 
direction of Dr. Ehinger, while ihe piano ac- 
companiment was played by Mrs. Khinger. 
Following the little people the older Mold 
Heboid pupils, to the number of thirt\ I'mir, 
look Iheir places, and nl.-.j gave an cxhhitiim 
in free gvmiiiisiics, The movements of both 

companies were unite dill'crcnl from lii 

given by lliem on llm fnrmer occas , and 

ninny ol I In in were Homeu bal iulrieiile. 
WlillK WITH ill UN \ Nil III Nil I. 
The next exercise was given by 11 enm- 
pllliy of tliirly-two girls, mill wns a drill in 
club swinging. They were led by Mrs. l.hing. 
rrrrveno Directed most 01 xne concert won 01 
the evening, and the musical aeoonipaulmeot 
in this and all following exercises, except 
the military drill and the n-sthetjc gym- 
nastics, was given by Miss Ella Vance, of 
AVcst Chester. . This drill was a very pretty 
one, and the young women in their hand- 
ling of the Indian clubs were more graceful 
than and quite as skillful as the hoys ; they 
all wore suits of navy blue tlanuel, made 
with blouse waists and divided skirts, black 
shoes and stockings and blue neckties, and 
they presented a very attractive appearance. 
I .ond applause wns given the perlormauce, 
and nt the close ol this drill the girls in the 
course of their march exchanged ilieir clubs 
for wooden rings, and gave a drill with the 
hitler, ill which there appeared a number ot 
beautiful figures, very huely given by the 
pi rformers. 

I'Af.AIIII II Aim AM' I'.iifK I'l.lMMNO. 
In I be i ihibilli.ii of heavy work which was 
given in xl Ibe greatest surprise nod enter 
lamnuiit were given many of the visiio-s 
find Ibe best comparison could be made with 
the bo\s' work. In this exercise sixteen girls 
look part, ihe lendirs being Misses Stella 
Harrison nod Anna Hughes. Dr. and Mrs. 
Khinger stood by to render assistance if any 
should be needed, but the girls proved them- 
selvis quite equal to all they attempted, and 
shewed no signs of fatigue. In this they all 
worel lemon colored tiesT~Thcir first "wors: 
wns upon the parallel bars, where they 
showed line development in a seriesof figures 
illustrating strength in various parts of the 
arm, the buck and chest, the feet and legs. 
These movements included "skinning the 
cat." hangiugupon the bars by lector hands, 
find a variety of somersaults, l'leascd up", 
plausc was given frequently, and the be- 
havior of the performers, as in all the work 
of the evening, was entirely modest and 
womanly. 

Hope (limbing wns next encaged in by the 
girjp, n lid here again in their movements 
Ihcy equaled the boys, and in the amount 
and rapidity of development probably sur- 
passed them, for few if any of these girls 
have been indulging in gymnastics all their 
lives. 

PART SECOND. 
This closed the first partot the programme 
and on intermission ot a few minutes was 
very pleiisnriily spent in listeningto a piano 
duet well rendered by Misses Maris and Van 
Etten. 

The first exercise in this part of Ihe pro. 
gramme wns one in ndvanced club swinging 
by Misses Charlotte liishop and Sara Ham- 
ilton, ihip wns very pretly, the movements 
being in concert, and very BimiUr to the 
work given at the former entertainment and 
on other aeensions by Otto Mouahan, which 
is so line. The young women were euoored, 
but did uot renppear. 

•] ii ic HODI' DRILL. 
This wns followed by a very attrg-tive 
hoop drill, given by thirty ol the ymiiig 
Indies of the Minor Class. As tiny marched 
in dressed in their blue suits, with red in- li- 
lies, and currying Ihe largo red hoops which 
Were pnrcliiisi d lor (his occasion with a put 
of the proceeds of the former entertainment, 
liny produced a very pretly effect; tho figures 
given by them were very fine, and showed 
careful attention and careful training, and 
mnny ol those who joined in the generous ap- 
plause thought tins one of the prettiest 
feutures of Ihe evening. 



1IIR MILITARY DRILL. 

A military drill by a company oftwntv- 
tour girls was the next namber and'wii 
given in n very fine manner. Several of the 
figures were. tuite new and all verv attrac- 
tive, and in their formation and m'moer of 
marching too much praise cannot h • given 
aid m. nr of the young men were heard 'to 
give the girls unlimited credi> aud geoerom 
praise. Among the figures beautifully 
shown in this exercise were the diamond tha 
«ois, various forms ol the wheel, the 'hoi 
low square. 

1 SIHP.TIC CVMNASTICS. 

Ibe iiKihei,,. gvmiiaHliri which worn next 
giving l,y ihe members of tl„. t.iwn nU« 
««-rri,.l„„„,| „„.| enjnved |,y all, and were 

pnrilcill.irly „,,,,r,.,i„|,..| |,y tl.ilse „|,„ | mv(J 

given mi, l!m„ K |,t i„ HeUarlo and l,,« „ le th- 
'■'is- I he young Indies who presented this at- 
tractive feature were dressed in Hu*iiiEdrap- 

fM.-s ol Mh.t,., in (Jreek style, and with or- 
iiamentBti..n ol the Grecian border in dark 
colors. '1 hey wore white bands ahiut their 
pondered hair, and in the grace and beauty 
'f Iheir uiovptoenl.i (hey closely resembled 
statuary. The first figures given by 
them w ire exercises for 



grace, following which they soaipwhat 
ennng, ,j ,|, p , r pos j tmns nnd RaTe jn a fia(j 

manner posture groupings, representative of 
languor, mischief, listening, surprise ex> 
pectancy, tear, grief, supplication, triumph. 
all of which were easily recognize 1 by tha 
audience. The young ladies were recallei : 
and repealed Ihe posture grouping. 

I lie line enlerliiinment eloseif with tha 
grand march by eighly girls, including all 
from fbr wliool who had lakeu part in tho 
evening s exercises. They were led by Dr 
I'.liingi-r mid m all their movements, nnm" of 
which wen- quite inlric lie, the greatest skill 
»"<■ prccisi,,,, was shown. 'Jim moveoicuti 
also included a rim, from which no girbj 
dropped out. and none showed fatigue. 

As has been previously staled, the march 
rendered during the Seniors' hoop drill i» 
the composition of Mr. Joseph M. Ilartman 
a student in the school, and was played br 
him. * 

r.ir.t.s in the exhibition; 
The girls who took part in the various 
parts of the programme were us follows: 

II. I ftfi AN I' Kl V(.S. 

Mary llowc-u, Ella lirooks, 

Frances Made. Abble Jackson, 

Hertha KorsyfUc, Anna Morgan, 

Adelald Johnson, Laura Keighley, 

101 la Darlington, Anna fetters, 

Adele Hniley, Clara Uh-kiug, 

Jessie Gunkle, Minnie Downle, 

Marion Itakestraw, Nora Meshter. 

Flora Heebner, Mary l'vle, 

Katie Carroll, Bessie Godfrey, 

Ethel John, Mary Sharpless, 

Jennie l'ratt, Esther Wynne, 

Florence Broslus, Bessie Mast, 

Mabel Woodward, Margaret Jones, 

JS'ellle Turner, Annie Uavls, 

Sarah Passmore, Mary Osborne, 

Florence Muekiu, Laura Eisenbrey, 

Sara Hamilton, Hannah Meudeuhall, 

Florence Cbalfant, Eurle nicking, 
Ida Palmer. 
MILITARY DRILL. 

Roberta Clark, Ella Scully, 

Lucy Smedley, Adelaid Johnson, 

Mary Sharpies?, Lizzie KlrK, 
Hannab Mendenhull, Florence l'etwller, 

Km ma EUwan^er, Marion Kakestravr, 

Katie Carroll, Anna Uavls, 

F.lla Brooks, Llz/le Leigh, 

Leila Beltler, Mabel Felty, 

Adele liailey, Mary Leahy, 

Anna Lilly, Anna Hughes, 

idaPalmer, Esther VV'vuue, 

Mary Woodward, Adelaide Moduli. 

HOOF 11KI1.L. 

Leila Beltler, Coruellu McMullen, 

Florence Detwller, F:dltb MelMnald, 

Martha Fiithey, Ella Scully, 

Alice Irwin, Befsle Trapp, 

Emma Knight, Virginia W orstall, 

Annie Lilly, Roberta Clark, 

Ella Martin, f Jzzle Frederick, 

F.lla Rntb, Bessie Hughes, 

Hannah Smith, Eleclra .laeksoa, 

Florence Wlndle, Anna Levmel, 

Annie Bertelot, Sara Martin, 

Lizzie Foulk, Kathryn Murphy, 

Bessie Grater, Lucy Smedley, 

Anna Jackson, Charlotte Wetterau, 

Lizzie Lelgb, Lauretta Verkes. 

AWTItKTIC eiYMS'ASTICS. 

Lizzie Wollerton, Sarah DeHaven, 

Mary Oornwell, Idly Hemphill, 

Ada Corhwell, Marie Jackson. 
Chartetw Bishop, 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 29 



11 FEBRUARY 1893 



Gymnasium and Athletic Notes. 

The proceeds of the girls' entertainment 
amounted to almost two hundred dollars. 
The expenses were about eighty dollars, in- 
cluding the purchase of the additional sup- 
ports for the raised platfor-n. 

After the boys' entertainment on Decem- 
ber loth, several were heard to remark, as 
did oue of the teachers. " Well what is there 
left for the girls to do? " They found Fri- 
dav evening that there was plenty left 
which the boys had neither attempted nor 
thought of. 

Don't let anyone say that girls can't 
swing clubs. The work done by the thirty - 
two young ladies was a revelation to many. 
Scarcely a single error was made in the 
whole long series of movements. The time 
was perfect, each set of movements coming 
out exactly with the musical measure. 

It is not often that you will see such 
difficult movements as the double " suakes " 
and complicated "follows" executed, as 



was done by the Misses Charlotte Bishop 
and Sarah Hamilton, in their club swinging 
exercises. Brace up boys ! or you will get 

left in club work. 

i 

And as for marching ! All the old vet- 
erans and youny military men present united 
ill pronouncing the marching by the twenty- 
four young ladies as 6ne as they had ever 
seen. The diamond, star, wheel, and wheel 
within wheel, and hollow square, were ex- 
ecuted without a pause or a break, and with 
a snap and precisiou that was beautiful to 
see. Many pronounced this the finest thiug 
on the program, although opinions were 
divided. 

The sixteen girls who took part in the 
work on the parallel bars, and at rope 
climbing, mrde a decided hit. Few who 
have not been watching our girls at heavy 
work had any idea that they could perform 
such difficult movements. Many of the 
feats required a great deal of courage as 
well as strength and skill, but not one failed. 
The pyramids on the bars were much ad- 
mired, and several instructors from other 



places who were present said they never had 
seen such things attempted by girls before. 
The exercises with wooden rings were ex- 
ceedingly graceful. The work in pairs and 
pretty attitudes, was vigorously applauded. 

The hoop drill by the senior girls was 
'lew even to rnost of the students, as the 
hoops were enly recently purchased, and all 
practice with them had been in private. As 
the senior girls marched into the room they 
presented a splendid appearance in their 
neat blue divided suits, red neck-ties and 
new red hoops over their shoulders ; and 
the audience gave them a warm reception. 
The pretty steps, the graceful circles, and 
postures elicited frequent applause. 

The march which Mr. J. M. Hartman 
played for the Seniors, is his own compo- 
sition. It has been dedicated to the gym- 
nasium, and christened "The Gymnasium 
Grand March. " It is certainly a fine pro- 
duction and a most inspiriting one tomjrch 
to. 



OCR NORMAL SCHOOL OIBL8. 

The gymnastic exhibition given last 
week by the yonDg women at the Nor- 
mal School has caused some comment 
here and there from persons to whom 
it was a novelty and who do not seem 
to think that such exercises are a 
necessary or becoming part of femi- 
nine education. 

We have also heard some remarks 
derogatory to the costumes which were 
worn on the occasion and which have 
been objected to on the ground that 
they were not strictly "proper," al- 
though they are in vogue and have 
been for some time past in similiar in- 
stitutions which the cultivation of 
feminine physical strength is regularly 
pursued. 

The fact is that there is nothing im- 
proper or immodest either in the ex- 
ercises or the costumes. The former 
:s a useful, wholesome and health-giv- 
ing method of developing muscle and 
acquiriog grace ; the latter is judicious 
and sensible and can impress no one 
except a bad-minded person with aDy 
thought ot indecorum. 

In our judgment nothing is more im- 
portant in the education of our girls 
and in fitting them for the duties of 
womanhood than the attention which 
is now given to the training of their 
bodies as well as their minds. Dr. 
Philips has done nothing better than to 



give his female pupils opportunity to 
strengthen and develop their muscula r 
systems aDd the only criticisms which 
may be passed upon it is that it shall 
not be carried to an undue extent or 
permitted to become a fad that will in- 
terfere with their mental studies. This 
is not at all likely under the excellent 
discipline which prevails at the Nor- 
mal School and among a body of 
young women who are characterized in 
more than ordinary degree by dili- 
gence, good sense and useful ambition. 
We can never have beautiful or at- 
tractive or useful women if they are 
not possessed of health which is the 
foundation of female beauty and the 
inspiration to endeavor. There was a 
time when the sex seemed to deem it 
proper that they should be delicate 
and fragile, but that foolish and un- 
natural affection is passing away. We 
do not wish of course to make athletes 
or amazons of our women ; but the 
stimulus to physical activity on their 
their part is sure to make them more 
robust, more graceful and therefore 
more charmiDg and to give us a better 
race in the next generation. Every 
right thinking man and woman will 
look upon the physical training and ex- 
hibitions in the Normal School not 
only with favor but with a hope that 
they may be extended so as to be in. 
troduced generally among youog 
women. 



12 FEBRUARY 1893 



SCHOOLGIRL ATHLETES. 



Short Skirts Shocked Some of the 
Stnld People. 

West Chester, Ta., Feb. 12— The talk 
of the town for two days has been the 
pymnastic exhibition Riven Friday night 
by the Normal School girls. About 
one hundred of the best-formed maidens 
participated in the exercises and easily 
outrivaled their fellow male students in 
such feats as "skinning the ca^," turning 
summersaults, Indian club swinging, 
hanging to rings or bars, head down- 
ward, and nearly all other forms of ex- 
ercise where e:>se and grace form an im- 
portant part. The girls were clad in 
bifurcated skirts, ending at the knees, 
loose waists, low shoes, and black stock- 
ings. Their appearance as they marched 
into the gymnastic arena was loudly 
applauded by the great crowd that was 
present. 

The costume feature is the one that 
has caused the most comment in this 
sober comi: unity. Many < of the staid 
and elderly people have suggested what 
they deem "the brnzen impropriety" of 
the girls appearing in public in such dress 
nnd going through the various perform- 
ances. But the vast majority of spec- 
tators and townspeople were too tickled 
to say a derogatory word and have only 
applause for the girls and the school. 



30 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



MINSTRELS 

. — -for ^e ten?f\x &? — 

First Normal Base Ball Club 

WEST CHEST \M STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 
SATURDAY EVEG. MARCH 11,^93 



PROGRAM. 
PART 1, 

9o*es - Ot-ttsF, MonaKam Tatnbourinz.— 0. 6 Lonjd&pr- 

MARQ« 

Oriamdl Sono— "Wken ¥ou Co«c*> TKWt.of |t^ , 

Solo "KiK£\Maten,CuJld5('«©Kas"TheyFlo»<.'' 1 G.b'SoT 
i'l-antaTioaS^g -""Mosts Cd»*TPe«i Melon Vow* 

On-iin^ Cvwul Song— ^O'Hf Nev^eutaton Hall ,A 

• LanaaKcr- 

?»lo — ff Wsty Ove^ Yo n<ief 1 ' Oyve*- 

W»slinyto>\ P«T . Sw^Mflit Bdfijtf C) M b 



The Minstrel Entertainment. 

"AMULET" 1893 PP. 38-39 

On Saturday evening, March 17, the 
Normalites were treated to a good laugh, 
and a good time due to the success of the 
minstrel entertainment given. 

The exercises rendered were similiar to 
those given a year before, consisting of jokes, 
music, burlesques and funny business. 
Promptly at 7.45, Miss Jennie Maris, assis- 
tant teacher of music of the school, struck 
up a march on the piano, when the mem- 
bers of the troupe marched forth and took 
their respective seats on the stage ; there 
were thirteen members, all wearing full dress 
suits arid neat black ties, except the end 
men; who wore gorgeous collars and red 
neckties. After a few jokes were cracked 
by the end men, Otto F. Monohan sang an 
original song, " When you Come to Think 
of It." The music of this song was written 
by Joseph Hartman, a student of the school. 
A very pretty solo, " If the Waters Could 
Speak as they Flow," was sung by Chas. 
K. Gibson ; this solo and chorus was pro- 
nounced by many the best of the evening. 
After a few more jokes were indulged in, 
Menno S. Moyer sang a plantation song, 
" Moses, Cart dem Melon down." An 
original comic song, " Our New Recitation 
Hall," was sung by D. B. Longaker, and 
created a great deal of laughter ; in response 
to an encore, he sang a descriptive song of 
making " sourkroul." H. M. Clymer sang 



pUndoUm S©k •, . Benjamin F, BitpA 

TWO OLD CRONIES, 



(By Request.) 
jst£, 
&&-»&*&.&& Crony) 



i£3btt*ais> Allriuhr'(i.sri>cmny 



Morwhan 
[.cngsk.e*' 



"COME MERE THE LILIES BLOOM. 



Minstrel Octette 



*OUR CV7V\:iNKSIU7VY.^ 

Tra filing for Srtflfiig Sport!* 

'LV CuFjx' lence (i'msTruci&r). , . , Longakei 

b, J»e*<"» ^11-aruuwd gymnast).. - - . . Monah.iii 

Other mem tors of C'y« 1 na>in*fni CLub by . . Company 

SELECTION. "Menry Tnwek-n, QwicWsrep. " S.&C. 

A TRIP TO ChTcKENTOWN. 

RrwerPlouohsh^rcjKrnidy } ■„_ „ \ Rasfws. Monahair 
Chdst . . ! . . GiteoU ^'^iJul^ l-°"#^ 

very effectively, " Way Over Yonder." Af- 
ter the singing of the solos, the minstrels re- 
tired from the stage in favor of the Swarth- 
more Banjo Club, which had been engaged 
to furnish music for the occasion. " Merry 
Travelers Quickstep" was rendered by them 
in a very good manner. Despite the fact 
that this was the first appearance they have 
made as a club, they are on a fair road to 
gain renown. The music was greatly appre- 
ciated and a response to an encore was neces- 
sary. 

One of the strongest features of the pro- 
gram was an exhibition of club swinging 
by Dr. C. E. Ehinger and Otto F. Monohan, 
assisted on the piano by Mrs. C. E. Ehin- 
ger. This, however, was Dr. Ehinger's 
first appearance on a West Chester stage, 
to swing clubs; while Mr. Monohan has 
gained a good reputation in this capacity. 
Besides going through various delicate 
movements, they gave an exhibition of 
charging which added greatly to the effect. 

Part 11. of the program was opened by 
Mr. Benjamin F. Battin, who played a 
mandolin solo. A comedy sketch, " Two 
Old Cronies," excited great laughter and 
comment. This sketch was given by re- 
quest, as the one previously given 'was so 
well received. Otto Monohan as Rabascus 
Allright, and D. B. Longaker, as Feke 
Notright, were the characters. Mr. Mono- 
han was dressed in a very flashy suit, having 
on an Aryan blue coat and vest, and white 
pantaloons, while Mr. Longaker was dressed 
more to represent a tramp. A great deal of 
" funny business ". was given by them, and 
they left the stage amid immense applause. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 31 



playing, as they did the year previous, 
their band duet. 

The minstrel octette, Messrs. Clymer, 
M. S. Moyer, Heaton, Gibson, Bye, Hart- 
man, Tholan and Brady, sang " Come 
Where the Lilies Bloom ;" this selection 
was sung last spring by the Aryan chorus, 
and made a decided hit. 

A burlesque, " Our Gymnasium — Train- 
ing for Spring Sports," was next on the 
program. Longaker as Dr. Corpulence, 
(instructor,) and Monohan, as S. I news, (an 
all around gymnast,) were the principal 
characters. Longaker was fitted out hand- 
somely with a 55-inch waist. An exhibition 
of boxing was given by Dr. Corpulence, 
and S. Inews, which resulted in a disastrous 
defeat for the Dr. S. Inews exhibited his 
strength by hurling a 999-pound weight 
through the air. A visitor was brought in- 
to the gymnasium ; while being shown 
around, one of the boys who was training, 
struck the visitor on the head with an 
Indian club, which resulted in his death. 
A mock funeral procession was played on 
the audience, and was the cause of great 
disappointment on their part. 

The Swarthmore Banjo Club next ap- 
peared on the stage and played " Washing- 
ton Post ;" another encore was responded 
to by them. Another burlesque, " A Trip 
to Chickentown," was given. A chicken 
coop was placed on the stage, which was 
to be robbed by the thieves. The charac- 
ters were Farmer Ploughshare, Brady; 
Ghost, Gibson ; and the thieves, Longaker 
and Monohan. The scene opened with 
Farmer Ploughshare carefully inspecting 
his hen house before retiring. Monohan next 
appeared on the stage, and found by in- 
spection a big lock on the chicken coop 
door, which prompted him to sing " There's 
a Lock on the Chicken Coop Door;" after 
a more careful investigation, he found an 
entrance through the hole in which the 
chickens are supposed to pass — being about 
10 by 12 inches. After gaining his entrance, 
the hens began cackling. Longaker, the 
second thief, appeared on the scene, and 
after investigation found Monohan's feet 
sticking out through the hole. Catching 
hold of Monohan's feet he imitated a dog, 
and pulled Monohan out, very much 
frightened. After a few excuses for both 
appearing at the same coop at the same 
time, they both decided to rob it together, 
when their plans were frustrated by the ap- 



pearance of the ghost. The burlesque 
ended with a song relating to the chicken 
coop. 

Although the weather on this evening 
was not the best, a fair sized audience was 
present, and a neat sum realized for the 
ball team. The members of the club are 
under great obligations to Miss Maris, and 
Mr. Hankinson, upon whose directions 
the success of the musical features depended. 

Credit is also due to ex-manager Brady, 
on account of his untiring efforts to have a 
successful entertainment. Brady left his 
farm and spent two weeks at the Normal, 
planning and arranging for the entertain- 
ment. 

Those who took part in half circle, are as 
follows: Fred Brady, Middletown, Del., 
( Interlocutor); Otto F. Monohan, Quincy' 
111., ( Bones ) ; D. Brower Longaker^ Lans- 
dale, Pa., (Tambourine); Norman L Hea- 
ton, Terwood, Bucks Co., Pa.; Samuel 
Tholan, Merlin, Chester Co., Pa. ; Morton 
Gregory, Cottage, Huntington Co., Pa.; 
Menno S. Moyer, Chalfont, Bucks Co., Pa. ; 
Harvey M. Clymer, Line Lexington, Bucks 
Co., Pa. ; Chas. K. Gibson.Odessa.Delaware; 
Frank P. Bye, Frederica, Delaware ; Joseph 
Hartman, West Pikeland, Chester Co., Pa. ; 
Eugene Buckman, Penn Valley, Bucks Co., 
Pa. ; U. S. Koons, West Chester, Pa. 




1893 BASEBALL TEAM 
Front Row: Fluck, Monohan (Captain), Longaker, Ford, Hartman. 
Back Row Buckman, Farrell, Koons, Farrell, Heron. 



32 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



8 FEBRUARY 1894 



9 FEBRUARY 1894 



Twenty- four manly young fellows were 
marching on the floor ot the gymnasium at 
the State Normal School yesterday afternoon. 
With heads erect and eyes straight to the 
front they walked as one man, keeping per- 
fect step, and wheeling, countermarching 
and forming figures under the direction of 
Dr. Ehinger, their teacher. All looked 
healthy and bright, and it was no trouble to 
see that they were interested in their work. 
The largest, in the line was Lindsay 
Sproat, son of Harris E.Sproat, of Thornbury, 
and the smallest, though by no means the 
least interested, was William, son of Dr. Etf- 
ing, of West Grove. Two of the boys are 
sons of bank presidents, three are the sons of 
physicians, and numerous others have been 
accustomed to breathing the wholesome_,air 
of Chester county farms. 

These are a few of the students who will 
take part in the entertainment to-morrow 
night. They will wear dark pantaloons with 
white stripes on the sides, and light onting 
shirt*. Indian club swinging is their strong- 
hold. 

Another class.larger size.with little Clinton 
Mitchell at one end and big C. V. R. Evans 
at the other, appears in another line ot work, 
somewhat similar, yet very different in its 
effect. This class handles the bar balls, or 
wands about five feet in length with balls on 
the ends, and with them many ot the most 
graceful figures are formed. 

In addition to these classes the heavy gym- 
nastics will be a pleasing feature. Several of 
the young men are fine performers on the 
parallel bars, the horse and the buck. 
Tumbling on the mats, in which some of the 
boys are acquiring special skill, is not the 
least interesting portion of their work. In 
the jumping contests much competition is 
expected. MuBic will be heard all the even- 
ing. , . 

To-day the carpenters are erecting rai9ed 
Beats in the southern part of the room, and 
these.which will be reserved for the audience, 
are being sold rapidly. Students will be as- 
signed places in the gallery. 



Part /. 

Light Gymnastics. 

music. 

i. Marching, 

2. Club Swinging, 

V Free Gymnastics, Advanced Model Pupils 

4. Grand March. . Advanced Mi. del Pupils 

5. liar Belt Exercises, Class of X2 Young Men 

6. Fancy CI. lb Swinging, Mr. Lindsey Sproat 

Part 2. 

H. avy Gymnastics. 

KCSIC. 

1. Class in High Jumping, 

[llustrati 

2. Contest in High Jumping. 

3. Class Exercises on Parallel Bars. 

4. Class Exercises on Vaulting Buck. 

5. Contest, iii High Kicking. 

6. Class Exercises on Vaulting Horse 

7. Mat Exercises— Acrobatic Potpourri 
S. Pyramids. 

" Run ! Jump ! ! Swim ! ! ! 
West Chester Gym." 
Good Night. 



The Boys' Gymnastic Exhibition. 

The second annual exhibition given by 
the young men of the Normal School, as- 
sisted by the advanced model pupils, took 
place Friday evening, February 9th, and 
proved a grand success in all particulars. 

The capacity of the great gymnasium was 
severely taxed to accommodate the hun- 
dreds who attended. The assemblage was a 
representative one, including scotes of West 
Chester s best people, while the surround- 
ing towns and country contributed gener- 
ously to the crowd, notwithstanding the rain 
and mud they had to encounter. 

These annual exhibitions bid fair to be- 
come prominent features of the year's enter- 
tainments, and attract large numbers of old 
students and Normal graduates, all of whom 
cherish the friendliest feelings for the beauti- 
ful gymnasium and its directors. 

Nothing speaks more decidedly for the 
cause of physical education in general, and 
for this department in our Normal School 
in particular, than the number and charac- 
ter of the people who are attracted to these 
entertainments. The audiences on these 
occasions would fitly grace any great lit- 
erary, musical or dramatic event, and nothing 
testifies more eloquently to the painstaking 
efforts made to maintain a high degree of ex- 
cellence. 

Doubtless the success of the department 

and the popularity of these entertainments 

among the 1>etter class in our community is 

Class of 24 Young Men largely due to the fact that the work pre- 

Class of 24 Y.ning Men . t 1 is illustrative of all the different 

£ 1 »f '1 1 ■ . . I 1 M (IjIijI T ' I ' 

phases of physical education ; that it does 
not give undue prominence to either the 
strictly mechanical drills, the artistic, the 
recreative nor the emulative features, but 
gives to each its just appreciation and pro- 
pe- place. 

The spirit of competition so rife in many 
of our schools and colleges is not allowed 
to predominate, though always given proper 
recognition by limiting the number of such 
events and keeping them well under control. 
Artistic effects are introduced, but not to the 
exclusion of the plainer and more effective 
developing exercises. 

Systematic exercises for symmetrical de- 
velopment are always made prominent fea- 
tures both of the regular work and of the 
exhibitions. 



HONORS CAPTURED BY THE CHESTER 
COUNTY BOYS. 



DirTcrciu Styles 




DR. EfllNGEB. 



Jacob BnshoilR, of VVtlt Grove, Break! 

Two Good Record*— A Fine Kil.ll.l- 

11". 1 l.uwl Nlglit. 

In their athletic exhibition last night the 
Normal boys covered 
themselves with glory. 
They broke records.sur- 
prised their friends,and 
pleased a large audi- 
dence, besides making 
a neat sum for the pur- 
chase of new apparatus 
Step by step the depart- 
ment of physical cul- 

4 *$£$$$£? I T** lure is coming to the 

7 tSssS'"*'^ A \ front, and many pa- 

»ir J / \^i«»L trons now regard It as 

among the most lm- 

fiortant and most prof- 
table branches taught. 
The primary object of 
Dr. C. E. Ehinger, the physical director, was 
not torurnisha seriesofexcltingcontesls,but 
rather to show the people what Is done In 
regular class work at the school every day. 
lu this he succeeded wonderfully well. 

SWUNG INDIAN CLUBS. 

First on the prngramme came a class of 
twenty-four young men, who marched back- 
ward and forward, wheeled, turned, counter- 
marched, nnd made many figures, then pro- 
duced their Indian clubs and swung them in 
perfect time, going through many intricate 
motions, while Mrs. Khlnger played a march 
on tne piano. They wore dark pantaloons, 
with white and blue stripes, gaily colored 
belts, light outing shirts and red neckties, a 
uniform which looked especially well. The 
participants were as follows: 

Galen Wright, William LeCompte, Leon- 
ard Ruth, Eugene Buckman, Howard Moses. 
KobertEvans.Isaac Hoopea,Wllllarn Ewing, 
Willie Hemphill, Jacob Bushong, Walter 
Oreenwood, Percy Connor, Francis Hall- 
niun, Clifford Garrett, William Kinder, 
Charles Lerch, John Nellz. Heber Sensenlg, 
Leon Lapp, Frank Brower, Henry Darling- 
ton, Charles Maderla, Clarence Mendenhall, 
Lindsay Sproat, lrwln Plum. 

MODEI.ITES APPEAR. 

As the boys marched away a class of forty- 
two boys and girls from the model school ap- 
peared, being led by Dorcas, daughter of 
William P. Mercer, and Carrie, daughter of 
Curtis H. Hannum. They posed in many 
wuyr, made graceful gestures, tripped lightly 
to the music and then all Joined lu thegraud 
lui.rch, which they executed perfectly. 

Barbell exercises, by thirty-two young 
men of various sizes, were the most graceful 
features of the entertainment, with one ex- 
ception. With these novel forms of appara- 
tus the boys went through an admirable 
drill and formed a number of Intricate 
figures. To hold the rods by the tips of the 
fingers as the pupils assumed the different 
latitudes was no easy task, and once, when 
a rod wus dropped, the accident was consid- 
ertd .perfectly excusable. The class which 
performed this work consisted ot the follow- 

"lliirbells: Phil Magulre, Clarence Moyer, 
John Paschall, Andrew Bechtel, Lewis 
Brown, Albert Moses, Raymond Rogers, 
Aaron England, Clinton Mitchell, Harry 
Kotz. James Field, lrwln Plum, M. R. Jack- 
son, Phil Darlington, Qulncy Thomas, Spald- 
ing Long, George Luft, Charles Maderla, 
Clarence Mendeuhall, James iPyle, Hiram 
Keelar, Charles Brown, Horace H. Beldler, 
Leon Lapp, Francis Hallman, William 
Kinzer, Giien Wright, Frank lirower, Percy 
Connor, Cllftord Garrett, Leonard Ruth, 
Isuac Hoopes, Henry Darlington, Charles 
Lerch. 






DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 33 



"AMULET" FEBRUARY 1894 



The Boys' Gymnastic 

The second annual exhibition given by 
the young men of the Normal School, as- 
sisted by the advanced model pupils, took 
place Friday evening, February gth, and 
proved a grand success in all particulars. 

The capacity of the great gymnasium was 
severely taxed to accommodate the hun- 
dreds who attended. The assemblage was a 
representative one, including scores of West 
Chester's best people, while the surround- 
ing towns and county contributed gener- 
ously to the crowd, notwithstanding the rain 
and mud they had to encounter. 

These annual exhibitions bid fair to be- 
come prominent features of the year's enter- 
tainments, and attract large uuhibersof old 
students and Normal graduates, all of whom 
cherish the friendliest feelings for the beauti- 
ful gj'tnnasium and its directors. 

Nothing speaks more decidedly for the 
cause of physical education in general, and 
for this department in our Normal School 
in particular, than the number and charac- 
ter of the people who are attracted to these 
entertainments. The audiences on these 
occasions would fitly grace any great lit- 
erary, musical or dramatic event, and nothing 
testifies more eloquently to the painstaking 
efforts made to maintain a high degree of ex- 
cellence. 

The program of the evening was opened 
with exercises in marching by a class of 
twenty-four young men. The appearance 
of their excellent work was greatly augmen- 
ted by the pretty uniform of dark trousers 
with broad white stripes, light outing shirts, 
red neckties and neat silk belts of dark blue 
and red. It is seldom that one sees better 
marching in a regularly trained military 
company than was done by these young men . 
The wheeling in fours, oblique marching, 
and forming " on right into line" were es- 
pecially well done and elicited generous ap- 
plause. 

At the close of the marching evolutions 
the young men took Indian clubs and 
formed for class exercises. A series of ex- 
ercises used for ordinary class work was first 
gone through with, then followed some 
more difficult movements not included in 
the ordinary drills, and lastly came very 
graceful movements with the clubs accom- 
panied by charging movements and beauti- 
ful attitudes. 



Exhibition. 

As the Model pupils took their seats a file 
of thirty-two young men made its appear- 
ance. The first part of their work, as in the 
class with Indian clubs, consisted of a series 
as given in the regular class work, which 
was in turn succeeded by exercises of a 
more advanced character, and concluded 
with groupings in beautiful attitudes each 
of which was held through one measure of 
the music, and then quickly changed. 

The beauty and difficulty of these exer- 
cises, was at once appreciated by the audi- 
ence which applauded enthusiastically. The 

light work was concluded with fancy club 
swinging by Lindsey Sproat. This was Mr. 
Sproat's first public appearance before a 
West Chester audience, and few were pre- 
pared for such a treat as he gave. The 
beauty and complexity of some of his 
movements fairly bewildered those who 
were not accustomed to fancy club swing- 
ing. The difficult and complicated snake 
and follow movements were executed with 
such ease and rapidity that the eye could 
scarcely follow them, and great wonder was 
expressed that such movements could be 
executed without striking the head of the 
performer or touching the clubs together. 

The audience insisted on Mr. Sproat's re- 
appearance, and in responding to the encore 
he treated them to some fine evolutions not 
given before. The remarkable proficiency 
of Mr. Sproat with the clubs is the result of 
only two year's practice in the Normal 
gymnasium, as previous to this time he had 
never attempted fancy work. 
The second part of the program was opened 
with class exercises in jumping. Various 
styles were illustrated, jumping from right 
foot, left foot, both feet, backwards and 
forwards, hitch-and-kick, jump from right 
and left side, the graceful hurdle jump, etc. 
The diving which followed called forth 
many exclamations of wonder and amuse- 
ment. To go head foremost over a bar 
some five feet in height, and come up lightly 
on the feet without doing personal injury 
seemed quite remarkable to the uninitiated. 
The high jumping proved one of thetnost 
exciting events of the evening, and was 
closely contested. The contestants were 



34 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



Howard Moses, Heber Sensenig, Eugene 
Buckman and Jacob Bushong. The bar was 
started at a height of four feet and gradu- 
ally raised to about five feet before any one 
failed. Messrs. Sensenig, Buekman and 
Bushong all cleared over five feet one inch. 
Mr. Bushong won the contest by success- 
fully clearing a height of five feet, two and 
three-quarter inches, and in doing so broke 

Mr. Buckman' s previous record of five feet 
one and one-half inches. 

The work on the parallel bars was very 
fine, being the most difficult heavy work of 
the evening. Great proficiency was dis- 
played upon this piece of apparatus. The 
exercises on it were concluded with two 
splendid pyramids in which over a dozen 
young men took part. 

The large class which took part in the ex- 
ercises on the vaulting buck acquitted itself 
finely, and succeeded in mastering this un- 
ruly aninj^l in a most creditable manner. 

The standing high kick was won in a 
handy manner by Aquilla Chandler, who 
succeeded in touching the tambourine at a 
height of seven feet five inches. 

In the running high kick Jacob Bushong 
again proved a winner by kicking eight feet 
five inches. Harry Lucas proved a close 
second. 

The exercises on the vaulting horse were 
well done and proved interesting to the au- 
dience, while the acrobatic work and pyra- 
mids gave as much genuine enjoyment and 
surprise as anything on the program. The 
strength, skill and courage exhibited in 
building these human pyramids %vas a revel- 
ation to many. Masters Willie Ewing and 
Charles Foster acted as top men. 

Much amusement was created by the 
diminutive clown who appeared during the 
closing part of the heavy work. The 
make-up of Master Charles Foster would 
have done credit to a veritable circus. His 
antics were highly appreciated by the child- 
ren. 



Mrs. Ehinger acted as accompanist for the 
light gymnastics, and Mr. Wm. Lovett pre- 
sided at the piano during the heavy work. 

The program in full was as follows : 

Part i. 

Light Gymnastics. 

music 

Class of 24 Young Men. 

Class of 24 Young Men. 

Advanced Model Pupils. 

Advanced Model Pupils. 

Class of 32 Young Men. 

Mr." Lindsey Sproat. 



1. Marching, 

2. Club Swinging, 

3. Free Gymnastics, 

4. Grand March, 

5. Bar Bell Exercises, 

6. Fancy Club Swinging 



Part 2. 

Heavy Gymnastics. 

music 

1. Class in High Jumping, 

Illustrating Different Styles. 

2. Contest in High Jumping. 

3. Class Exercises on Parallel Bars. 

4. Class Exercises on Vaulting Buck. 

5. Contest in High Kicking. 

6. Class Exercises on Vaulting Horse. 

7. Mat Exercises — Acrobatic Potpourri. 
S. Pyramids. 

" Run ! Jump ! ! Swim ! ! ! 
West Chester Gym." 
Good Night. 
class in .marching and club swinging. 
Galen Wright, William LeCompte, Leonard 
Ruth, Eugene Buckman, Howard Moses, Robert 
Evans, Isaac Hoopes, William Ewing, Willie Hemp- 
hill, Jacob Bushong, Walter Greenwood, Percy 
Connor, Francis Hallman, Clifford Garrett, Wil- 
liam Kinzer, Charles Lerch, John Neitz, Heber 
Sensenig, Leon Lapp, Frank Brower, Henry Dar- 
lington, Charles Maderia, Clarence Mendenhall, 
Lindsey Sproat and Irwin Plum. 

CLASS IN BAR BELL EXERCISES. 

Phil Maguire, Clarence Moyer, John Paschall, 
Andrew Bechtel, Lewis Brown, Albert Moses, 
Aaron England, Clinton Mitchell, Harry Kotz, 
James Field, Irwin Plum, M. R. Jackson, Phil Dar- 
lington, Quincy Thomas, Spaulding Long, George 
Luft, Clarence Mendenhall, James Pyle, Hiram 
Kellar, Charles Brown, H. Horace Beidler, Leon 
Lapp, Francis Hallman-, William Kinzer, Galen 
Wright, Frank Brower, Percy Connor, Clifford 
Garrett, Leonard Ruth, Isaac Hoopes, Henry 
Darlington and Charles Lerch. 

PYRAMIDS. 

Dr. Ehinger, Otto Monahan, Eugene Buckman, 
J. M. Hartman, Jacob Bushong, Howard Moses, 
Robert Evans, Wm. Hemphill, Leon Lapp, Willie 
Ewing, Heber Sensenig, Charles Foster. 







Aryan Orchestra 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 35 



5 MARCH 1894 



FAIR NORMAL GYMNASTS. 



THE 



GYMNASIUM CROWDED 
SATURDAY EVENING. 



The Girls Acquit Themselves Well and wer 

Liberally Applaunded by the large 

and Delighted Audience. 



Jirthelr gymnastic entertainment at the 
-tformal Gymnasium last Saturday evening, 
the girls were patronized even more liberally 
than the boys were on the evening ot their 
exhibition. February 9th, as the room could 
not accommodate the people desiring to 
see. Hundreds were obliged to stand the 
entire evening. The program was some- 
what delayed In the start by the crowds ut 
the door, and it was well on toward eight 
o'clock before the march of the first relay 
came upon the floor. Dumb Bell and Free 
Gymnastics were displayed by a large class 
of the advanced pupils of the Model School. 
Club swinging by a class of thirty young 
ladies, and we listened in vain for a strik- 
ing of the clubs, for they were doing their 
best. Free gymnastics and marching, il- 
lustrating a daily lesson, was next in order, 
and then came a dumb-bell quadrille, an 
entirely novel feature, and of Mrs.Ehlnger's 
planning, as her wise head needs no sugges- 
tions in this work. This was performed by 
six young ladles of the senior class, wear- 
ing the regulation "gym" suits of dark 
blue, black stockings and low shoes, their 
neckties of white and yellow, the class 
color, and on their heads a dark blue "Tarn" 
with a daisy stuck therein, the class 
flower. They made a natty appearance, 
and were loudly applauded by all and sa- 
luted by their senior brothers in the eastern 
gallery with the class yell. A quickstep, a 
minuet, played by Miss Cornell, was kept 
up, and after a march they arranged them- 
selves into four sets or quadrllls, and the 
various figures were gone through, their 
steps and tapping of dumb bells keeping 
attractive time. Frequently they were ap- 
plauded as the figures grew more Intri- 
cate, and as they formed to trip out, some 
one yelled, "Pull that string," when Mr. 
Burlew, a senior, did so, and down from the 
centre girder floated two long strips of 
bunting. In yellow and white, which was 
again greeted by the boys with their yells, 
and responded to with the same by the 
girls. Loud applause did not bring a recall. 
A selected class of a dozen young ladies 
then did some heavy work on the parallel 
bars and rings, and showed themselves as 
supple as the hoys. The high jumping, 
using the rings as a motive power, was ex- 
ceptionally fine. After a piano duet by 
Misses Connell and Morgan, another novel 
feature was introduced, called a "Gymnas- 
tic pie," and this time thirty-two young la- 
dles, aftr marching, formed Into various 
figures, and kept time to inspiring music 
on the piano and banjo, the latter by the 
inimitable Harry Johnson. A Southern 
tune similar to that played for a clog 
dance, was rendered, and time kept with 
fingers and feet by the class. The snapping 
of the fingers simulated Castanet and the 
feet a dancing step. It took immensely. 
Miss Grace Hellyer. a senior, gave a display 
of club swinging, which exceeded anything 
the girls have heretofore accomplished, and 
compares favorably with that of Lidsay 
Sproat in the previous exhibition. While 
this was In progress Butler, a junior, 
monted the girder by the gallery, and 
edging along reached the senior colors, tied 
them about his waist, reached far over and 
hung a red ribbon from a cros wire, and re- 
turned the same way. It looked a peril- 
ous feat. The applause was restrained until 
Miss Hellyer had finished her part. Then, 
thirty-six young ladles of the Junior class 
filed In, with red neckties and red carna- 
tions In the hair, and the Junior boys In the 



west gallery made the rafters ring with 
their yell for the XLV class. This was an 
exercise with long poles. Each six girls 
had a pole on either side. The various at- 
titudes made a striking effect, and they 
were lustily applauded. The closing num- 
ber was given by twelve young ladies. 
dressed in white garments with gold trim- 
mings, representing Greek costuming, from 
a bracelet on the left wrist to a band at 
the neck, from which was appended a light, 
long golden chain. The hair and face were 
powdered, causing them to resemble mar- 
ble. They gave a number of Uelsartean 
movements, showing the exercise necesary 
for relaxation and nerve control, followed 
by postures representing watching, listen- 
ing, doubt, recollection, fear, defense, grief 
and triumph, closing with groupings, rep- 
resenting merriment, blessings on the audi- 
ence, and invitation to ccme again. One 
was forcibly reminded of groupings of stat- 
uary of Italian marble in the various liv- 
ing interpretation. The evening clo.-ed 
with a grand march, in which one hundred 
and six took part, and the movements and 
figures were all the more difficult from lim- 
ited space, caused by the audience standing 
on all four sides of the room. The audience 
were delighted, and to satisfy all an annex 
will have to be built to accommodate the 



8 MARCH 1894 



Girls That CanRttn and Jump 

Over 100 oi our townsfolks witnessed 
and applauded the gymnastic enter- 
taintneDl of the youDg lady students of 
the Normal School on Saturday eve- 
nine. The work of the Model School 
pupils was p irticularly interesting. A 
class of thirty-two young ladies illus- 
trated llie poetry of motion by swing- 
ing Indian clubs. The Seniors gave a 
quadrille, the Juniors gaye an exhibi- 
tion with long poles, and a class of 
fourteen performed well on the parallel 
bars. The club swinging of Mies Grace 
Hillyer was particularly line.'- 



Normnl Notes. 



—During the vacation the footnfarka'on 
the floor at the gymnasium are being re- 
palDled. This Is done in order that the 
pupils may know exactly how- far apart to 
stand wnlle practicing^ Indian club and 
dumb-bell exercises. 



Department of Physical Education, 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 



F'wst Semes in Club Suuinging. 

Commence all movements with right hand or to the right 
side and swing each 8 times. 



1. Heart-shaped circle to the right side. 

2. Heart-shaped circle to the left side. 

3. Reverse heart-sniped circle with right hand. 
4 Reverse heart-shaped circle with left hand. 

5. Double heart-shaped circle to right side. 

6. Double heart-shaped circle to left side. 

7. Short shoulder-circle to right side. 

8. Short shoulder-circle to lett side. 

9. Reverse short shoulder-circle with right hand. 

10. Reverse short shoulder-circle with left hand. 

1 1 . Complete circle to right side. 

12. Complete circle to left side. 

13. Reverse complete circle with right. 

14. Reverse complete circle with left. 

15. Lower front circle and reverse with right. 

16. Lower front circle and reverse with left. 

17. Double pendulum to right and left, shoulder high. 

18. Over-head parallel with right. 

19. Over-head parallel with left. 

20. ^ouble outside drop circles with pendulum to right and 

left alternately. 

21. Double outside drop circles forward. On the eighth circle 

make inside drops and bring clubs under the arms. 



36 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



AMULET" MARCH 1894 



The Girls' Gymnastic 

That gymnastics have lost none of their 
popularity in this community was clearly 
evideit on Saturday evening, March 3d, 
the date of the annual exhibition by the 
Normal young ladies. 

Probably few occasions ever drew to- 
gether so many people at the Normal 
School as were assembled to witness this 
event. It was expected that the audience 
would be a very large one, and every effort 
was made to accommodate as many as pos- 
sible. At least two hundred more seats 
were provided than at any previous exhibi- 
tion, but it was found impossible to seat all 
who came. Between two and three hun- 
dred persons were compelled to stand dur- 
ing the entire evening. Conservative esti- 
mates placed the number in attendance at 
twelve hundred. 

It was not only the vast crowd, but even 
more the character of the audience which 
deserves mention, and it was this, especially, 
which gratified the directors of the gymna- 
sium, the school authorities, and the girls 
who worked so hard to make the enter- 
tainment one worthy of the school. 

We believe that there has rarely been an 
entertainment at our school where each in- 
dividual who took part seemed to feel so 
much responsibility as was manifested all 
during the time of practice for this exhibi- 
tion ; and this, more than anything else, 
contributed to the general excellence of the 
work. 

No wonder the old students are coming 
back to these events as they do to the an- 
nual society reunions, and to the graduating 
exercises. The exhibitions may in truth 
be styled gymnasium anniversaries, and are 
well worthy of celebration. 

As in the boys' entertainment the pro- 
gram was augmented by the excellent work 
of the model pupils. Thirty-two boys and 
girls belonging to the advanced model 
class gave a splendid exhibition with dumb- 
bells and in free gymnastics; the exercises 
all being entirely different from those given 
at the boys' entertainment. The work of 
the model pupils was greatly appreciated 
last year, but it was remarked by several 
who saw them on both occasions, that the 
work this year was much more precise and 
spirited. 



Exhibition. 

Ever since the gymnasium was started, 
club swinging has been one of the most 
popular forms of light exercise, both among 
the young men and the young women. 
Doubtless this is because the movements 
are more difficult to master and afford 
greater opportunity for display of skill and 
grace than any other piece of light appara- 
tus. Seldom does one find a class of thirty- 
two young ladies who can give as good a 
display of club swinging as was shown 
here. The audience could not restrain 
their admiration, and several times burst 
into applause at the sight of some of the 
difficult movements executed with such ease 
and perfect time. 

It was a happy thought of Mrs. Ehinger 
to have one thing on the program to con- 
sist entirely of ordinary class work per- 
formed by all the members of a regular 
class. The tendency in such exhibitions is 
to pick a few of the brightest and most 
proficient students, and to select exercises 
rather more for their ornamental effect than 
their usefulness as exercises. Hence the 
" Marching and Free Gymnastics," by the 
young ladies of the 1.45 p. m. class was 
put in to demonstrate that the every-day 
work done by a regular class was worthy 
of exhibition. 

The Dumb-bell Quadrille by thirty-two 
members of the Senior class was one of the 
most beautiful things on the program. The 
class, after a little marching, was marshalled 
into a column of four eights, and at a com- 
mand from Mrs. Ehinger, quickly arranged 
themselves into four sets as for a regular 
quadrille, then to the music of the " Oxford 
minuet " went through many beautiful and 
effective figures, keeping time by striking 
the wooden dumbbells together. At inter- 
vals pretty attitudes were assumed, these in 
turn giving way to fancy steps, wheelings, 
grand chains, classes, &c, the time of the 
music and the accompanying steps varying 
from the slow stately minuet to a lively 
galop. The sets at times would appear to 
be hopelessly confused, but by a rapid 
movement and quick change each member 
of the set was in her place, ready to advance, 
retreat, or salute to the measured cadence of 
the minuet. To many, the dumb-bell quad- 
rille was the most remarkable and interest- 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 37 



ing exercise of the evening, and numerous 
were the expressions of approval and con- 
gratulation showered upon the Senior young 
ladies. Each Senior's jaunty Tarn O'Shan- 
ter cap was decorated with a single daisy, 
the class flower, and all wore neckties of 
the yellow and white. 

The class in heavy work upon the parall- 
el bars and rings gave an exhibition which 
pleased the audience immensely. The feats 
performed by these young ladies gave rise 
to many expressions of amazement, and not 
a few were at first concerned for the safety 
of the participants. This anxiety proved 
groundless, however, for the young ladies 
went through the exercises without the 
slightest mishap, and with an ease and grace 
which soon reassured the on-lookers, and 
convinced them that the training of the 
young ladies had been so thorough as to 
render any accident very remote indeed. 

The jumping from the rings excited 
much enthusiasm. Misses Anna Hughes, 
Esther Wildman, Mary Bower and Madge 
Johnson, proved themselves exceptionally 
skilled on both of these pieces of apparatus. 

After a very pretty piano duett by the 
Misses Elsie Connell and Anna Morgan, 
" Gymnastic Pie " was served to the audi- 
ence by a class of thirty-two young ladies. 
This proved a very beautiful and taking 
thing, and gave new evidence of Mrs. 
Ehinger's wonderful genius for arranging 
unique and original drills. The snapping 
of fingers, clapping of hands, stamping of 
feet, combined with graceful arm circlings, 
courtesying and pretty fancy steps, united 
to produce one of the prettiest drills ever 
witnessed at the Normal. The class run- 
ning which terminated these effective ex- 
ercises was by all odds the best running we 
ever saw by a class of young ladies. It 
was clean, light running, and in perfect 
time. 

Miss Grace Hellyer demonstrated by her 
exhibition with the Indian clubs that young 
ladies can handle them with as much ease 
and skill as the young men. She executed 
most all of the complicated movements 



known to club swingers, and did.it in a 
manner which won for her prolonged and 
vigorous applause. 

Few persons suspected how much could 
be accomplished in a gymnastic way with 
a dozen poles twelve feet long and one and 
a-half inches in diameter. The Junior girls 
presented one of the prettiest sights of the 
evening, as they filed onto the floor all 
wearing bright red ties, brighter faces, and 
a cluster of carnations in their hair; they 
were indeed quite radiant, and worked with 
a vim worthy of one of the brightest junior 
classes the Normal has ever seen. 

As the six sections, each grasping two 
of the poles, went through the novel and 
picturesque motions and" attitudes, they pre- 
sented a pretty sight, and the audience was 
not slow in showing their appreciation of 
the fine work. The Junior boys were in 
ecstacies, and yelled themselves hoarse. 

-From a purely artistic standpoint the aes- 
thetic drill was the most attractive feature 
of this splendid program. The Greek robes, 
powdered hair, gold bracelets and chains, 
the pretty hands and tapering arms they 
poised and undulated in graceful curves 
made a fine picture. It seemed wonderful 
how such movements could be so harmoni- 
ously executed by a dozen persons. The 
postures and groupings were splendid por- 
trayals of the emotions, and will not soon 
be forgotten by those so fortunate as to see 
them. 

A " grand march " brought the entertain- 
ment to a close, and dismissed one of the 
most gratified audiences which ever assem- 
bled in the great gymnasium. Every one of 
the one hundred and six young ladies who 
took part in that last march felt that it was 
a triumphal march. 




Charlotte Hardee Director of Music 
and Author of the Alma Mater 



38 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



10 DECEMBER 1894 



rpHIRD ANNtJAl. 

GYMNASTIC EXHIBITION', 

Given by the 

Young men and model sTUDKNra 

OF THE -WEB* CHESTER 

State.,l^ormal School 

NORMAL GYMNASIUM 

Class Rue rnsrs In free ClymnMtlo*, Indian OloosA 
Dumb iieuu, Wands and Bar Bells. 
Class and Indlvldnal exeiclses on the Vaultlni 
lluck, Parallel Bars, llorlsontal B»r, Spring -Board, 
High Jumping, Acrobatic Feats. Pyramids, etc 



r. D 



RIDAT, i-'ECKMBER 



14m,, 



AT 7.30 i. Jf. 



A* 7.30 P. M, 



Reserved Scats , -.— i« 85 Cents 

General Admission.: ».u. u — i.. -....■. 26 C'enta 

Children .". ;...■.: JO Cents 

» ja-Tloketoi now on Bale at Rupert's* 



8 DECEMBER 1894 



. Huts' tiynumattos* 

On Friday evening next the annual hoys'- 
evmiiHSllo entertainment will be given In 
the "llyrn" at tbe State Normal School and. 
tickets for the same will be on Bale at Ru-- 
pert's on Monday morning next. The aflalr 
promises to bo a credit to Hie school, and nil 
who attend will he sure of receiving mu:u 
entertainment of a highly enjoyable char- 
acter. 



8 DECEMBER 1894 



About the Normal* 

Yesterday afternoon the doori at the .Nor- 
mal Gymnasium were found locked and all 
applicants for admission received -word that 
tne private rehearsals for the coming ex-' 
hibition have begun. Unilormed classes wiil 
be a special feature this year. 



»AKT 



'Hint ! Jump !! Snlni !!l 
Went Chewier Gym." 



Department of Physical Education, 

West Chester State Normal School, 
West Chester, Pa. 



QypT?r?a§tie J^ntepiair-^er^t 




^giisss^igkjs&msi 



Normal Gymnasium, 

^piday Gv/eipirpg, Secerobep 14tr?, 1894 

AT 7:30 O'CLOCK. 

Proceeds for the benefit of the Gymnasium. 

pro^rapv 



THOMAS, PHINT1R, WIST CHtSTtR. 

»AKT II. 



I. CLASS EXERCISES ON PAR \l. I. hi. BARS. 



i. FREE GYMNASTICS Primary Model Students 

,. WANI) ukii I Advanced M.nlel Students >■ CLASS EXERCISES ON VAULTING BUCK. 



,. MILITARY AND FANCY MARCHING DRILL. >• (:l ASS EXERCISES ON FLYING RINGS. 

Young Men nf the Junior Class 

4. SPECIAL CLASS IN CLUB SWINGING. 

4. DUMB HELL EXERCISES . Young Men of the Junior Class Messrs. BucWman, Buslvmg, Hart, Sproat. Hoopes, Grcen\\ooJ. 

5. CLUB SWINGING Young Men of the Senior Class 5- CLASS EXERCISES ON HORIZONTAL BAR. 

fi. BAR-BELL liHII.I Young Men of the Senior Class r,. CLASS EXERCISES IN SPRING-BOARD JUMPING. 

7. FANCY CLUB SWINGING .... Mr. O. F. Monahan 7. ACROBATIC WORK \NI) PYRAMIDS. 



DR. CLYDE E. EH1NGER 39 



15 DECEMBER 1894 




Another triumph in the domain of physical 
culture was scored 
last night, wnen 
the boys of the 
State Normal 
School gave their 
annual exhibition 
of gymnastic work. 
All the evening 
the attention was 
most flattering to 
the young perform- 
e r s who were 
cheered and ap- 
plauded at every 
possible oppor- 
tunity. The seats 
Dr. Ehinger. on the main floor 

were well-filled with an audience from the 
town, and the gallery about nil four aides 
which is used as a running track during the 
regular class work was crowded with 
students all merry with the excitement of 
the occasion. Class colors appeared at both 
ends of the long apartment, the Juniors and 
Seniors at one end aad the Specials at the 
other. ll,* 1 ) ... „_ 

While the spectators were assembling, the 
students chatted with each other, and when 
members ot the Faculty appeared, or mem- 
berg of the Board of Trustees, who were' 
known to the students, the applause was 
sure to greet them from the balcony railiug. 
Not a few n* the Chester countv teachers 
who received a part of their education in tnel 
Normal were in attendance, haying come In 
at the close of the week. i 

LITTLE FOLKS APPLAUDED. , 

The applause was loudest when the MUe,. 
folks from the smaller 
model department ap- 
peared and took • their 
places on the floor. They 
were all dressed in bright 
costumes, and the boys 
wore large epaulets of 
blue on their shoulders. 
For a tew minutes they V*- -4--:?§55 
assumed graeefull atti- " E^S^IsC^ 
tudes, bowed, made 
swimming motions, hop- 
ped, took breathing exer- 
cises and riancea to- 
gether. Then the larger Mrs ElINQKB . 
model pupils came and 
took the front for a tew moments while their 
smaller companions rested, but the little ones 
were soon ready to assist, and together the 
members of the two classes practiced, 
finishing just in time to make room tor the 
Junior boys, twenty-four in number, who 
next appeared, their blue uniforms and white 
belts making such a pretty show that the 
Junior girls in the gallery could not restrain 
their emotions, hut shouted the yell of '90, a 
jargon which proved most inspiring to the 
-b<iya.in_ the class. 

DIFFICULT FIGURES. 
While Dr. Ehinger gave the words of com- 
mend the young men marched back and 
forth across the floor and made numerous 
figures, as stars, diamonds, crosses and sev- 
eral letters, with a precision which would 
have done credit to soldiers in the regular 
army. At the close of their foot drill they 
hastily took up their dumbbells and used 
them in the customary way with the prettiest 
of effect, all to the time of a march which 
Mrs. Ehmger played. Three Specials, How- 
ard Moses, William Hemphill and. Robert 
ETans,werein the class assisting the Juniors, 
whose names are as follows: 
W. Bartholomew, 
Walter Dengler, 
Cllflord Garrett, 




Henry Groff, 
C. Vincent Hart 
Harry Lucas, 
Norman Rahn, 
Hnrry-SaylOFr 
Oscar Smith, 
Lindsey Sproat 



Abram Brower, 
James Field, 
Walter Greenwood, 
Francis Mailman, 
Leon Lapp, 
Wilson Moyer, 
Raymond Rogers, 
Edgar Sen ?en t ct: , 
Monroe Smith, 
John Stetler, 



George Wendel. 



SENIORS GREETED. 

When the Juniors marched to one side.the 
Seniors appeared, wearing dark pantaloons, 
red shirts and red ties.in token of their class. 
Then was a time ol yelling as the girls made 
themselves hoarse in competitive cheering. 
Junior and Senior voices trying to outdo 
each other, and the score being a tie in every 
instance, as the "Hullabaloo" and "Rah,- 
Eah. Rah," re-echoed through the building. 

Indian clubs were the tools of the Senior 
Class, and to fay they were well used is but 
to repeat a well-known fact, for as long as 
the young men of '96 were before the 
audience not a suggestion of an error was seen. 

After a few moments they exchanged the 
Indian Clubs for the bar bells, or wands with 
wooden knobs on the ends, and with these 
proved themselves equally skillful. Before 
departing they were joined by the Juniors 
with dumbbells, and both classes worked for 
a little while together. These are the names 
of the Senior boys:^ 
Jacob Busbong, Edgar Butler, 

Wlllard Campbell, E. P. Conley, 
Eugene Buckman, Daniel Gettle, 
Josepb M. Hurl man, Howard E. Heckler, 
Eugene Heilmaii, Simon G. Huber, 
Harry Kotz, Harry G. Landis, 

William McLaughlin, William Pike, 
Warren Rennlger, Leonard Ruth, 
Heber Sensenlg, Ira Sterner, 

<:. C Sterner, William J. Woy. 

When the boys left the floor several of them 
in some mysterious way found their way into 
the gallery where the girls were, and then 
the yelling was enough to deafen the hearers, 
thou gh the contest was no less a tie than before 

Otto Monahan, whose club swinging was 
the pride of the gymnasium as •long as he 
was connected with the Normal, and who had 
come on from New Haven in order to appear 
in his customary role, performed as well as 
ever, and won tor himself a hearty encore, 
the only one of the evening. 

ON PARALLEL BARS. 

Following this came the parallel bar exer- 
cises in which all the performers did re- 
markably well, but Charles F. Werner, the 
assistant to Dr. Ehinger, proved himself the 
hero of the party. Mr. Werner is fortunate 
in having had professional experience which 
makes him more confident than some of the 
students. Dr. Ehinger and Mr. Monahan 
were also excellent in this. 

JUMPING THE BUCK. 

On the vaulting buck the boys had further 
opportunity of showing their skill, goingover 
it forward and backward, and occasionally 
falling on the mattresses which were pre- 
pared to receive them. 

During this portion of the programme the 
colors of the Seniors, the Juniors and the 
Specials floated aloft. They had been con- 
cealed while the first part was being carried 
out, but strings attached to them drew them 
from their hitting places at the most oppor- 
tune moment, allowing them to wave in 
sight of the spectators. These and the hand- 
some bouquets presented to Dr. and Mrs. 
Ehinger, Mr. Werner and Mr. Monahan were 
pleasing numbers not on the programme. 

A SPICE OF DANGER. 

When the flying rings were resorted to, 
and the boys began turning somersau!t9 in 
mid-air a dozen feet above the ground, the 
spice of danger which was involved made the 
audience hold the breath in fear lest some 
fhhe motion Bhould send a performer flying 
across into the midst of the spectators. 

In fancy club swinging a class of six mem- 
bers, Messrs. Buckman, Bushong, Hart, 
Sproat, Hoopes and Greenwood appeared to 
good advantage, aud these gave place to the 
class on the horizontal bar. The boys work- 
ine on this performed many graceful feats, 
frequently taking risks which made the 
people shiver. While this was going on there 
was much applause but no yelling. The 
siring board jumping and acrobatic work 
were also exciting, and last of all came the 
pyramids, in which the men were heaped 
upon each other a dozen to fifteen feet high. 
In the spring board contest there was a tie 
between Bushongand Buckman, whojunipcd 
seven feet six inches, and thus broke th> 
school record by three inches. 

The ushers last evening were Messrs. 
Bechtel, Johnson, BertoletMitehell, Thomas, 
Monahan, and Evans. Tickets for the main 
floor were taken by Isaac Roberts, and those 
for the gallery were in charge of Ed Me- 
Fadden. 



ATHLETIC NORMAL BOHS 

OIVE A FINE EXHIBITION IN THE 
GYMNASIUM. 

15 DECEMBER 1894 

The Program was long, and Each Member 

wa» Applauded by the Audienc — A 

Record Broken. 



The gynrvirlic entertainment given 
last evening in 'he Vormal Gymnasium 
was fully up and beyon'' the usua' 
standard, but not as well attended as 
the one in February last, when rain and 
fog was the condition of the weather 
instead of the beautiful moonlight of 
last evening. Mrs. Ehinger was pianist 
for the evening and knew just when to 
accelerate or retard the measure. The 
only fault that can be found was that 
the program was too long, keeping 
the audience until 10.45. 

The first number by the model pri- 
mary scholars was very attractive, Lit- 
tle Grace Cochran, daughter of the pro- 
fessor, one of the performers, scarcely 
reaches her instructor's knee. A wand 
drill displayed new and intricate move- 
ments, Bessie, daughter of Mr. W. C. 
Williams, is quite graceful and accur- 
ate. The two numbers combined in a 
rill at the close. As the various classes 
came on the floor the yells of each were 
given. The running track, used as a 
gallery, was apportioned and decora- 
ted with the class colors and the build- 
ing echoed with continued yells as a 
favorite appeared. ^In the military drill, 
William, son of Judge Hemphill, more 
closely observed the rule by not swing- 
ing his arms. Various figures were 
formed and the juniors evidently knew 
how to drill. The seniors wore red 
shirts and stripes of the same color 
down the outside seam of their trous- 
ers, while the juniors had white stripes 
and belts. Class colors were unfolded 
and hung from the centre girder of the 
building, being arranged so that a 
string pulled would loose them. Bar 
bells and dumb bells in combined drill 
made an attractive effect. 

Otto Monahan, now assistant instruc- 
tor in the Yale Gymnasium, gave an 
exhibition of club swinging, which it Is 
doubtful can be excelled. The clubs 
were black and inlaid with nickle, 
which made them resemble electric 
flashes in the rapid movements. He 
was heartily encored and received a 
bouquet. 

The second part consisted of exer- 
cises on parallel bars, vaulting buck, 
flying rings, club swinging, horizontal 
bar and spring board jumping, in which 
many novelties were introduced in and 
exceptionally high class of work accom- 
plished. Dr. Ehinger and his assistant. 
Charles Warner, did much to interest 
the audience. Wilfred Curry, a slender 
lad residing in the borough, did some 
excellent vaulting. In the jumping. 
Buckman and Bushong were a tie jump- 
ing seven feet six inches, which breaks 
the school reer-rj by three inches. 

Acrobatic work and pyramids closed 
the program. Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger 
and assistant. Charles Warner, each 
were presented with bouquets. The au- 
dience was made up principally of out 
of town folks, the trustees and their 
families being among the town folks. 
Among the latter were Dr. Levi Hoopes 
and family. Misses Crowell, Ogier and 
Hemphill, Mrs. Plummer Jefferls, Mrs. 
Rees Palmer. Dr. and Mrs. Charles 
Palmer. Chief Burgess and Mrs. M. S. 
Way. Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Windle. Mrs. 
C. W. Roberts and daughter, with sev- 
eral guests. Mrs. W. C. Williams. Mrs 
Rambler and daughter. Mrs. W. H. 
Lindley and many others. 



40 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

West Chester State Normal School, 

West Chester, Pa. 



20 FEBRUARY 1895 




Qn)nasfic 






rntertainiDci)!' 



AT 



fjorn) I (^^ronasiurD. 
FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 22, 1895. 

at 7:.\o o'clock. 

• • • .rrogran) • • • 

PART I. 
r. Marching, - 24 Young Ladies of the 2:ji> 1\ M, Clas\ 

2. Free Gymnastics. " " " 



3. Club Swinging, 

4. Heavy Work, 

Parallel Bars and Flying Rings. 



Class of ;j> Young fadie. 
Class oj it> You 11 ■' l.iiiUt- 



Hun]) Drill, 



24 Young fjidies of tin Senior ( loss. 
PART II. 



1. Ad \ a need Club Swinging, - Class of 10 Young Indies. 

2. Wand Drill, - js Young /jidies of the Junior Class. 

3. '• Down in Ole Virginuy," - Class of 36 Young Ladies. 

4. Aesthetic Gymnastics, - 16 Young Ljidies of the Senior Class. 

5. Minuet — "Gavotte der Kaiserin," " " • u 



6. 



Star Spangled Hanner." — Grand March. 



At tile C.) m. 



•NOHWAXTTSCHO O L,, 



" ida |2vk*iko; FEBRUARY;:^, 

1895. 'Exhibitions of Plain and Taney 
Gymnastics, Including/ Class Drills "In 
Marching ' and : Tree ^Gymnastics, Club 
Swinging. Hoooa, Parallel Bare and Flying' 
Kings, Fancy Club Bwlnglng, Wand Bier-; 
rises, Fancy Steps and ■ Aesthetic Gymnaa- 
Ucs. ■*:. ... .. • *J.I*» - 

■Doors open at 7 o'clock. » (Entertainment begins 

, at 7, BO o'clock. 'Tickets on sale at Ropert'i.^! 

Tuesday morning, February 18. " 

General Admission...- -.- > -30 Centl 

Itarrved Peau . ^.^,.~ 08 Cents 



Children.. 



.ISCsnta 



18 FEBRUARY 1895 



The entertainment to be given thin evening 
nt the Normal "Gym" wllfexcel nil previous^ 
events of Its kind, and there will be a rush 
for seats.- The programme Is as follows: - 

■ part i. „- - 
Marching, 

24 Young Ladles or the 2.80 p. m. Class; 
Free gymnastics, 

24 Y oung Ladles of the 2.80 p. m. Class. 

Club swinging Class of 32 Young Ladies. 

Heavy work (parallel bars and flying rings), 

Class of 10 Young Ladles. 
Hoop drill, 

24 Young Ladles of the Senior Class. 
tart II. 
Advanced clubBwlnglng, 

' Class of 10 Young Ladles. 
Wand drill, 

82 Y'ouug Ladles of the Junior Ciass. 
.'Down Id Ole, Vnglnnv," 

Class of nil Youug Ladles. 
Aesthetic gycinastlcB, 

10 ^ oong Ladles of the Senior Clam. 
Mlnuette, "Gavotte der Kulserln," 

10 Y"oung ladies of the Henlor Class. 
"Stai -Spangled Banner," grand march. 



Several new -wrinkle?, introduced to make 
a pleasing variety in the gymnastic perform- 
ance of the Normal girls, will he seen in the 
exhibition to be given on Friday evening. 
These will occupy a large portioniof the time, 
and much of the class work, wilrTwhich the 
audicncearealready familiar.will beomitted. 

Yesterday afternoon, as the girls in their- 
graceful costumes were rehearsing, the scene 
in the main hall of the gymnasium was one 
which could not but he impressive. On the 
centre ot the floor stood thirty-six women 
all straight, and some especially pretty', 
going through the motions of an old planta- 
tion (Inner-, while a Irio, coinisling ol Misses 
Hardee, timer and Finley, sang "Suiranee 
Kiver." i_ tO 

Willi an expression of sweet sadness for 
days long since gone by, the girls would sigh 
at the words "Far, (nr away," but the faces 
brightened quickly, and every foot beat time 
merrily at the line. • 

"There's where my heart Is turning ever.". 

With hands clasped above the head and a 
look of intense longing which genuine home- 
sickness could hardly excel, came the words 
which close the tamiliar stanza: 

"There's where the old folks stay.*' " 
- "One— two — three— lour — one— two— three 
—four," counted Mrs. Ehinger, who stood 
facing the girls arid inspired them to do their 
best nnil to make the motions so thoroughly 
a part of themselves that the rehearsal would 
seem rather the voluntary action of a band of 
refugees than the work of a trained class. To 
her gratification the members are taking np 
the idea with buch earnestness that a false 
motion or a poor poiC would seem almost im- 
possible. ■ - . •- . 

OTIIllR A1IIS. 
At the close of the singing the banjo, man- 
dolin and guitnr take the place of the 
voices, and another air is started. Thus 
several of the old Southern melodies follow, 
each other, making a delightful combination. 
Girls who take part in this will wear bright 
costumes, of the 'kind which were" most ad- 
mirtd by the plantation residents in the 
nuarters nearly hall a century ago. 
*- -ur.'t.ninger is anxious u» icaru -wnetucr- 
this or a German court dance, "Gavotte der; 
Kaiserin," will 'prove the . more popular.' 
They are very different, and -vet both are so- 
pleasing that It is difficult to anticipate ho w ' 
they will be compared by an audience. ' The-, 
laiter is ft minuet In which the performers 
are supposed to be entertaining the German, 
king, Del'ore whom they are- dignified and 
formal to the highest degree, at the Banje 
time appearing bo quaint as to. be'most'en- 
joyable. "-' "' - - v 

■S8THKTIC SENIORS. 

The drill by the aesthetic seniors, "-which 
made such an impression last year, will be 
repeated, aud ten young ladies from the same 
class will also give a hoop exercise.-? The 
Junior girls contribute an exercise "with 
wands, which ore handled'with perfect grace. 
ADVANCED CLUB SWINGING. ' "'■ 

Another special feature Is the advanced 
club swinging by a class of ten girls, whose 
names ore as follows: Bertha M. Forsythe, 
Avondale; Bertha McElhaney, Mauayunk! 
Clara Kiegbley, Lnndenberg; Lucille Pres- 
toD, Spruce Grove, Lancaster county; Sara 
Darlington, West Chester; Mildred Sproat, 
W'esltown; Elsie Philips, Font; Elsie Ham- 
bleton, Goshen, Lancaster county; Laura E. 
Kocns. Freeland; Lizzie Jones, Linwood. '„.'" 
BOYS TAKING A HAND. 

While the boys of the school regret that 
they cannot be od the main floor to assist 
their elas6mstes, they will be present as most 
interested and enthusiastic spectators. 
Already they are supplying themselves with 
the most flaming of neckties, in which the* 
colors of the respective classes predominate, 
and they have all the yells well practiced. 
Just what turn will be taken in the arrange- 
ment of Ihe class emblems cau not be antici- 
pated, but Ihe likelihood is that the boys will 
be on the lookout for their own colors as usual. 



B 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 41 



GIRLS TRIDMPll 

TKLIR EXHIBITION AfTHE NORMAL A 
GREAT SUCCESS. 



,\ t w Features Drvise«l hy Mrs. ISliiuger 
.*. ■ I id ii Macli ( lunii to J^hsI ECven- 

Id^'b Littr i la 1 nine lit — l^mi tl Im A lis 

M u lit More Impressive i*y Oraceful 

Atiitiult >■ ..nod Work <m the (flying 
Kings ami Parallel llurs. 




isti 




1»VC»CATES of 
of Physical Cul- 
lure for girls 
were in their 
eh- in put last 
night, i o r t I: e 
annual exhibi- 
lion given by 
the y o u n a 
ladies of l lie 
Stale Normal 
Sehoal was a 
t ri it in (i Ii i n 
every way. 
Some I wo hun- 
dred tost pari, 
ami from the 
opeuing bars of 
the music to the 
last wave of the 
Hags they held 
the elose^l at- 
tention ot the 
largo, audience. 
Bouquets were 
presented, as a matter of course, in token of 
lhe high regard in which the managers of I lie 
event are heM by their pupil-. 

FLAGS ONLY. 

Flags were the only articles ot decoration 
used and these were arranged with much 
taste all about the gallery, a large one swing- 
ing above the main entrance, and dozens of. 
smaller ones, adorning all the railings. 
Further decorations might have appeared as 
the night advanced, but these were strictly 
prohibited. 

The audience was one of the largest and 
most representative which has been assembled 
in West Chester this winter, and it included 
many more spectators than have been at some 
of thelpreviousllexhibitions, although every 
one has been well patronized. Many former 
students who are now teaching in various 
parts of the Slate were in attendance, and not 
a tew representatives of other institutions 
came to see what the people of West Chester 
are doing to train theyoungin ways of health- 
ful activity. 

YELLS FROM TIIE GALLERY. 

For some lime before the iperforiuariee be- 
gan the groups ot boys from the Senior. 
Junior andlispccial classes began giving 
their respective yells from the different pam 
off he gallery where the young men were 
located, and tliese evidences ot youthful en- 
thusiasm continued all through the evening. 
HEROINE OF THE NIGHT. 

Applause began when Dr. Ehinger, the 
popular director of the gymnasium, appeared 
at the side door with his most valued assist- 
ant, Mrs. Ehinger, on his arm. She, indeed, 
was the heroine of the evening, tor she led 
the girls ;in nearly all their moveineuts, 
and many of the most taking features of the 
night's entertainment were her own particu- 
lar inventions. 

SPECIAL OIRT.S MARCH. 
Highest approval on the part of the 
ondience was shown when the music began 
and twenty-four girls from one of the classes 
of specials, led by Miss Dorcas Mercer, of 
Normal avenue, filed in and began marching 
on the smooth floor. They wore the skirts 
and blouses ot blue, with black hose and 
pink butterfly neckties, the whole appear- 
ance being suggestive of that free, graceful 
aclinn which tends toward the making of 
healthy bodies. These girls are all growing, 
and in training them the object is to 
secure the best development in accordance 



witn perlect health. For several minutes 
they marched nud countermarched to the 
music, wheeling and facing with utmost pre- 
cision. Then they took positions at a little 
distance from each other, and went through 
a series ot motions, as reaching, poising 
swimming, hopping, skipping, to the time of 
the music. Finallv, when almost enhaosted 
as one might think, they marched oat and 
-djsapaeare<l,_gJ Ting place to a_ cja_si of 32 
oihcitc who wcie JitVit'.i 111 nfi sr.me waj,~ 
with the^ exception of white bows instead of 
pink. Those whe had first appeared were 
the following; '" ■ 
Edna Speakman, Matrgle Eaebus, 

Mabel Dudley, Laura Mcllvaln, '■ 

Emma McDowell, Florence Talley, 
Amy Frances, Nellie Le Carpenter, 

Mnbel Hellyer, Klsle Delwller, 

Ella Happersett, Marie Yarnall, 

Cecelia Black, Antta Wilson, 

Ethel Dnrlinglon, Rebecca Wood, 
Mary James, Susie Byler. 

Lizzie Kecch, Anna Yardlev, . 

1'orcas Movcer, Edith Foster," 

Alberta I'ecbin, Bertha Paul, 

Anna (jqodwln. 

CLCBS LED. 
The new-comers carried Indian club;, with 
which they did most excellent work, p?r- 
forming difficult teats and taking most grace* 

i») sttitodes tritiifheir clubs.- Tisk-muaei- 
w ore as fol lows: 

Elsie Philips, Lizzie Kershner, 

MlnnStileler, Etbcl Darlington. 

Florence Griffith, ' Mabel Dud'ey, 

Laura Koons.i Mary Tavlor, ■ 

Alice Pennypacker, Kara Darilnglon, 

Mand Baker. Bessie Evans, 

J arn Sbnrpless, Mary Wood, 

Madge Johnson, Mabel Houseal, 

Maud Martin, Lucille Preston, 

i nrrle Morris, Lizzie Jones, 

Linda Keecb, Bertha Forsythe, 

Anna Goodwin, Bertha Mcllhaney 
HEAVY WORK. 

Afler. these came sixteen other', who 
worked on the parallel bars nud Drnv^d 
llnmsevles quite as snpple as dirt their 
brothers and comins only a few months ago. 
I'M of their strikine Ieat9 was the torraing of 
a pyramid composed ot nearly a dozeu young 
ladies, of whom the two at the ends of the 
'ine stood on their heads with as good equili- 
brium as any newsboy on the streets of West 
Chester. From the Iwrizonta] bars they went 
to the flying rings, where they were equally 
at home, suspending themselves by hand or 
feet with perlect ease. One of them. Miss 
McKinstry, swung in mid air supported with 
one ring about her ankles and another about 
her neck, and nllerward she sat in the two 
rinf s, with one girl standing on her shoulders 
and another swinging to her feel. In this she 
proved the feminine Sumson of the evening. 
The class consisted of the following: 
Gertrude Baker, Matt le Smedley, 

Cecelia Black, Lizzie Jones, 

Laura Mcllvaln, Marie Yurnall, 

Elsie flambletou, Ethel Beven, 

Mary Haves, Clara Keighlev, 

Olive Pearson, Laura swariz. 

Emily Hayes, Gertrude MeKinslry, 

Nellie Happersett, Emma McDowell, ' 
SENIORS WITH HOOFS. 
Twenty-four young ladies of the Senior 
Class, carrying red hoops and wearing Co-- 
tunics trimmed in the same color, gave a de- 
lightful hoop drill, which ended with the 
prettiest of dunces. Then the Seniors bowed 
gracefully and passed out ot sight amid a 
babel of yells which would have shaken 
down the roof but for the heavy brace which 
supported it. By this time it was assumed 
that the exihibition could not fail l> Ik a 
ereat success. The members of Ibis class 
were these: 

Maud Moses, Lelta Fronefleld, 

Mnttic Smedley, Mary Gritlith, 

Susie Smcd:e\, Jessie Gunkle, 

NellieTurner, liebecca lieatou, 

Maud Wenlherill. Ella Heller, 
Nellie Williams, Bessie Hemphill, 

Aiurlbn. Blair. Etta Lappa, 

Mary Snyder, Sallie Liggett, 

Annie Clauder. Carrie Davis, 

Evalina Darlington, Laura Eisenbrev, 
L'nily Dannnker, Anna Pusey. 

Anna letters, Florence Broslus, 



ADVANCED CLUB WORK. 

Ten young ladies who have had much 'ex- 
perience in eluh swinging occupied the floor 
for a few minutes and showed remarkable 
skill in handling the billets. 

"The man who selects a wife from that 
party ought to be sure she is sweet tempered,"' 
r< marked a ladj in the audience as the clubs 
wenl whirling round and round so rapidly 
that they could seaicely be seen. Never dur- 
ing the whole performance was there a sound 
of i he clubs striking together, though they 
came wonderfully near it at every turn. 
Thts class emhrneed the following : 
Sarah Darlington, Lizzie Jones, 
Mlldrtd sproat, BeithaForsvthe, 

I aurn Kooiis, Bertbu Mcllhaney, 

Elsie Hxmbleton, Clara Kelihley, ' 

Lucille Preston, Elsie Philips, 

Jl NIORS WITH WANDS. 

Tl irly-two girls from the Junior Class, 
wearing the colors blue and whit6, were 
grtcKd with a jell from a score ot nous* 
throats belonging totheir male classmates in 
the callcry. These 'pretty ones, who will lie 
graduated in 18%. carried wands with the 
class ribbon on them, and with these they 
j crloimid the onstomnry movements in ex- 
c.lhnl stvle. Here aie their names: 
Cora Green, Delia Williams, 

1 nuiH Keiebley, Clara Keiehley, 

Annie AlleOHCh. Edith Byerta, 

M:. hel Woodward, Bertbn Forsythe, 
Julia Gyaer, F.lsle Hnmhieton. ■ 

1 mncFR Knrpn, Beri ha Mcllhaney, 

Emily Worstml, Nellie SpeRkman, 

rTaura Sbrawder,~ !7: ~Cllla HlddlesdnT *■ '**-; 
MnfcefWilson, Ethel Beven, 

Bessie Mattern, Etta Williams, 

Anna Leatherman, Daisv Houck, 
MaryElliok, Iva Mearns, 

Lucille Preston, Antoinette Wintzer, 

AdaCriswell, Ida Neidig, 

JosephineWiddlcomb.Emma Comly, 
Mary Sbarpless. • 
OLD PLANTATION AIRS. 

"In Ole Virginny" wasa specialty devised 
■by Mrs. Ehinger, and in it the house was 
I captivated as it had not been before during 
.the evening. Beginning with "Yankee 
.Doodle," ns played on the piano by Miss 
> Gentry -and on banjos, and banjorme3 and 
.guilars by Harry S. Johnson, Miss Era 
Le Fevre, Miss Annie Allebach, and Miss 
Katheriue Wagner; the girls clanped their 
c hands in glee as thought delighted with the 
music. Then they tripped lightly toother 
bars and deuced w ilh much grace at the end 
.This merged into "Old Folks at Home " 
Cjirve Dat Possum" and "Dixie," finally 
swinging back to" Yankee Doodle." With this 
the people would not be satisfied until it had 
been repeated three times. For every senti- 
■ment there was an appropriate poise or 
gesture and every one of these was admir- 
able. 1 hese were the participants: 
Mary Wood, Cecelia Black, 

Maud Baker, Dorcas Mercer, 

Laura Koons, Nellie Le Carpenter, 

Gertrude Baker, Alverta Peculn, 

niadge Johnson, Linda Keech 

Jessie Chrlsman, Laura Keighlev, 

Ella Anders, Clara Kelghley, 

Gertrude McKinstry, Mabel Dudley, 

.Edith Foster, Jean Wallace, 

Mary Rittenhouse. Iva Mearns, 

:.OIive Pearson, . Mary Haves, 

(Naomi Sbenaman, Florence 'Griffith. 

•Laura Mcllvaln, Elsie Philips 

Fnima McDowell, Ella Cornell, 
Rebecca Wood, Bertha Forsvthe, 

Ella Happersett,' Mildred Sproat, 

Utile Warner, ' Marie Yarnall, 

t- Nina Stlteler. 

• In the "Old Folks at Home" they were 
accompanied 'by a vocal quartet consisting 
of Misses Hardee, Finley.Urner and Seibert.' 

STATELY SENIORS. 

Stately Seniors wearing Delsarte gowns of 
pink aud white, next took possession, win- 
ning every heart by their grace and beauty. 
Their hair was silvered and (he simplicity ot 
the dress gave them the appearance of Col- 
onial dames. 

They closed with "Gavotte der Kaiseim " 
a stalely dance supposed to be given before 
the German King. In ii the height ot grace 
seemed to be reached. The names of the per- 
formers are these: 



42 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



Mflutt MofU-s, 
Mary (irltlitli, 
Anna Itotrers 
Nelllo Turner, 
Susie XinPdley, 
(Julrude Johnson, 
Lelin lMoncrield, 
Jessie OunKie, 



Katuerlue 1'yfer, 
Annn 1'usey, 
Ella Heller, 
I.aura Elsenbrey, 
ltebecca Jienton, 
Mary .suyder, 
Nellie Williams, 
Mary Powell. 
PATRIOTIC MARCIIIXO. 
The evening's jn'ribrruunce ended with the 
grurxl march, in which nearly all who lia'l 
pnrtic ipntiil during the evening appeared, 
cunjiug Hogs, which they waved triumph- 
antly as a farewell. 

l-OllJlElt STUDENTS RICTlItN'. 

Many former stuilcuttj were among the 
.'l-iclaiors hist evening, and among these 
were the lollowtng: Misses Gerlniiie Me- 
C'uuiia, Ship Kotul; Essie Daniels, Modcmi; 
Kiizuheth Snplee, Coatesville; Bessie Trapp, 
U'f.-t Cliisier; M. Adele Itiiily, Ooriime; 
Anna Morgan, r'airview Village; Mary 
J.. Fellers, Glen-Loch; Edith Miller, 
M. Charlotte White, Bethlehem; Leila O 
Ueiller, Anselma; I.aura K. Guycr, Honey, 
brook; Nellie l.'ornwell, Lionville; Hannah 
1\". SlmuIi, Ashhourne; Carrie Minster, Bris- 
tol; Belle lleiil, l'arkeshurg; Marian Itatce- 
Mtraw, Christiana. 

Messrs. Frank K. Waller, Unionvillc; 
Theodore Morgan, l-'airview Village; Warren 
/.. Anders, Worcester; George McCracken, 
Upland; Andrew Beehtel,Boyertown; Hiram 
Keller, Bednunster; Charles C. liobercs, 
Martin Academy, Kenuett Square; ltofiney 
liadelill, Warrington; Irwin 1'luiii, 'J'erje 
Hill; .Sherman S. Burr, Jeukiototvn. 
oil 1 Kit OUKSTS. 

From Malvern came a party of citizens, 
.•nice 01 whom were members ol the classes, 
mid others were present as interested Iricnds. 
They were Mis'cs Flora and Jennie Holt- 
man, Margaret K. ltnth, l.ida MePlierson, 
Miijjgic I'.mhiis, Elsie Helwilcr, Mis. J. 
■loins Slill mid two daughters, George 
Hippie, Malvern, and Miss I.aura Angle, 
Slraltord. 

Mr. and Mrs. Christian Lapp nnd W. 
Manner Davis were among the representa- 
tives from the Chester Valley. 

Hon. and Mrs. Thomas J. Philips, ol' At- 
gleu, were among Hie spectators, and they 
ipent the night at the home of the Principal. 

28 FEBRUARY 1895 

The Gymnastic Exhibition — 
The gymnafltic exhibition by about two 
hundred of the pretty-girls of the Went 
Chester State Normal School in the 
Gymnasium, last Friday evening, was 
a complete success and attracted a 
very large crowd of people from our 
town and nearby sections. Much 
praise aud credit are not only due to 
the youne ladies who so ably took part, 
but to Dr. and Mrs.' Ehinger, the 
directors of physical culture at the 
school, who so efficiently planned the 
exercises and drilled the participants. 
The exhibition Included hoop and wand 
exercises, club swinging, class drills in 
marching and free gymnastics, move- 
ments on the parallel bars and swing- 
ing nogs, (esthetic gymnastics, and 
other pleasing diversions, concluding 
with au inspiring and patriotic graDil 
march "The Star-Spangled Banner." 
The various exercises were greeted 
with enthusiastic and prolonged ap- 
plause. Besides the gymnastic ex- 
hibition there was some banlo and 
guitar music by Miss Altebach, Harry 
B. Johnson, and others, and some sweet 
vocal selections by Misses Hardee, 
Finley, Urner and Siebert. The 
decorations were tasty and included 
numerous American ■ flags. Mrs. 
Ehinger was presented with a charm- 
ing bouquet of beautiful and fragrant 
flowers. The entertainment was great- 
ly enjoyed. 



"AMULET" MARCH 1895 

The Gymnastic Exhibition. 

That the West Chester State Normal 
School stands in the foremost raul: of edu- 
cational institutions is evidenced by the 
way in which the advanced movements 
of the day are adopted, and by the man- 
ner in which this forward march is ap- 
preciated by the former students who re- 
turn in ever increasing numbers to the 
familiar walls of their Alma Mater. The 
third annual gymnastic exhibition given 
by the young ladies took place on the 
evening of February 22d, and as many 
old students returned to attend this enter- 
tainment as were here to the last Moore 
Auniversary. 

The weather was superb, the great 
gymnasium was bright with many flags, 
large and small, used for decoration in 
honor of Washington's birthday. The 
three arc lights which had heeu put in 
shone upon the bright faces. o< the thou- 
sand or twelve hundred people who had 
assembled to do honor to "the girls," and 
an especial radiance was visible on the 
proud expectant faces of the mothers and 
fathers who had come, many of them 
from a distance, to see their daughters 
carry through their part in the entertain- 
ment 

Just at a quarter before eight the strains 
of a lively march gave the signal for the 
first class to appear. This was made up 
of twenty-four members of the 2.30 P. 
M. class, all dressed in the usual gymna- 
sium costume of dark blue flannel 
divided skirt and blouse waist, ornament- 
ed for the occasion by a delicate pink 
necktie and a pink rose with its dark 
glossy leaves. They went through a 
number of military manoeuvres with 
such precision of time and beauty of 
form that even the old soldiers present 
were delighted, and only words of ap- 
proval fell from the lips of the large au- 
dience. This, and the free gymnastics 
which followed, illustrated the regular 
gymnastic lesson as given daily to all the 
Normal students. No attempt was made 



at fancy work in these two numbers, all- 
round development, rhythm, and correct 
carriage being the object of the exercises. 
Ai, their work was completed and they 
marched out the boys in the gallery gave 
their " class yell " as their favorite mode 
of expressing their approval. 

The echoes had hardly died away when 
a class of thirty-two young ladies carry- 
ing Indian clubs filed in. White silk 
neckties were the only distinctive feature 
of their eostnme. 

The work of this class was without a 
flaw. Though the movements were not 
difficult, they were done with a grace and 
finish that is the chief charm of that ever 
facinating piece of apparatus. At the 
cloee of the class work several posture 
groupings were held with the steadiness 
of hand and foot which comes only with 
physical training, and the effect was most 
pleasing. Generous applause followed 
the young ladies as they left the floor. 

The rolling out of the parallel bars 
and the letting down of the flying rings 
and the placing of mats gave evidence of 
the heavy work which was to follow. 
When all was in readiness sixteen well 
noised, sturdy young ladies, with a pretty 
bit of orange color at their necks, march- 
ed across the gymnasium floor in pairs, 

sqatutragHstheyTeached the parallel bars. 
Here, as no where else in g>innasium 

work, is the perfect fitness and suitability 
of this divided gymnasium suit demon- 
strated. 

This class was under the direction of 
Dr. Khingcr and the work was done with 
such snap and accuracy, and such perfect 
confidence that all fear for their safety on 
the part of the audience was immediately 
dispelled. Not a bump nor a fall occurred 
as the young ladies vaulted over, en- 
circled and twisted under and between 
the bars, performing many feats that 
would have done credit to then more 
athletic brothers. The exercises upon 
the flying rings were especially difficult 
and well performed. Although the work 
done by these young ladies was of a na- 
ture which is usually performed by the 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 43 



other sex, there was not a movement, the 
propriety of which, in these appropriate 
costumes, would be questioned by the 
most fastidious. 

As twenty-four members of the senior 
class advanced with firm, free step and 
took their places upon the floor, the faces 
of the senior boys in the gallery glowed 
with honest pride, and the cheeks ol the 
young ladies took on a rosier hue as these 
classmates gave the senior "yell" with 
youthful vehemence, from their place in 
the gallery. The senior colors were dis- 
played in the rich, red neckties, the bunch 
of carnations and the cherry hoops which 
they carried. To the measure of a slow 
waltz the pretty movements of the hoop 
drill were successfully performed. Some 
being held as postures, others displaying 
suppleness and grace, the result of their 
winter's gymnastic work. The drill 
culminated in fancy steps and that most 
difficult feat, skipping through the hoop 
keeping step to the music. The 
applause which followed was merited. 
The second part of 'he program began 
with advanced club swinging by a class 
of ten young ladies, five of whom were 
Juniors. Some of the most difficult and 
intricate movements known to club 
swingers were performed in a most credit- 
able manner by these young ladies, and 
"reels," "follows," and " snakes'' suc- 
ceeded each other rapidly. Murmurs of 
pleasure and wonder escaped many lips, 
and when they had finished most gener- 
ous and hearty applause was accorded. 

The wand drill by thirty-two members 
of the Junior class followed. The class 
colors — blue and white — appeared in the 
neckties and large bows held firmly in 
place in the centre of the wands. The 
exercises were varied, and many of them 
difficult, especially the winding move- 
ments, when the wands seemed almost to 
take on a serpentine form. Accuracy of 
time and pcrcision of movement charact- 
erized the drill to its finish. The last 
three of the series were calculated to de- 
velop concentration of attention, for each 



of the six files were performing a differ- 
ent exercise, yet all were so related as to 
form moving tableaux. 

The most unique number on the pro- 
gram, "Down in Ole Virginny," illus- 
trated two of the most opposite qualities 
of movement, namely, — the most rapid 
and vigorous of dancing steps, and the 
statuesque posture with quick transition 
from one movement to another, showing 
the instantaneous obedience of the mus- 
cles to the command of the will. 

The arrangement of this number was 
original with Mrs. Iihinger and prepared 
for this occasion. The first part, show- 
ing lightness and elasticity of step, was 
set to the music of "Yankee Doodle.'' 
The accompanying instruments, the 
guitar, mandolins and banjo, played by 
the Misses Allebach, Le Fevie and Wag- 
ner, and Mr. Harry Johnson, were in per- 
fect harmony with the character of the 
movements. The excellence of the work , 
added to its novelty, drew forth rounds 
of enthusiastic applause from the audi- 
ence. The second and third parts, set to 
the tunes of "Swanee River," and 
"Carve dat Possum," respectively, com- 
bined attitudes and fancy steps, were per- 
formed to a vocal accompainment, a 
ladies' quartette composed of the Misses 
Hardee, Urner, Seibert and Finlay, whose 
rich voices rung through the spacious 
gymnasium with bell-like clearness. 

In the estimation of many, the finest 
part of the program was rendered by six- 
teen young ladies of the Senior class, 
who came upon the floor clad in Empire 
gowns of delicate pink and white, with 
powdeied hair. The graceful stateliness 
of these young ladies as they entered and 
took their places won the admiration of 
all. 

The slow aesthetic movements requir- 
ing such perfect poise and control were 
performed most beautifully to a slow 
waltz. The physicial value of movements 
like these must be practiced to be appre- 
ciated. 



44 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



This concluded, the young ladies form- 
ed into two sets as for a cotillion, and the 
music changed to the meausured minuet 
With a courtsey to the audience and to 
each other, the slow and stately "Gavotte 
der Kaiserin" was begun. The graceful 
balancing, dainty figures and attitudes 
which so delightful the audience must be 
seen to be understood and enjoyed. 
These refined and artistic figures and 
steps were eminently appropriate to the 
occasion since the illustrious Washington 
whose nativity was this day being cele- 
brated throughout the land was both a 
jjatron and exponent of this phase of the 
art These numbers of the program 
were a fitting close to those which pre- 
ceded, illustrating as they did the higher 
ideals of physical development and move- 
ments. At the close of this number Mrs. 
Ehinger was presented with a beautiful 
bouquet of carnations and roses. Miss 
Gentry, the efficient and popular accom- 
panist, was also the recipient of a bouquet. 



The entertainment closed with a grand 
march in which all of the young ladies 
who took»|>art in the entertainment par- 
ticipated. The march was led by four 
Senior and four Junior young ladies as 
standard bearers: Each young lady was 
handed a small flag of the national colors 
as the line stepped off to the inspiring 
strains of the " Star Spangled Banner." 
The leader gradually formed the line into 
a circle which became gradually smaller 
and smaller, until all were massed in the 
centre of the room surrounding the lead- 
ers, when at a signal the large flags car- 
ried by the standard bearers were held 
aloft, making a beautiful centre piece, 
around which the numberless small flags 
waved in unison with the music, forming 
a beautiful bit of color harmony. 

At the command of "Break ranks, 
march!" the flags were lowered, the 
music ceased, and the third annual gym- 
nastic entertainment by the young ladies 
of the Normal School was brought to a 
happy conclusion. 



16 APRIL 1895 



AMATEUR GYMNASTS 
AT THE NORMAL. 

The Philadelphia Turngemeinde Team 
Gives a Fine Exhibition. 



Younjr Men ol Iron Muscle Astonish 
IU«ot Spectators and Swell the Treas- 
ury or the Athletic Association. 

In the gymnasium of the State Normal 
School a tine carnival was given on Sat- 
urday evening under the auspices of the 
Athletic Association. It proved a great 
success, on account of the excellent work 
done and the pleasant manner In which 
the programme passed off. Carl G. 
Shrader acted as Master of Ceremonies. 

The whole affair was an experiment on 
the part of the Normal Athletic Associa- 
tion, which had engaged the young men 
from Philadelphia to come out and give 
an exhibition of high grade amateur 
gvmnastics. The visitors surprised them 
aiid delighted all bv the fine work done 

Defor? half a- dozen bars of Georgia 
Camp Meeting had been played as the 
opening, march bv Miss Florence Rorer, 
the pianist, the performers had satisfied 
the spectators that tbeye were entitled to 
full recognition. 

As an opening number a line of nine, all 
In blue sleeveless shirts, gray knee 
breeches, black hose and bicycle shoes, 
filed in Their muscular development 
was wonderfullv fine, the biceps and tri- 
ceps standing out prominently like plaited 
whipcord, and every muscle of the shoul- 
der and forearm being In fine condition. 
The parallel bars was the first piece of 
apparatus to which they paid attention. 



and on this they did so well that the best 
boys on the Normal team held their 
breath in astonishment. It is no easy 
matter to whirl in cart wheels on the 
bars, but when it comes to balancing In 
midair on one's hands, with feet pointing 
toward the zenith, or to walk deliberate- 
ly on one's hands from one end of the 
bars to the other, and then come down 
in a graceful style on the mat. It Is by no 
means a summer pastime for an ordinary 
man. When It was quietly stated in the 
audience that two of the youn£ men who 
handled themselves In this fashion are 
soon to go to New York to compete Tor 
the International championship in all 
round athletics, and that the others who 
took part are almost as able as these two 
the mvstery of skill was explained. They 
are Charles Mang and Paul Sixtus. The 
captain of the company is Paul YV'endler. 
Other members. Carl Gottwald, Adolph 
Owesuy. John Grieb, Charles Liewis.Max 
Hess. Victor North. 

"Thou Art My Own Love" was sung 
well by a double quartet of young men 
from the Normal School and being en- 
cored, this party responded good-natured- 
ly with "Polly Wolly Doodle. 1 "' the solo 
part being sung by Howell Zullch. Miss 
Hardee piaved the accompaniment. 

William P. Philips, of the Class of '9S, 
who Is now a llaverford College student. 
gave an exhibition of club swinging, an 
art which he first learned when the gym- 
nasium was young, and the skill which 
he showed was bv no means ordinary. 
The glistening black clubs liew through 
the air at lightening speed. In most 
graceful movements, and never once 
Bhnwed the slightest hesitancy or gave 
Blgn of striking together. 

Miss Mnriraret Urlfllth played during 
this performance. 

Exercises on the vaulting horse, which 
came next, were performed In fine style 
by the gymnastic team. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 45 



' It ii ii ! .In in |» !! K Willi !!! 
Mcsi ('hosier <-.v in." 



Department of Physical Fdtication, 

West Chester State Normal S:hool. 
West Chester, Pa. 



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22 February 1895 Show 
Senior Girls Aesthetic Drill 



ffrid^ ^Vei)iog, J)ecen)ber 13th 1895, 



AT 7:30 O'CLOCK. 



Proceeds for the benefit of Gymnasium 

PART I. 



PRQGfiAM 



PART II. 



i. FREE GYMNASTICS Class of Model Students ,. C1,ASS KXERCISKS ON VAULTING HORS1 

"'ARCHING DRILL Youue Men of the Junior Class *»*-A.SS EXERCISES ON FLYINGJUN.GS. 

3. DUMB BELL KXERCISKS .... 



Young Men of the junior Class * EXHIBITION OP BROAD SWORD FENCING 

. Carl Sliriidcr, Oco. Mav 



4. CI.CH SWINGING 



5. BAR BELL KXERCISKS 



Young Men of the Senior Class 



Young Men of the Senior Class 



6. COMBINATION OK BAR BELLS AND DUMB BELLS. 



Senior and Junior Young Men 



4. SPECIAL CLASS IN CLUB SWINGING, 

Messrs. Greenwood. Hallmau, Hart, Lq>;>. Wendcl. Jom~ 



CLASS KXERCISKS ON PARALLEL BARS. 



6. CONTEST IN SI'RINC, BOARD JUMPING. 



7. EXHIBITION OF FOIt, FENCING Mr. Carl Slirnder, Mr. George May ' 



7. PYRAMIDS AND ACROBATICS 



46 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



Bui. I Jump M Bwlo III 
W«sl Chester Uym." 



MIBBRAWI. 



r)ep3rtn)er)t of -Physical FdOcgtioi), 

West Chester State Normal School, 
West Chester, Pa. 




[Jorn)al (jgiDngston), 
prida2 l^Veoiog, J)ecen)ber 13th 1895, 

AT 7:30 O'CLOCK. 
Prwctdi for tkt btmfit of Gymnast* f- 

14 DECEMBER 1895 

ACTIVE NORMAL BOYS. 

Their Annual Exhibition in the Gym Last 
Night. 

YOUNG MEN OF PINE MUSOLE- 



Exciting Feats on the Flying Rings Make the 
Spectators Hold Their Breath— An Evening's 
Performance Which Was a Credit to the 
Town— Class Rivalry Comes to the Front in a 
Merry Fashion— Tiny Tots Delight Their Par- 
ents and Friends. 



Last night the Normal School boys 
scored a signal success in their annual 
gymnastic exhibition. They had ap- 
peared before the public on many pre- 
vious occasions, but never with such 
perfection of movement as they showed 
this season. In all their exercises they 
seemed to have prepared so thoroughly 
that there was little or.no chance for 
mistakes. 

The hei jes of the night, as might have 
been supposed, were the senior boys, 
who, in their white duck pantaloons, 
with blue stripes, made a fine showing 
even before the regular programme be- 
gan. They were as follows, one or two 
others, who are members of the class, 
being kept away by sickness or some 
other cause: 

Abraham Bower, Wallace Bartholo- 
mew. James Field, Henry Groff, Walter 
Greenwood, Clifford Garrett, Walter 
Dengler, Francis Hallman, Vincent 
Hart, H. P. Hottlt. Thomas Johnson 
Leon Lapp, Harry Lucas, Seward Itosen- 
berger, Norman Rahn, Harry Saylor, 
John Stetler, Monroe Smith. Edgar Sen- 
-enich, Oscar Vincent, George Windle, 
Charles T. Windle, William Wayi. 

Scarcely less interesting, and. Indeed, 
more so to many a palpitating heart ii> 
the big galleries, were the Juniors, who 
In gray trousers and orange stripes, 
closely mated their brethren of the class 
of '9t>. The Juniors who participated In 
the night's work were as follows: 



part i. ■ 

L FBEE GVaHASTUS "A» * M*« InlM, 

, ■UCHIMn DB1U. Vaoai Mwo & ih. Jgota CU* 

. OVMB HhLL EHKBCISES »°«S «"'* J 1 """ f"" 

» CLVIi BWIKISIIFR Yam» Hen trf <M BBBBB On. 

j BAB BFLL FBFBUSE* v™* "•" «« <B* "■■*" Cl» 
. COBBIBATIOB OF BAB B 

, R»HIDITVJMOF FOIL PHNCPAO Bt, CrtB E l^l, Bj- Gmtf Mwj 

Ambrose Brough, Oscar Barron. Henry 
Bechtel, John Brltton. Thomas Cope, 
Aquilla Chandler, Harry Derr, William 
H. Davis, Elmer Campbell, J. Thorntoi 
Emrey, George Fetters. C. L. Grimm 
Wallace Heaton, A. E. Leffler, Willlan 
McKtnzie, Frank Nlewig, Spaldiag Lous 
John Paschall, Wayne Sensenig, Irwli, 
Stlteler, Herbert Wagner, Amasa Worth- 
Ington, Patrick Dougherty. 

GENERAL ASSISTANTS. 

At the door Charles Roberts, who Is t 
graduate of the school and now teaclii .-■ 
at Martin Academy, Kennett Square 
old the tickets, which were collected b> 
his brother Isaac. The ushers were J. V 
n. Evans, William Richards, C. V. R 
iCvans, Eugene Stover and Arthui 
Mitchell. 

BEFORE THE OPENING. 

An hour before the programme opened 
the spectators began assembling, an< 
many who were strangers expressec' 
their surprise and admiration at tin 
^ize and beauty of the building's Interior 
Over the railing at the rear of the audi 
fnce was the class colors, pink and blu, 
end white, representing the Seniors an, 
Juniors. The raised seats, with abom 
three hundred chairs, afforded room foi 
.nany of the spectators, while the gal 
lerles were thronged by the students ant' 
their friends. While they waited then 
were numerous explanations of the man 
ner in which the exhibitions are con 
Jucted and the costumes which preva 
rmong the participants and their friends 
'n this way the time was passed pleas- 
antly until the time for beginning. 
LITTLE TOTS APPEAR. 

First to appear were the tiny pupil: 
'n the Model department, the line belni 
led by little girls who apparently coul, 
not have been in the school more thai 
a year. WU.li Dr C. E. Ehlnger as thel 
leader, anil Mrs. Ehlnger ut the plane 
the children went through their move- 
ments with a grace and freedom whicl 
their elders could never acquire, am 
which they themselves may not posses 
a score of years from now. After the: 
had charmed everyone present wit* 
ihelr beautiful work, Dr. Ehinger ex 
.ilained that he sometimes called upo 
x member of the class to act as Ih 
eader; that he was about to do so las 
■vening, and the pupils themselves di, 
lot know who would be called. He there- 
ipon asked little Norman, son of Willlan 
Irubb, South High street, to come for 
ivard and lead the class In movement 
■•vhich were to be announced. The lar 
obeyed directions and led in a manne, 
most creditable to all. 

Next, Elvira, daughter of Harry S 
lohnson, Rosedaje avenue, was caller 
• ipon, an d ' ah^j-lrwthe niftiest panne 
maginaoTe^' came forward to mak 
harge of the class of twenty-four boy 
.ind led In a series of motions which rep-i. 
resented swimming. 

■97 TO THE FRONT. 

Retiring amid a storm of applause, th' 
Modelites made room for the Juniors 
who came forward In uniform, ever: 
member wearing on his left breast tin 
number 97, to indicate that he Is entitle, 
to the honors of the class. For twent: 
minutes the boys drilled backward an, 
forward on the roomy floor, marehlni 
and countermarching, wheeling and turn 
ing with a precision which would hav< 
done credit to the Regular Ai my. Thei 
taking their dumb bells, they performet 
a series of feats and movements witl 
equal accuracy, to the satisfaction of thi 
audience and the rapture of their femi 
nine classmates on the running tracl 
above, who had assembled in one come 
and gave the '97 yell with lungs whlcl 
showed the benefits derived from physi- 
cal training. After the boys had gon< 



PART II — 

i cue sxncisBS on v»i lti a" hobss. 

B CLASS FB6BCTSE, OB FlBlBO BIBF10, 

, FBHlBITKmC.P8BOADBWO»r>FSNCntn iff s 

. BFHCIAL CLANS IN CLUB SWIBOINO, 



I Kir." 



. Ha* IAPF WiwW J™, 



1 ABAI 



■ CLAWrBPB' |,F -' 
A COimWT IN ArBIIK-. BOABP JIMPINO 
, rVBAMins ABU ACBOBAIIO. 



through the evolutions to tne air ot tnr 
"Honeymoon March" and had threatenei 
each other in attitudes of the Corbett- 
Fltzslmmons order, they made room foi 
the bovs of this years class. 

CLUBS AND BAR BELLS. 
With Indian clube and dumb hells the 
Seniors performed, swinging the clubs 
in many graceful ways before taking up 
the bars. In all their performance they 
showed the advantages of long-contin- 
ued training, and they won for them- 
selves much applause and favorable com- 
ment, not failing to secure a generous 
share of \fnal exercise from the girls 
above. Beiore they left the main floor 
they were joined by the Juniors, who re- 
turned with their dumb bells and as- 
sisted In making a number of graceful 
figures. 

As they were about to retire the leader 
of the "juniors, Aquilla Chandler, ad- 
vanced and presented Dr. Ehlnger with 
a beautiful bouquet of flowers which the 
Instructor received with a bow of ac- 
knowledgment. 

FENCING WITH FOILS. 
In concluding the first portion of the 
entertainment, the assistant In the gym- 
nasium, Carl Shrader, and his friend 
George May, of Philadelphia, gave an ex- 
hibition of fencing with foils. First they 
made a few introductory passes by way 
of testing their foils. Afterwards the* 
retired, and putting on great masks the 
size of peach baskets, went to work as 
though they would hack each other to 
pieces, but fortunately, no blood was 
spilled. 

ON THE VAULTING HORSE. 
With two classes at once on the vault- 
ing horses, this exercise was full of ac- 
tion. 

On the flying rings the boys acted in a 
way which made the audience sit breath- 
less, fearing lest some accident should 
occur while the lads were swinging in 
mid air a dozen to twenty feet above the 
mattresses. 

Mr. Shrader and Mr. Way. appearing 
with broadswords, gave a sprightly 
exhlhltion. thpir bout appearing for nil 
the world as though they were at times 
engaged in a death struggle for the mas- 
tery. At the conclusion they were pre- 
sented with a handsome floral offering. 

Messrs. Greenwood, Hallman. Hart. 
Lapp, Wrndel and Jones pave a fine ex- 
hlhltion of club swinging, the special fea- 
ture being that at lirst they stood in a 
row, Indian tile, with a very short space 
between them. So close. Indeed, were 
they that it seemed as though they could 
not help striking each other. 

The classes in parallel bar work, which 
occupied half an hour-, performed rranv 
difficult feats, and finally ended with a 
series of human pyramids in which War- 
ren Cu.ry. of Gay street, stood at the top 
of great mass of muscle. 

Surng the Jumpin- contest, which took 
place at one side of the room, a great 
deal of acrobatic work was going on in 
another quarter. In this the tumbling 
was exceptionally line. The pvrnmlds 
were also formed at this time, thus short- 
ening the programme somewhat. 

Those who took part In this heavy work 
were Ralph E. Yost, Harry Lucas, Chas. 
T. Windle, Leorr Lapp, E. Ambrose 
Brough. J. Harry Wright. Mr. Fox, 
James H. Field, George E. Ward, Fran- 
cis II. Hallman, Frank A. Ilornberger, 
Robert H. Patts, Llewellyn Hoopes, 
Timothy Anderson. O. E. Fox. 

The Jumping contest was close between 
Spalding Long and Leon Lapp. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 47 



"AMULET" JANUARY 1896 

Boys' Gymnastic Exhibition. 

The fourth annual gymnastic enter- 
tainment given by the young men and 
model students of the Suite Normal 
School took place Friday evening, Dec. 
13th, 1S95, and proved even a greater 
success than the precediug ones. The 
audience was large and enthusiastic and 
liberally applauded every number of the 
program. 

The entertainment opened with free 
gymnastic exercises by a class of model 
students, abont thirty in number. The 
work comprises some of the regular class 
movements, followed by more difficult 
and complicated ones, interspersed with 
pretty gymnastic steps and posing exer- 
cises, which were performed with a pre- 
cision and grace that conies only from 
thorough training. 

One of the new features of this number 
was the leading of two of the smaller 
members of the class. Dr. Ehingcr first 
called upon Master Norman Grubb to 
lead the clasj, accompanied by music, in 
an exercise which he described. The 
confidence with which this little fellow 
came forward r.nd the readiness with 
which he performed this task before a 
large audience was proof that such train- 
ing is of much value. Little Elvira 
Johnson, daughter of Steward Johnson, 
was next called upon and the manner in 
which this diminutive tot played teacher 
quite won the hearts of the audience. 

The children made way for the junior 
young men who presented a handsome 
and soldierly appearance as they filed into 
the room clad in their bright uniforms of 
blue aud gray, with " '97" ou their shirt 
front in pink. 

The first part of their number consisted 
of marching evolutions which were per- 
formed with a military exactness that 
would have dene credit to West Point ca- 
dets. 

The dumbell drill which followed was 
composed of new and difficult movements 
originated lor this occasion. None of the 
exercises having been seen in the Normal 
gymnasium before. 



The senior young men gave a fine ex- 
hibition of club swinging, and amply sus- 
tained the reputation which this school 
has for developing these graceful exer- 
cises, for in liardly any other school in 
the country can such a variety of club 
movements be seen in regular class work. 
The senior class also gave a drill in bar 
bell exercises, displaying some wonder- 
fully intricate and beautiful movements 
which were also designed especially for 
the occasion. 

The handsome uniform of the Senior 
young men added greatly to the effective- 
ness of the work. It consisted of white 
duck trousers, with' blue stripe down 
the side, blue shirts and white belts. 

A combination of bar bell and dumb- 
bell exercises was shown by the young 
men of the Senior and Junior classes, 
which displayed some very artistic and 
effective developing exercises. 

The exhibition of foil fencing by Dr. 
Ehiuger's able assistant, Mr. Carl Shrader, 
aud Mr. Gtorge May, of Philadelphia, 
was a feature which has not been given 
before at these entertainments. Both 
these gentlemen exhibited great skill in 
the manipulation of the foils, an ad- 
times the thrusts and parries followed 
each other in such quick succession that 
the uninitiated could hardly see what 

had happened. 

The second part of the program, con- 
sisting of the heavier work upon appara- 
tus, was' opened by vaulting exercises ou 
two horses, led respectively by Dr. 
Ehinger and Mr. Shrader, the two sec- 
tions working from opposite sides of the 
apparatus, though performing simultane- 
ously the same movements. 

The class in flying rings was led by 
Mr. George Ward, and showed some of 
the most difficult exercises of the even- 
ing, culminating with the difficult and 
thrilling cut-off and fly-away exercises by 
Mr. Ward, which made the audience 
hold its breath, lest he land iu its midst 
as. ho sailed through the air on his aerial 
flight 



In the bout with broad swords by Mr, 
Shrader and Mr. May, the audience was 
treated to an entirely different style of ma- 
nipulation, as in the place of the thrusts 
of the foils, the attack is always made 
with a striking movement that leads the 
on-lookers to believe it a more difficult 
and vigorous, if not quite so graceful an 
exercise, as tbe foil work. 

The special class in club swinging, 
composed of Messrs.Greenwood,Halhnan, 
Hart, Wendel,Lapp and Jones, performed 
a difficult series of fancy movements, such 
as only advanced students ever master. 
No form of light exercise in the gymna- 
sium is more popular in exhibition, or so 
attractive to the performer, as club swing- 
ing to music. The graceful curves and 
and circles executed to the strains of a 
beaulilul waltz, impart a charm alike to 
the beholder and the performer. The 
young men of the class proved themselves 
adepLs in the art, and won much praise 
for their creditable display. 

A class of fourteen young men per- 
formed some fine exercises on the parallel 
bars, working from opposite ends and in 
pairs. The skill shown upon this appa- 
ratus was perhaps the most appreciated 
of the evening. Two beautiful pyramids 
were built upon the parallels in which 
the whole class tool; part. 

The entertainment closed with a con- 
test in spriug-board jumping, acrobatic 
work and the building of pyramids. 

Dr. Ehinger derived much valuable as- 
sistance from the hearty co-operation and 
able support given him by the assistant 
gymnastic instructor, Mr. Carl Shrader, 
who, in addition to being an accomplish- 
ed gymnast, is an able instructor and 
thorough student of gymnastic methods. 
His finished gymnastic work during the 
evening elicited much favorable comment 
and won for him new admirers. 

Both Dr. Ehinger and his assistant 
were recipients of handsome bouquets. 



48 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




a ., ranra&ii 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

AEST ~l N '..V,AL 5i : . 

WEST CHESTER, ??. 



o 31 



O 



G^nasfic jn 



ntertaioroent 



at 



Normal Gymnasium, 



FRIDAY 

even in; 



EEE'V 21 
1836. 

T.30 O'C LOC K. 



U "1 B 



PART !. 

i. Dumb Bells Class of 36 Young Ladies. - 

2. Pole Exercises, 

Members of ir A.M. and r .45 P. M. Classes. [ 
Lc<l l>y Miss Hughes. 

3. Combination of Dumb Bells and Poles. • ■;■;•» 

4. Marching and Free Gymnastics. 

4.8 You7ig Ladies of the funior Class.- 

5. Club Swinging. 24 Young Ladies of the Senior Class. 

t ■■■-.'• * .■- 

PART 11. " .; ^ 

".-■ 

1. Heavy Work — Parallel Bars . Class of 12 Young Ladies. .._.;; 

2. Fi'.ncy Steps Class of 24 Young Ladies. ]■ 

3. Club Swinging Sara Darlington.**'. 

4. Rings j6 Young Ladies of lite Junior. C'ass^.y 

5. Garland Carnival. . 40 Youug Ladies of Ike Senfor Class.'^j 

.''\'~* 
■ 

Accompanists— Mrs. Ehinger, Miss Mary Taylor, Miss Blanche Gen try," 
Miss Margaret Griffith, Miss Annie Goeppart 




I \N \M. i.M'l l\l 



limn M'i'ii 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 49 



FAIR GYMNASTS. 

Normal School Girls More Attractive 
Than Ever Last Evening. 



22 FEBRUARY 1896 



ADMIRED BY A CROWDED HOUSE. 



With Garlands, Dumb Bells, Clubs and 
Poles the Girls Showed That Physical 
Training Had Done Wonders for 
Them— Spectators Present From Long 
Distances Were Greatly Pleased With 
the Fine Exhibition— Presents tor the 
Popular Instructress. 



Graceful 





;irls to the number of two 
hundred or more 
Took part in the an- 
nual exhibition given 
by the voting ladies 
at the State Normal 
School last evening, 
and every one was a 
star. On account ot 
the close application 
which they had 
made during- the 
course of prepara- 
tion, and their quick 
sense of time and 
figure, all proved excellent, and at the 
close scarcely enough words could be 
found to express the praise which ad- 
miring friends heaped upon the ialr per- 
formers. 

Special credit was given to the instruc- 
tress of the girls' 
classes, Mrs. Dr. 
Ehinger, who, in com- 
pany with her hus- 
band, Dr. Ehinger, 
acting as general 
business manager, had 
planned the whole en- 
tertainment. That th.? 
pupils appreciated her 
work was shown by 
three handsome pres- 
ents which she receiv- 
ed during the evening. 

From the Seniors she has a beautiful 
lamp, which will be kept in memory of 
the graduating clas?: by the Juniors a 
splendid bouquet of flowers was sent her 
during an intermission in the perform- 
ance, and some of the other classes com- 
bined to give her a large silver ladle, 
which she will find most useful in her 
housekeeping on Normal avenue. 
HER VALUED ASSISTANTS. 
In much of the work of tie- evening, 
Mrs. Ehinger was assisted by Miss Anna 
R. Hughes, of Manoa, Delaware county, 
who was graduated from the Normal 
two years ago and has since taken a 
special course In gymnastics, under Dr. 
Anderson at New Haven. Dr. Ehinger 
and his helper, Carl Shrader. assisted in 
the heavy work, and the accompanists, 
who played the marches on the piano. 
were Misses Mary Taylor. Blanche Gen- 
try. Margaret Griffith, Annie Geoppart 
and Margaret Taylor. 

SPECIAL FEATURES. 
The distinctive feature of the entertain- 
ment, one which will long remain in the 
memory of those who were present, was 
the Garland Carnival, in which forty 
seniors took part. They were clad in 
empire gowns of white and blue.and wore 
their hair plainly bound with bands of 
white ribbon, with faces and hair ap- 
propriately powdered. Each young lady 
carried a garland made from a flexible 
wand six feet long covered with green 
and adorned with red and white roses 
and gilt cord. Holding these garlands 
above their heads, like so many beautiful 
arches, the fair performers formed a suc- 
cession of difficult figures, as star, cir- 
cles, crosses, hollow squares and finally 
dissolving into a solid mass of waving 
branches. The picture was exquisite. 



MISS DARLINGTON'S PART. 
Miss Sara Darlington, of East Wash- 
ington street, appeared on the floor alone 
and wearing a gown of black, with one 
of the fashionable sweaters which allow 
much freedom of movement. She gave 
.a fine exhibition of Indian club swing- 
ing'. Such movements as the coffee mill. 
the half snake, the windmill and differ- 
ent combinations which are anything but 
easy, were accomplished with greatest 
ease. 

HEAVY WORK. 
On the parallel bars and the flying 
rings, a class led by Miss Hughes, who 
was wonderfully graceful in all her ac- 
tions, performed many difficult feats. It 
consisted of Misses Emily Sinedley, 
Emily Hayes, Gertrude McKlnstry, Char- 
lotte Chapley. Laura Koons, Bertha Hair. 
Marie Yarnall. Cora Green, Ella Happer- 
sett. Anna Hughes, Jennie Roper, Mabel 
Patten. 

The balance of the programme con- 
sisted of dumb bell work, club swinging, 
pole exercises and fancy steps, all well 
executed. While these were much appre- 
ciated there was little demonstration on 
the pan of the audience, which contained 
many of the parents and friends of the 
young ladies, and a number of profes- 
sional Instructors who had come from 
distant parts to witness the exhibition. 
Little yelling among the students was 
heard, for, to the relief of the audience, 
every class nail been cautioned against 
making any noise, and the result was al- 
most perfect quietude on the part of the 
students. 

Following are the lists of the principal 
participants: 

FANCY STEPS. 
Claire Gibson, Miss Smedley. 

Gertrude Baker. Madge Johnson, 
Alice Shapley, Ida Burd, 

May Pownall. Emille Hayes, 

Gert'de McKlnstry, Laura Koons, 
Emma Hoopes, Naomi Sheneman, 

Charlotte Shapley, Florence Talley, 
Emma Baker, Helen Stewart, 

Mary Taylor, Miss Roberts. 

Mary Isett, 
DUMB BELLS. 
Fannie Rile, Lamont Houston, 

Lizzie Roberts, Bessie Bauer, 

Lvdia Mathias, Gertrude Baker, 

Alice Shapley, Claire Gibson, 

Mary Taylor. Gert'de McKinstry, 

Helen Scudder. Carrie Heaton. 

Martha Ewing, Florence Talley. 

Harriet Bunn, Naomi Sheneman, 

Sue Bvler, Helen Stewart, 

May Dungan, Emma Hoopes, 

Ella Wismer, Jessie Wherry, 

May Byers, Abbie Heald. 

Ada Shaw. Blanche Grubb, 

Delia Jones, Miss Turner. 

Laura Yocum, Charlotte Shapley. 

GARLAND CARNIVAL. 
Anna Anderson. Sallie Ingram, 
Margaretta Baker, Hannah Johnson, 
Ethel Bevan, Clara Keighley, 

Anna Brown, Laura Keighley, 

Lvdie Butler, Frances Knapp, 

Edith Byerts, Bessie Mattern, 

Emma Clark. lva Mearns. 

Emma Comley, Lottie Powell. 

Ada Crisweil, Lueile Preston, 

Mav Finlay. Jennie Roper, 

Bertha Forsythe, Tessie Shearer. 
Bessie Godfrey, Jos'ne Widdicombe. 

Anna Green. Mabel Wilson. 

Cora Green, Antoinette Wintzer, 

Julia Gyger. Mabel Woodward, 

Elsie Hambleton, Georgie Yeakel, 
Olive Hibbs. Ella Kulp. 

Cilia Hiddleson, Bertha Mcllhaney, 

Daisy Houck. Frances Mack. 

Mary Ingram. Mary Baker. 

CLUB SWINGING. 
Daisy Houck. Emily Smedley. 

Bessie Matt"rn. Eertha Forsythe. 

Bertha McElljaney, Elsie Hambleton, 
Mabel Wo. .i ' iid, Emma Comley, 
Laura Keiglney, Emily Worstal, 
Clara Keighley, Mary Ingram. 
Frances Knapp, Sallie Ingram, 

Lottie Powell. Anna Green, 

Frances Mack, Anna Leatherman. 

Georgie Yeakel. Martha Jones. 

Edith Byerts, Lucilla Preston, 

lva Meams. Ada Crisweil. 

Cora Green, Tessie Shearer, 

Nellie Robertson, Cilia Hiddleson. 

Among those In attendance were the 
following: 



ALUMNI PRESENT. 
'74— Anna P. Esler. West Chester. 
■75— Lydia A. Martin. West Chester. 
•77— Elizabeth P. Criley, Susan E. 
Lodge. West Chester, 
'si— Addison L. Jones, West Chester. 
■S3— Francis H. Gheen, Sara S. Kirk, 
West Chester. 

'S3— Dr. Andrew Thomas Smith. West 
Chester. 

'SS— Anna M. Goshen. Lafayette Hill; 
Dr. Meta T. Haley, West Chester. 

■S»— Alice Darlington. Helen II. Ely, 
Linda K. Hoopes. West Chester. 

■yo— Robert Anderson, William S. Delp, 
Dr. Daniel G. Snyder. 

"M — Tacie C. Embree, Marshallton; 
Estalena IT. Mercer. Allena M. OgUen. 
West Chester: Charles C. Roberts. Ken- 
nctt Square: Mary Rorer, Tenkintown. 

'9i: — Anna B, Windle, Bessie Channel], 
West Chester; Estella Daniels, Mo.lena; 
Mattie Johnson, Elain: Mary Fetters, 
Glen-Loch; Sherman S. Barr, Jenkin- 
town. 

'S3— Mrs. C. Anna Adams, West Ches- 
ter: Alice B. Cam, Fort Washington; 
James S. Heberling, Jessie R. Keech. 
West Chester: Katharine E. Murphy, 
Uovlastuwn: Louis* Stradlinz. Florence 
Windle, West Chester: Charles S. Wood" 
ward. Longwood; Virginia Worstafi, 
Chalfont. 

'M — Adele Baily. Corinne; Irwin K. 
Bauer, West Chester; Emmarene Bull- 
ock, Corinne: Ella C. Darlington. Henry 
F. Darlington. West Chester; Anna ( '_ 
Frederick. East Coventry: Anna K. 
Hughes, Marion: Florence Knapp, Elwyn; 
Carrie Moore, Miltord Mills; Anna It- 
Morgan, Fairview Village: Elizabeth 
Suplee, Coatesville: Catharine Wildman. 
Esther Wildman, Langhorne; Esther J. 
Wynn, West Chester. 

'•Jo— Martha Blair, Villa Nova; Florence 
R. Brosus. Chatham: Anna ('. Chandler, 
Bethlehem; Unity Dannaker. King-of- 
Prussia; Evalina Darlington. Wist Ches- 
ter; Anna E. Fetters, Glen-Loch; Lda. 
M. Fronelield, Wayne: Mary E. Griffith, 
West Chester: Joseph M. Harlnian, Ches- 
ter Springs: Eugene M. lleilnian. Phila- 
delphia; Simon G. Iluber. Blooming Glen; 
Etta N. Lapp. Malvern: Maude V. Moses. 
Narberth; Mary A. Powell. Upper Lehigh; 
Warren D. Kenninger, Pennsbury: Carna 
A. Seibeil, Slatington; Alice Moore, Ches- 
ter: Jean B. Urner, Spring City; 

Smedley, Oxford. 

FORMER STUDENTS. 
Marv Brooks, Cedarville; Anna J. 
Alleback, Green Lane; Cecilia Black, 
Dublin: Bessie S. Evans. Elkton, Md.; 
Annie Kline, Kenilworth: Gertrude Lan- 
caster. Village Green: Eva J. LaFever. 
Philadelphia: Elizabeth M. Powell. Upper 
Lehigh: Abby C. Ronall. Upland: Samuel 
Greenwood. Coatesville: John B. Holt- 
man, Fairview Village: Fred. E. Moore. 
Coatesville: .Morgan Thomas, Quiney; 
Thomas. Norristown: Helen O'Connell, 
Wilmington: Marion Fox.l I ummelstowi.: 
Lou Williams. Gilberton: George I'inley. 
George l.ayton, Mrs. Stockton. Kdinund 
Mays, Misses Shapley. Philadelphia;, 
Percival Sharphss. Ethel Drennaii. 
Ward; Cidnev Brinton, Chester Height-.; 
Bella Reid. Parkesuurg: Rev. William. 
Patton, Wavne; I ir. W. C. Baker, Hum- 
melstown; Mrs. William When... Chat- 
ham: Mrs. Calvin Criswi II. Cochranville; 
Bessie Richards. Touglikenamon. 




Harry Johnson 

Banjo Player in 

Gym Shows 



50 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 

"AMULET" MARCH 1896 



Gymnastic Exhibition. With Miss Annie Goeppart at the looked admiringly down, and eathusiasti- 

"Tliis is the prettiest entertainment piano, the movements were carried oily applauded them. The carriage of 

the girls have ever given," was the uui- through with a vigor that was pleasant to t h e young ladies was fine, and with foot 

versal comment of the large audience as see, the more so because the faces of the extended in true German style, they 

t dispersed after witnessing the fourth girls plainly showed the pleasure they formed their two companies and executed 

annual gymnastic exhibition by the were deriving from the work. In all the a complicated military drill in a manner 

young ladies of the Normal School, on movements where the bells were brought which evinced their hearty interest in the 

he evening of Friday, February 21 sL to the chest, one important point was work, and the most indifferent observer 

The weather, which had been severely noticeable, namely, that the bells were CO uld not but see the great value of this 

cold and stormy, had moderated, and the held well back toward the shoulders, fonn of exercise in the cultivation of a 

large gymnasium, with its many seats, its thus expanding the chest and giving the f ree , elastic, rhyrnic step, and erect car- 

briiliant electric lights, aud decorations shoulders a good carriage. riage. 

of flags, was warm, bright and attractive When this class had completed its work, Having competed their military man- 
to the hundreds of guests who had come, six long wooden poles were placed upon euvres they separated into files and exe- 
many of them, a number of miles to see the fluor in proper position, and another cuted what, in gymnastic phraseology is 
what was being done in the line of physi- class of twenty-two young ladies entered known as a "Swedish Day's Order," in 
cal education for die young people placed and to the strains of a lively march played ot i, er WO rds a series especially planned 
under the protecting roof of the Normal by Mrs. Ehinger, passed down in sections f or j ts physiological effects. The Swedes, 
School. and filed in between the poles. At a a^ a people, are warm advocates of pkysi- 

Besides parents and friends of the rignal the poles were quickly raised from ca j training, and they have evolved a 
young ladies a number of directors of the floor. The work of this class was system which, in some respects, has not, 
gymnasiums from other places were in led by Miss Annie R. Hughes, of Ard- at present, a superior. They work en- 
attendance, more, Pa., class oi '94, and a graduate, t i re i y without music, and each movement 

One of the happiest features of the oc- also, of the Anderson Normal School of kas jtg own command, 
casion was the very large gathering of Gymnastics, who had been assisting Mrs. The club swinging by twenty fcur 
former students, returned to enjoy again, Ehinger in the preparations for the ex- members of the Senior class, whicb foi- 
if only as spectators, the pleasures of the hibilion. Miss Hughes demonstrated lowed, was a surprise to ina«y, f<w the 
gymnasium, and to see once more the from the begiuning her fitness for the complicated circles, such a> 'follows '' 
pleasant faces of the Normal Faculty, profession she has chosen. Her leading and "snake-reeis" are not often attempted 
whose attendance that evening added so was fine, and the young ladies before her in large classes. But the young ladies 
greatly to the happiness of all the worked with an exactness which only have been learning to appreciate the 
students. those can appreciate who know the dim- great value of this fascinating phase of 

The number taking part in the even-culty of working with a piece of appara- work, and have taken much interest in 
ing^s exercises was larger than at anytuswhena number must do the move- their own progress. They have <aov»need 
previous entertainment, there being over ment in exactly the same way or produce further than any previous clas-s. The work 
one hundred and sixty on the floor dur- a conflict. was smooth and graceful, and the pretry 

ing the evening. Both the Senior and At the close of the pole exercises the combinations cailed forth »*nercus ap- 
Junior classes were more largely repre- two outer sections separated, and the two plause. The accompanist for this work 
sented than ever before, and the grade of intervening spaces were quickly filled by was Miss Margaret Griffith^ member of 
work by these two classes was higher a part of the previous ciass, who returned the Senior class. 

than has been heretofore attempted- with their dumbbells. Each class repeated Part second of the program was opened 

The first number ou the program con- its own series, which had been arranged by a class of twelve, led by M :>s Hughes 
sisted of a series of exercises with dumb- with a view to harmonious combination, and Miss Emily Smedley, who illustrated 
bells by a class of thirty-six young ladies, The effect was striking and beautiful, and in excellent form the kind of heavy work 
who enteied with firm, elastic step, and was heartily appreciated by the audience, the stronger young ladies oi the Normal 
quickly took their p'acc upon the floor. These classes now seated themselves, indulge in. This work >vas undei the 
The fresJi, young faces were made brighter and with Miss Margaret Taylor as accom- 
by the bunch of red carnations at the panist, forty-eight members of the Junior 
neck. class, led by Miss Mary Rickard and Miss 

Mary Wood, marched upon the floor, 
while the male members of the class 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 51 



supervision of Dr. Ehinger ami his 
assistant, Mr. Carl Schrader. Tin- move- 
ments, which were all of a ua.r.re to 
strengthen and not strr.in the lithe '-Klies, 
were taken with the utmost ease, stal the 
pleasure shown by the young isuma. in 
this torm of exercise proves is t >opi;l»rity. 
The final "pyramid" wasespeciaih pretty, 
and required considerable daring on the 
part oi some. 

A class of twenty-four young ladies 
now came upon the floor and executed a 
number of exceedingly preliy fancy steps 
in a graceful and taking manner. That 
this valuable phase of physical training 

is much appreciated by the audience, as 
well as 5>v the young ladies themselves, 
was manifest by the applause which fol- 
] owed their exit. 

The fancy club swinging by Miss Sara 
Darlington, with Miss Mary Taylor as 
accompanist, was a great surprise to those 
who had not seen her practice. One of 
the visiting gymnastic instructors said 
that this was the finest amateur club 
swinging she had ever seen. 

With Miss Margaret Taylor as accom- 
panist, the tnenibeis of the Junior class, 
who had appeared in the first part of the 
program, now returned with wooden 
rings covered with pink and silver, the 
class colors, .1Bd a bunch of pink carna- 
tions at the neck. This ring series, 



which was originated for the occasion, 
was very vigorous in its action through- 
out, and was in four parts. The first part 
was taken standing in single files, the 
the remaining parts in couples. In the 
second part both grasped one ring while 
the other was held behind the back. 
Part third was taken with both rings and 
hands crossed, and the fourth part facing 
partners. The exactness of the move- 
ments and the perfect rhythm displayed 
in this difficult series did great credit to 
the Juniors, and testified to the thorough- 
ness of their regular daily work. 

The last number of the program, the 
"Garland Carnival," by forty members of 
the Senior class, accompanied by Miss 
Blanche Gentrv, was the most elaborate 
arrangement of this kind of work ever 
put upon the floor of the Normal gymna- 
sium. The young ladies looked quite 
statuesque .a their graceful gowns and 
powdered hair. Their flexible garlands 
of green were profusely decorated with 
pink and white roses, manufactured for 
the occasion by the young ladies them- 
selves, and looking so natural that even 
the near observer would be tempted to 
sniff die perfume. These garlands formed 
an arch over the head of each, and fitting- 
ly framed the fresh young faces beneath 
them. As the young ladies entered the 



class colors were displayed in the dresses. 
The first ten wore white, the next twenty 
blue, and the last ten appeared in white. 
This arrangement was made with a 
view to artistic effect of the color in the 
combination figures which made up this 
beautifnl creation. The Garland Carni- 
val was originated for this event, and 
was memorized by the young ladies, so 
that the movements were taken bv signal 
only. The change were made so smooth- 
ly and rapidly as to be almost bewilder- 
ing. And once when the whole number 
seemed to be iu chaotic confusion the 
change evolved the finest figure of the 
whole, when five separate circles appeared 
covering almost the entire free floor 
space. These circles, after wheeling, 
changed into tableau form, and the lovely 
picture was held for several seconds. The 
last change came witli the winding of the 
line in snail circle till the whole number 
were massed in the centre of the room, 
waving their garlands in unison with the 
soft waitz music. 

At a signal the garlands were lowered 
aud the fair girls dispersed. 

The delighted audience rose, and as 
they took their leave many were the 
pleasant words and congratulations show- 
ered upon Mrs. Ehinger and the young 
ladies. 




13 March 1899— Men and Women's Show 



52 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



AMULET" MARCH 1897 



Gymnastic and Athletic Notes. 

On February urh the junior young 
ladies gave a drill in the gymnasium for 
the young men of the class, in return for 
a similar courtesy extended to them by the 
young men last month. The drill was 
greatly enjoyed by the young men and 
they showed their appreciation by frequent 
applause and rousing class cheers. 

There will be in connection with our 
gymnasium this spring a gymrasium team, 
which will have contests in all lines of gym- 
nastic work. They will try to have exhi- 
bitions mainly for Normal students. The 
candidates must pass an examination 
under Dr. Ehinger and Mr. Shrader. The 
candidates at the present time are Hon- 
berger, Brough, C. Jones, W. T. W. Jones. 
Singles, Derr and probably Yost and 
Kurtz, others will be admitted if they are 
able to pass the examination. The exami- 
nation will consist of several exercises on 
horizontal and parallel liars and horses. 



rings, etc. and besides this each one must 
pass a satisfactory physical examination. 
Dr. Ehinger and Mr. Shrader are the 
originators of this movement and it is 
thought it will be a big thing for our 
school. 

Great interest is manifested by the boys 
in gymnastics this year and it is expected 
to be a fine development for the field sports. 

The gymnastic exnibitions, which were 
omitted last year on account of the prac- 
tice rec^iiring too much time from the 
students' other studies, will be given this 
year, at the urgent request of Dr. Philip-, 
and the students themselves, heir, while 
some extra lime am' effort are necessary 
the results arc considered to fully Justin 
the outlay. 

The young men will give their exhibition 
some time in December, and the young 
ladies in the latter nan of Februarv. 







I I li 111 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 53 



Young Ladles' 
Gymnastic Entertainment. 




1 55B^" 



Gvmnasium 

of me 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 
Wesr Chester, l\i. 



rtkJay Even'ng, March 4, I5#>. 



^Rft CooPrR 5£UXA9l:TH KiRK roftR ^?Try 




GRIFFITH 



MAR G A tier 
Rogers 



/89f 



WOMEN'S GYM FASHIONS - 1898 



program -^^ 



Program-^^ 



MUSIC 



ARYAN ORCHESTRA 



MUSIC. 



ARYAN ORCHESTRA 



I. Marching, 



PART I. 

48 M EMBERS OF J U NIOR CLASS 



LED BY MISS NATHENA P. YOUNC, ASST INSTRUCTOR 



2. Practice Teaching -Illustrating the Daily Lesson 

LEADERS. MISSES HELEN FOULK E . CLAU Dl A WILBUR. 
ANNA HANNUM AND ELIZABETH KIRK 



3. Club Swinging, 36 M embers of Senior Class 

FANCY CLUBS. LED BY M/SS SARA DARLINGTON 

4. Heavy Work- Parallel Bars. 10 Young Ladies 

LED BY M/SS NATHENA P YOUNC. 

5. Fancy Steps ... - . ■ Forty Young Ladies 

LED BY MISSES H E LE N O'CON N E LL A N D E LI Z A B E T H C RU M BA L/C H . 



PART II. 

1. Ring Exercises, ■ ■ 40 M embers of J unior Class 

LED BY MISSES GIBSON AND MEARNS. 

2. Heavy Work— Horse. ... 10 Young Ladies 

LED BY MISS YOUNC. 

3. Wand Exercises, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 40 Young Ladies 

LED BY MISSES ANNA AND CHARLOTTE FLETCHER 



4. Aesthetic Gymnastics and Postures, 

20 M embers of Senior Class 

LED BY MISS ALICE PENNYPACKER. 



5. Frolic of the Fays. • 10 M emberSof Senior Class 

DRILLED AND LED BY MISS NATHENA P YOUNC 



MUSIC, 



ARYAN ORCHESTRA 



54 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



iDepartment of ipbgstcal Education, 

West Chester State Normal School, 
West Chester, Pa. 



<k\ 



Gymnastic 
Entertainment 



NORMAL GYMNASIUM, 

Friday Evening, Dec. 17, 1897, 

AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 
Proceeds for benefit of Athletic Association. 



program 



^ 



Music, 



Aryan Orchestra 



part H. 



1. 'Marching, Young Men of Junior Class 

2. Club Swinging, Young Men of Senior Class 

3. Class Exercises on Long Vaulting Horse, 

Young Men of Senior and Junior Classes 

4. Dumb Bells, Young Men of Junior Class 

5. Contest in Window Jumping. 

Music, • ■ . • • Aryan Orchestra 

IPart HI. 

1. Long Wands, . Young Men of Senior Class 

2. Exercises on Parallel Bars. 

3. Lantern Drill. 

4. Contest in Rope Climbing. 

5. Pyramids on Roman Ladder. 

Music, • • Aryan Orchestra 



The Aryan Orchestra, under the leader- 
ship of I. E. Stetler, opened the program 
and after a few selections gave way to the 
junior hoys who treated the spectators to 
an cxhihition of fancy marching. 

Then came on the seniors arrayed in 
their garnet shirts and gray trousers. 
Their cluh swinging was excellent and the 
applause given was loud and long con- 
tinued. The young men swung as' one 
man to the lively music furnished by Mrs. 
Ehinger. 

The long horse vaulting, by young men 
of both classes, was a very exciting and 
interesting number. As the orchestra 
played a lively two-step, Frank Hornber- 



ger cleared the horse in various manners. 
He was followed in close succession by 
Misses Esrey, Griffith, Lollenberger, 
Cram, Windlc, Yost. Shrope, Cane and H. 
Parsons. 

Again the class of '99 made its appear- 
ance, this time to give a drill in dumb-bell 
swinging. 

The contest in window jumping afforded 
much amusement. The window consisted 
of two parallel strips supported by up- 
rights, the object of the contest being to 
jump through these parallels with them at 
as small a distance apart as possible. 
Two specials, Mr. Bishop, and Mr. Mc- 
Kenzie carried off the honors, each jump- 
ing between the bars when they were only 
one foot and four inches apart. 

The senior boys opened Part II of the 
program by a most graceful and pretty 
drill with the long wands. 

Before they filed out. they made the 
walls of the gymnasium shake with their 
deafening class yell. 

The parallel bars were now quicklv 
brought forth and an exhibition on them 
way given by the gym team, after which 
came the feature of the evening, the lan- 
tern drill. 

Sixteen seniors took part in it, each car- 
rying a colored lantern, either yellow, red, 
orange or blue. Then with the electric 
lights turned off the boys formed squares, 
angles, circles and stars, producing many 
beautiful effects by combining the colors. 
Miss Horstick furnished the music to 
which the lantern bearers marched. The 
participants in this drill were: Messrs. 
Philips, Seipt, Martin, Hornberger, Sin- 
gles, Green, F. Pat sons, Wilson, Yost. 
Wiley, Miller, Stover, Lyons, Fowler, 
Kratz and Anders. 

The entertainment closed with pyramids 
preformed on Roman ladders. Twenty 
boys participated in this feature and many 
were the feats of skill and strength per- 
formed, while the young ladies in the gal- 
lery held their breath lest some harm 
should come to the young men. Those 
who took part in the pyramid work were: 
Messrs. Singles, Hornberger, Burke, 
Griffith, F. Parsons, H. Parsons. Esrev. 
Keliy. Mease, Windle, Yost, Seipt, Shrope, 
Lollenberger, Miller and Anders. 

As the spectators passed out the orches- 
tra pisjed and helped impress on their 
minds the remembrance of the prettiest ex- 
hibition ever given in the gymnasium, 
thanks to the unceasing efforts of Dr. 
Ehinger and Mr. Sciiradcr. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 55 



Gymnastic and Htfotctk JSotea. 

The Girls' Gymnastic Exhibition comes 
on March 4th, Friday evening, 7.30 P. M. 
Go early and get a good seat. 

It can be confidently stated that the 
girU' exhibition, will be something excep- 
tionally fine this year. Extensive prepa- 
rations are being made and all who are to 
participate are doing extra practice. The 
class work is .more difficult than generally 
attempted while the fancy steps and fay 
dance is something .superb. 

"AMULET" MARCH 1898 

Tlii- prettiest gymnastic entertainment 

ever given by the young ladies of this 
school, took place in our gymnasium on 
Friday evening. March 4th. 

Though the weather was most unfavor 
able the house >vas packed, which faci 
paused the boys to wonder v\h\ the rain 
hail prevented the people from coming to 
their entertainment. 

llie Aryan ( )rcliestra opened the pro- 
gram li\ a lively march. They had scarcely 
finished playing when forty-eight |unior 
girls led by Miss Xathena P. Voting, their 
instructor, filed into the room for an exer- 
cise in marching. They were dressed in 
new costumes which were admired l>\ 
everyone. 

I he next number illustra'od the daily 
work of the Senior girls The class w;>- 
divided into four sections which were led 
by Misses Helen Eoulke. Anna llanimm. 
Elizabeth Kirk and Claudia Wilbur. 

Xext in order was club swinging by 
thirty-six Seniors, with Miss Sara Darling 
ton a.s leader. This feature was well re- 
ceived. The Senior boys blushed with 
shame when they saw the girls swinging 
clubs better than they ever expected to 
swing them. 

I he heav\ work was an amusing feature. 
It seemed rather unusual to see the girls 
doing the same feats that the boys have al- 
ways thought that they alone could do. 

The fancy steps led by Misses Helen 
O'Conncll and Elizabeth Cnimbaugh came 
in for a liberal share of applause. This was 
a pretty exhibition of grace and skill. 

Misses Gibson and Mearns led the 
Junior girls in an exercise with the rings. 

Everybody seemed delighted with the 
graceful way in which forty young ladies 
executed the wand drill. 



The spectators were held spell-bound by 
the Greek postures of the Senior girls 
This was no doubt the leading feature of 
the evening. The young ladies, twenty in 
number, were arranged in white llowing 
gowns with "Walls of Troy" borders, 
which together with the novel \va> in 
which the) had arranged their hair, gave 
them a very picturesque appearance. The 
ease and grace that they displayed in many 
of their postures such as Rejection and In- 
vitation showed that they had been in like 
positions before. 

The closing number Frolic of the 
Fays" by ten Senior girls was a merry little 
slow dance during which they performed 
many graceful. movements ind ending, with 
a tableau. The partici]>ants were the fol- 
lowing: Misses Elizabeth Shiffert, Marie 
Akers, Claudia Wilbur. Luna Dixon, Helen 
McCoy, Helen Castle, Helen Foulkc, Iona 
Dysart, Belle Crawford. 

Mrs. Ehinger and Miss Xathena B. 
Young were warmly congratulated after 
the exhibition for the excellent showing 
made by those under their charge. Each 
received beautiful bouquets from both 
Seniors and Juniors. 

5 MARCH 1898 

GYMNASTIC GIRLS 

IN PRETTY POSES. 

1 Packel Hoitise ItoJ9y^ThW~ Exaltation 1 
"." .at the Normal. 



Many Vl«Itor»From a DtBtance— Feminine 

Grace ~ and Anility Win Plaudits 

From the Throng of Spectators. 

Bright Normal girls were more charm- 
ing than ever last night. Under the eyes 
of thtir Instructors, In the presence of a 
large audience, and supported by the 
whole Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 
they performed their parts in the gym- 
nastic - exhibition most admirably. 
The customary drills, which have c£ 
ways be^n excellent, were given -ado i 
attractiveness by many surprises in the 
way of costume and change in the rou- 
tine figures 

The first surprise occurred when about 
Half a hundred fair Juniors came out 
wearing oroad white collars, almost large 
enoug'h for capes, and bearing the mys- 
tic figures '"99," which mean that all 
look forward to the coveted diplomas at 
the end of the course. These finishing 
touches to the costumes were noticed 
especially and marked the Juniors all 
through the evening. At the throat every 
girl wore the class colors. They marched 
in perfect time. 

Following this surprise was a seoond. 
which in some ways was suggestive of 
a number of entertainments all going on 
it once. Four young women of the Se- 
nior class. Hisses Helen Foulke, Claudia 
Wilbur, Anna Hannum and Elizaoeth 
Kirk, acted as leaders. every one of these 
having a class of seven or eignt, and go- 
ing tu.'ougn a rtgular lesson. As t..e 
movements were nearly all different 
from one another, and the young in- 
structors talked all the while, the effect 
was accompanied by a spice of humor 
wnich the audience so.,n recognized. 



The club swinging by the Seniors, un- 
der the leadership of Miss Sara Darling- 
Ion, heavy work, with Miss Nathena P. 
Young, the assistant- teacher, as leader, 
and the fancy steps in which Miss H<aen 
O'Connell and Miss Elizabeth Krum- 
baugh took the initiative, were all per- 
fect exhibitions of grace, symmetry and 
skill. That the audience aprreciated this 
wa,s shown by the close attention, the fre- 
quent applause and the many expressions 
of praise. At times there were showers 
of blossoms which fell from the, galleries 
and were picked up by the fair per- 
formers. 

Miss Young, who gave the commands 
■of the evening in clear tones, sometimes 
stood on the main floor x>t the gym- 
nasium and sometimes at the middle of 
the.,;aisrd platform on which were the 
highest seats. Dr. C. E. Ehinger, who 
>s director of the gymnasium, acted as 
general rrianager of the entertainment, 
put took no part in the' performance. 
Mrs. Ehinger played the accompani- 
ments, and Carl Schradev assisted in a 
general way, being ready at all times 
•to prevent accidents in case any one 
Shoutd slip while performing heavy work 
or holding a place in the pyramids. 

The ushers and ticket takers were, 
these young men: Fred Parsons, Fred 
Wlndlei Lorln Bartmnn, Orin Miller. El- 
mer Carl,' Nelson Martin and Sharpless 
J>. Green. . 

'.^Muslc was furnished b-v the Arvan Or- 
ehesfra, which played delightfully at in- 
tervals during the programme. 

AS usual, tin* in-truc'.i.rs w/*re pivsent- 
< <1 with exquisite bmiffunts. Mrs. Ehinger 
was al.-\T given a iiamlsimte |wrlui stool. 

In pari sorontl (>.[ the programme 
twcTily .Senior;-, who were I,. I by Miss 
Alice Peuiiypiieki'r in aesilieiie gymnas- 
tics and p.i.-i arps.wi ■•.• ■ >:..■, itin^h grace- 
ful. Tlioy wiiii' Inn:; wliil • flowing robes 
r:f the Orviiuii |un.ni. with "Willi* of 
Troy" border.-. 1. nl ,i|i|i.aroii In ;i dozen 
. .:• men- ul tin- familial- I i.-l.-.n ;.• atli- 
tU'li-s, a I! in a highly i-i'-dltatilu manner 
v ial: ■!,. ..in, .1 riniixl afU'i- round of 

hiarlv anion:-. 

i '•' • ' FROLICSOME FAYS. 
FoU ring these and cleans the exer- 
cises oj the evening came the "Frolic of 
the FaW a merry little dance to slow 
time by ten of the Senior girls, who wore 
long loose short-walsted gowns of black 
with low neck and short sleeves and 
spangles at the breast. Led by Miss 
Young, they held the folds of their skirts 
in their extended hands and performed 
many graceful movements, at length 
ending in a tableau of black and white. 
Those who took part were as follows: 
Misses Belle Crawford. Elizabeth Shif- 
fert, Marae Akers, Claudia Wilbur, Luna 
Dixon, Heltn McCoy, Helen C3stle, Helen 
Foulke, Iona Dysart _ - 
CTass In practice teaching— Leaders, 
Helen Foulke, Claudia Wilbur. Anna 
Hannum, Elizabeth Kirk. Pupils. Cora 
Buchanan, Elizabeth Monks, Edna Bui- 
house, Harriet Bunn. Ida Stout, Ger- 
trude Baker, Lilian Owen, Rae Hippie, 
anna Sldwell, Lizzie Cox, Leta Fergu- 
son,. Mary Turner Annabel Skelton. Re- 
becca Liggett. Virginia Jamison, Flora 
Clrmer. Minnie Jones. Iona Dysart. Car- 
r Branson. Elizabeth Thompson. Marae 
Wingard, Alice Pennypacker, Eva Stite- 
ler, Gertrude Fairlamb, Luna Dixon, 
Helen McCoy, Katherine Bell, Emma 
Funk. Bessie Wolf. 

Jrniors— Bessie Palmer Mabel Marrett. 
Edna Stmmers. Mattie Forrest. Annie 
Carey, Mary Snyder, Lottie Scholl, Adele 
Taylor, Mabel Mparns, Mabel Marshall, 
Jessie Wherry, Edith Spare. Ethel Coop- 
er. Sadie Swope, Sara Wright, Mary 
Lindsay. Nellie Killeen, Emma Seipt. 
Ray Webster, Elizabeth Anderson. Claire 
Gibson, Dorcas Tucker, Margaretta 
Worrall, Irene Shoemaker, Katherine 
Ke-pner, El'zabeth Wilson, Irene Reagan, 
Sara Hoffman. Harriet . Rogers. Geneva 
Brown. Amy Craven, Jennie Case, Mar- 
garett Swayne, Florence Sehaefter, Mary 
Stewart, Sallle Batthager, May Byers, 
Sara Hamilton, Elizabeth Gray. Bertha 
Hoover, Sadie McHenry, Miriam Allen. 
Lilian Makiver. Lucina Williams, Mabel 
Boyce, Annie Hill, Minnie Bickel. Annie 
Gill, Irene Barnard. Jarewell Martin. 



56 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



^oint Qymnastic 
Exhibition 



Program .^^ 




By Y oun S Ladies 

and Y^ung )VIen. 

(.iimna>ium 

STATE NORM/ \L SCI KX)I. 

West Chester, IXi. 

Saturday Evening, 
March 11, 1899, 

At 7..v< o'cltwk. 

13 MARCH 1899 

BOYS AND GIRLS 

AS GYMNASTS. 

A Fine Exhibition at the Normal School on 
Saturday Night. 



PRETTY MOVEMENTS IN GOOD TIME. 



One of the Greatest Triumphs in the 
History of Physical Education in West 
Chester— A Fine Series of Evolutions 
and Difficult Feats— Different Classes 
Share the Honors of the Evening, 
While the Orchestra Plays Patriotic 
and Other Airs— Bouquets Presented 
to the Instructors- 



From Dally Local News, March 13. 
Saturday night's joint gymnastic 
exhibition at the West Chester State 
Normal School was attended hy one 
of the largest crowds In the 
history of physical training at the school. 
The programme was one of excellence, 
and was carried out In fine style. Those 
in charge were Dr. C. E. Ehinger, Physi- 
cal Director; Mrs. Ehinger. and their 
respective assistants, Carl G. Schrader 
and Miss Ada Cornwell. So great was 
the demand for seats and admission tha/ 
George 13. Fetters, who sold tickets, was 
directed to stop at about a quarter be- 
fore eight, the house being entirely filled. 



Ml SIC 



IP art 11 



i. Marching with Free Exercises. 

, i a. Ci.i h Swinging. i 

\f>. Marching and Postures, i 



Normal Orchestra 

4 s Young Ladies ut Junior Class 

. ■ Senior Young Men 

Miss Elsie Philips 



j. Ciik wn Flag Swinging, ... 

4. PRACTICE TEACHING— Illustrating the Daily Lesson. 

J4 Young LaJies of Senior Class 
;. BAR REM. DRII.l 24 Young Ladies of Preparatory Classes 

c>. Horizontal Rar Exercises. 



part 1I1F 



i a. Marching, 



Junior Young Men 



i b. Du,v\b Bell Drill, i 

2. VAULTING High Side Horse. 

3. FANCY STEPS- "Irish Lute," 8 Young Ladies 

4. RUCK EXERCISES— Height-dive Vaulting. 

5. EXERCISES WITH HOOPS 20 Young Ladies of Senior Class 

6. Gymnastic Carnival. 



The orchestra, under the leadership of 
Trying Stettler, played a number of good 
selections, never having been in better 
tune nor in a morn appreciative assem- 
bly. "With the uniformed and excited 
gymnasts on the main floor, the class 
banners flying, the large number of spec- 
tators tin reserved seals at the southern 
end of the building, and a perfect crush 
iu the gallery which extends about the 
four sides and forms the running track, 
the scene was one of the most animated 
and attractive which West Chester has 
ever beheld. 

JUNIORS COME FORWARD. 

The first ripple of applause, a forerun- 
ner of many such demonstrations which 
occurred during the evening, wus heard 
shortly before eight o'clock, when the 
long satin streamer of blue and silver, 
mounted on a staff a dozen feet in length, 
and bearing the signiiicant figures, "1900," 
was seen at the entrance, for the audi- 
ence knew by this that the Junior Class 
was coming. Forty-eight girls In white 
waists and blue sklrts.who followed their 
emblem, appeared in a pretty march 
which was varied by free gymnastics and 
the forming of many difficult figures. To 
the time of a march played by Miss Mary 
MaoElree.they kept perfect step and per- 
formed all their movements with grace 
and accuracy, under the direction of Mrs. 
C. E. Ehinger, who stood in a plain 
evening gown of black silk at one corner 
of the room and gave the words of com- 
mand. As a finale, the girls saluted the 
banner, held aloft by Miss Elsie Philips, 
u£ Atglsn, ana just as tney. were about 

to leave the floor, President William Ir- 
win, of the Senior Class, hurried across 
from the entrance with a huge bouquet, 
for the instructress. 

THEN THE SENIORS. 
Mrs. Ehinger, after receiving the bou- 
quet, passed it to a friend to hold, whila 
she turned to the piano to play a march 
for the Senior boys, who in grey outing 
shirts and blue pantaloons. car*3 forward 
for an exercise with clubs, which they 
swung at the word from Dr. Ehinger, 
wiLh many artistic curves and graceful 
evolutions. The gallery .which knew bet- 
ter than the house how difficult it is to 
handle the apparatus so rapidly without 
blunders, was generous In its applause, 
especially In the closing figures, which 



consisted of a series of tableaux repre- 
senting the attitudes of the gladiators in 
the arena. Before leaving the floor the 
boys collected near the entrance and 
gave their yell, which ends with the tri- 
umphant "All hail '99." 

CLUBS AND FLAGS. 

Miss Elsie Philips, a member of one 
of the recent graduating classes, gave 
an exhibition of fancy movements in club 
swinging, twirling a pair of black clubs 
with much rapidity and ease. Miss Phil- 
ips wore a loose fitting gown of white, 
which allowed her much ease of move- 
ment. When she had finished swinging 
the clubs she was handed two large flags, 
which she handled with equal dexterity. 

"Practice Teaching" was the tasK as- 
signed to twenty-four young wdmen.' 
Four members of the class acted aa 
teachers, every one of them taking a 
small class and giving a lesson. While 
every one of these did just what would 
be done in any class room in gymnastics, 
the four classes looked odd when all were 
doing different work and all the teachers' 
were giving different directions. Such 
a diversion, while Instructive in Its way. 
was not lacking in humorous effect, and 
it proved a happy break in the pro- 
gramme. Those who taught the classes 
were Misses Mary Snyder, Mabel Mearns, 
Alice Crater and Annie Murray. 
WITH BAR BELLS. 

Wearing their regular gymnasium suits 
and carrying bar bells — long rods with 
knobs on the ends — a class of twenty- 
four preparatory girls gave a drill, under 
command of Miss Ada Cornwell. They 
handled their apparatus in fine form.pre- 
senting a number of new movements 
which were much admired. 

The first portion of the programme 
closed with a series of exercises on trt& 
horizontal bar, the class of young men 
being led by Dr. Ehinger and Mr. Schra- 
der, the latter being an expert in thla 
line of work. While the orchestra played, 
the performers one by one took their 
turns upon the bar, swinging, whirling 
and dropping in a bold and confident 
manner, but with no accident. One of 
the boys, Mr. Swope, who was suffering 
with a sore hand, met with some little 
difficulty In making the turns, but he 
showed good determination and was able 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 57 



to do well. The performers were, in ad- 
dition to the instructors: W. C. Cram, 
William Griffith, Ernest Halback, Nor- 
man Smith, W. D. Schrope. 
JUNIOR BOYS. 

Junior young men. in marching and 
dumb bel>- *rork, opened the second por- 
tion of the' programme, their banner be- 
ing suspended far above their heads, 
■while the Senior colors also were seen at 
the railing on one end of the gallery. 
The boys made letters, ovaln .oblongs and 
numerous other designs, showing careful 
training and strict attention to the work 
In hand. The Juniors gave their deaf- 
ening yell before departing. 

ON THE HORSE. 

On the vaulting horse a class of young 
men gave a fine series of movements, 
leaping over it In half a dozen different 
styles and creating much laughter by 
their grotesque positions. Those who 
took part In this work were the follow- 
ing: A. B. Arnold, H. B. West, Donald 
Davis, Samuel Sinclair.Gabriel Machado, 
Gull. Machado, Amos Auckle, William) 
Griffith, P. Schoonover, Elmer Lajiej 
Stauffer Kllnk, Jflhn Kin g, Charles jLaw. 
■ Eight graceful maldeTlsT In ^thelrTilouses 
and divided skirts, gave a series of fancy 
steps which were dainty as could be and 
proved one of the most taking features 
of the night. While a sprightly air, in 
Imitation of the Irish lute, and sounding 
like the old familiar "Whistle and I Will 
Come to Tou, My Lad," was played ra- 
pidly on the piano, the girls, holding 
one another's hands, delighted the great 
audience with their pretty movements. 
The misses were Delia Taylor, Mary 
Bair, Anna Fletcher, Marie Steel, Mary 
Horstlck, Elsie Longshore, Mary Mac- 
Elree and Hannah Esrey. 

ON THE BUCK. 

Then came buck exercises In high dive 
vaulting, the boys In the next class leap- 
ing over a light bar, alighting with their 
hands upon the buck, and going over it 
before touching the floor. When the bar 
was about six feet high the boys went 
over It with much ease and readiness. 
This Is called the high dive, from Its bold 
plunge In mid air. The young men were 
W. C. Cram, Rudolph Pratt, Norman 
Smith, Samuel Sinclair, William Griffith, 
Alton Kreibel, Ernest Halback, A. B. 
Arnold. 

HOOP DRILL. 

The final class exercise was a hoop drill 
by twenty senior girls in white gowns 
and garnet sashes, their hoops being 
nearly as tall as themselves and easy to 
walk through while the hoop stood on the 
floor and the girl stooped to pass. The 
variety afforded In this was charming, es- 
pecially when the girls would use the 
hoops as skipping ropes, or in making" 
pyramids of beauty as they assembled la 
groups. The girls were: Misses Lucie 
March, Clair Gibson. Margaret Swayne, 
Bessie Ruth, Mary Snyder, Eurie Bash, 
Marian Eachus, Jessie Wherry, Ethel 
Cooper. Sadie Swope. Minnie Blckel. 
Mabel Mearns, Delia Taylor, Sue Byler. 
Sarah Hoffman. Annie R. and Jennie 
Wlckersham, Bessie Hellings, Edith 
Spare, Bessie Palmer. 

CLOSING CARjpVAL. 

The programme of the evening closed 
with a grarM carnival. In which a num- 
ber of the 1 young men took part, all the 
apparatus in the gymnasium being kept 
in motion at the same time. Running, 
jumping, swinging, parallel bar work and 
the like were enough to bewilder one. 
After a'few moments of this a whistle 
was blown and the boys rushed together 
to form a splendid pyramid with which 
the climax was reached. The partici- 
pants in the carnival were as follows: 

Messrs. Cram, Griffith, Halback, 
Mackie, Schrope. Lane, Prlzer, Irvln, 
Gull, Machado. Gabriel Machado. Law, 
King. Weinberger, Smith, McElrey, Mc- 
Cracken, Sinclair, West. Rigley, Kllnk, 
Schoonover, Davis, McCreary, Strauss, 
Sanderson. Pratt, Arnold, Green, Jones, 
Klntzer. Horstlck. Jenks, Pelrce, Web- 
ster, Wiand, Kriebel. 

THOSE WHO ASSISTED. 
Tickets during the evening were taken 
by Harry S. Johnson, George L. Hoff- 
man, Charles C. Roberts, and the ushers 



were Isaac Roberts. Mr. Schrelner 
Homer Darlington, Mr. Schoonover and 
others. 

Bouquets were presented to a number 
of those who had taken leading parts 
In the management. The orchestra, of 
which C. Irving Stettler was leader, and 
Miss Larrabee was pianist, received a 
handsome floral remembrance from the 
gymnasium faculty. The junior young 
ladles presented bouquets to Mrs. Ehln- 
ger and Miss Cornwell. The Junior young 
men gave flowers to Dr. and Mrs. Ehln- 
ger and Mr. Schrader. A large and hand- 
some plant was given to Mrs. Ehlnger 
by the Senior Class. 

SOME OF THE VISITORS. 

Among the visitors of the evening were 
the following: Miss Maude Hopkins. 
Physical Director of Drexel Institute: 
Dr. Smith, Physical Director of Bryn 
Mawr College: Professor Houghton and 
Miss Hutchinson. Physical Directors at 
Swarthmore College: Dr. Grace Spiegel 
and Miss Blake. Phvslcal Directors at 
the Girls' Normal School. Philadelphia: 
Dr. Ida V. Rell, Coatesville: Professor 
Wlngart, Physical Director of the West 
Branch of Philadelphia Toung Men's 
Christian Association: Egbert Carey and 
wife and Felicia Thomas, of Westtown 
Boarding School. 

GYMNASIUM NIGHT 

AT THE NORMAL 

The Building Crowded 1o' Its ^tradst 
Working Capacity. 



VERY CREDITABLE EXHIBITION 



Y'outh, Streucth, Grace and Skill Be- 
fore a Hiifrc Audience for Three En- 
joyable Hours— Much in the Enter- 
tainment Worthy of Commondat Ion 
—Club Swinging, Mnrclilnjr, Bells, 
Bar Work, Vaulting;, Hoop Drill. 



Long- before the hour set for the com- 
mencement of the gymnastic exhibition 
at the Normal on Saturday night every 
seat was filled and rows three and four 
deep had formed all around the floor 
and the running track. The entire 
gymnasium was bright with ribbons 
and gay costumes and young faces. 

After a pleasing overture by the Nor- 
mal orchestra, came marching with free 
exercises, by eighteen young ladies of 
the junior class. They drilled well and 
created a good impression. Many of 
the movements were much admired 

The senior young men who partici- 
pated in the club swinging and march- 
ing and postures were Albert J. Burke, 
Ralph F. Channell. William C. Cram. 
William Irvin, T. Ker.ney Forrest, Sam- 
uel Goodley, Clarence Gordon, William 
C. Griffith, Horace Haines, Ernest K. 
Halbach, James D. Heffner, Edward F. 
Kelly, Elmer Lane, Harry Mease, Wil- 
liam D. Schrope, James T. Shoffner, 
George L. Sollenberger. Irving' T. Stet- 
ler, Reuben B. Swope and E. B. Ulrich. 

It was a fine exhibition and was well 
rendered. 

The c;em of the evening was the club 
and flag swinging by Miss Elsie Philips. 
The clubs followed each other In grace- 
ful curves and circles in front, over- 
head, behind her back and at the side 
without a break and without an appar- 
ent effort, like the vanes of a windmill; 
and the flag swinging was equally effec. 
tive and pleasing. 

The four classes of senior girls who 
illustrated the dally lesson were led by 
Misses Alice Creter, Mabel Mearns, 
Margaret Ross and Mary K. Snyder. 
After preliminary marching as a body 
they broke up Into classes, and the 
instructions and various motions at the 
same time in different parts of the floor 
gave a. happy variety to the program*. 



Then followed a graceful drill by 
twenty-four young ladies of the pre- 
paratory classes, worthy of commenda- 
tion. The bar bells furnish opportunity 
for many graceful combination move- 
ments, and they were well utilized. 

The gymnastic team which performed 
on the horizontal bar was composed of 
William Cram, William Griffith, Reu- 
ben Schrope, Ernest Halbach. Mr. 
Smith, with Dr. Ehlnger and Carl 
Schrader. It is hard for one not an 
adept at this class of athletic work to 
realize the strength and skill required 
to carry Dff gracefully the \arlous ex- 
orcises, some of those, which seem- most 
daring and reckless being far easier 
than others less showy. The work was 
masterly, and the applause of the. au- 
dience was rightly awarded. 

After an interlude of music by the 
orchestra came a marching and dumb- 
bell drill by the following juniors: An- 
drew Arnold, William J. Baker. Sam- 
uel L. 1 Bower, Willard C. Brinton. Chas. 
Burkardt. William A. Cawley, Donald 
W. Davis, C. G. Keller. Reuben W. 
Klntzer, Louis G. McCauley, C. T. Mc- 
Creary, Randolph Pratt. Adam Reber, 
James Rosenberger. Raymond Rosen- 
berger, James G. Sigman. Norman D. 
Smith, Mr. Saxon, Percy Strauss, O. 
Nelson Weinberger. Parke J. Wilson, 
Ernest Windle and Mr. Schonover. The 
exercises with the bells were quite 
showy, and the marching in. phalanx 
was ideal, the heads rising, and falling 
to the step as if of one piece. There 
was a promptitude and precision abo-ut 
these young men that greatly pleased 
the audience. 

In vaulting the high side horse, Grif- 
fith. Lane, West, Sinclair.- Rutherford 
and Klink took part. This was am in- 
spiriting portion of the entertainment 
and well carried through. 

Eight young ladies then gave the 
fancy step to the "Irish Lute." These 
were Adela Taylor. Mary MacElree, 
Hannah Esrey, Mary Bair, Elsie Long- 
shore. Miss Horstick, the Misses Fletch- 
er. The dance was graceful and pleas- 
ing and in accurate time.; and was well 
received. 

Irl the heigtit dive over the buck 
William Cram finished first and the 
following in order: Griffith, Pratt, 
Smith, Halbach. Schrope, Sinclair. 

The hoop drill by members of the 
senior class, which concluded the set 
portiom of the entertainment, was a 
fitting close, and a thing of rare beauty. 
The hoops afforded endless opportunity 
for pleasing movements and postures, 
and the participants were applauded 
roundly at frequent intervals. It closed 
with tableau groups whose dainty grace 
could not be excelled. The girls who 
gave the exercise with hoops were Eu- 
rie Bash, Sue C. Byler, Ethel M. Cooper, 
Marian FS Eachus. Mattie Forrest, Sara 
E. Hoffman, Clara M. Gibson, Lucy B. 
March. Mabel E. Mearns. Bessie E. 
Ruth, Mary K. Snyder, Edith L Spare. 
Emma P. Stackhouse. Margaret B. 
Swayne, Adella. A- Taylor, Jessie E. 
Wherry. 

There followed a gymnastic carnival 
in which a number of appliances were 
on the floor at one time and classes at 
work on each, which gave a bird's-eye 
view aa it- Tf*re- of -genera* gymnasium 
work. 

The introduction of bodily exercises 
info regular school wj>rk is a marked 
advance over the methods of twenty 
years ago, and the benefits of syste- 
matic athletic training will last the 
students through life as well as enable 
them to preserve good health while at 
their books. All such exhibitions tend- 
ing to popularize these exercises should 
be warmly encouraged. 



58 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



26 FEBRUARY 1900 



Annual Gymnastic 

ENTERTAINMENT. 
Department of Physical Training. 

Gymnasium of the t ,m» 
West Chester State Normal School. 

Friday Evening, March 2 

Including Swedish Gymnastics; exer- 
cises with Indian Clubs, Dumb Bells, 
Wands and Poles. ■ 

Marching; Practice Teaching; Hori- 
zontal Bar Exercises;' Horse and Buck 
Vaulting with Pyramids. Aesthetic Gym- 
nastics. Postures and Pantomime. 
; Participated In by the Young Ladle; 
and Young Men of the School. 

Entertainment commences at . 7.30 
o'clock.' .. 

General admission 25 cents 

Reserved seats 35 cents 

rhurt at Ruoerfs Tuesday. 



Program-*^ 



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*i -T-'y^v- >~-- : ' r '~-' ~ £ - "T'V ■r^r^~<-" 



Joint Gymnastic Entertainment 



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♦♦State Normal School* 

Gymnasiurmg^ 



WEST CHESTER, PA. 



©®{9©®©©©S0£ -; : - 



.AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 



2 MARCH 1900 

FORMAL ATHLETES 

DO THEIR BEST. 

Last Wight's imbibition Wag the' i'irat 

the Gynasium Has Ever Seen* 

;i«n Work and Special Work Attracted 

Over One Thousand Spectators — Many 

Parent* There— Teachers From 

Other School*, 



part 11. 



MUSIC Normal Orch estra 

1. E XE RCISES WITH DUMB BELLS. WITH PRELIMINARY SWEDISH MOVEMENTS, 

YOUNG MEN OF JUNIOR CLASS 

2. Exercises with Poles CLASS OF 40 YOUNC LADIES 

3. Class Marching YOUNC MEN OF SENIOR CLASS 

4. Free Gymnastics. Practice Teach inc. 

LEADERS — M isses Bruton. Eyrich and Longacre; 

24 YOUNG LADIES OF SENIOR CLASS 

5. Exercises on Horizontal Bar ■ M E M BE RS OF CY M N AST IC TEAM 

part 11. 

MUSIC Normal Orchestra 

I Free Gymnastics. 

Simple Developi ng Work. I llustrati ng Part of Daily Lesson. 

36 MEMBERS OF 2.30 P. M CLASS 

2. Exercises with Wands ■ ■ ■ 16 YOUNG MEN OF JUNIOR CLASS 

' (7 1 E xe rcises for Balance and Control. 

24 Young Ladies of Junior Class 



'/•> Fancy Steps "Presto. 



4. Club Swinci no E xe rcises. preceded by Swedish movements. 

Young Men of Senior Class 



in A esth et ic Gym nast ics. i 

I 



28 Young Ladies of Senior Class 



5. >/• postures 
'• ' pantomim e 1 

VOCAl A COMPANIMENT, THE LOST CHORD OY JUNIOR CLASS 

6. combination exercises on vaulting h orse a n d buc k . 

Closing with pyram ids 





Dr. Ehlnger. Mrs. Dr. Ehlnger. 

Last evening the annual gymnastic en- 
tertainment was given at the State Nor- 
mal School. The audience was- the largest 
a tnd the programme the best ever seen in 
the gymnasium. Over one thousand spec- 
tators were present, including many pa- 
rents and friends of the students, and 
many teachers from other schools. 

Among the many teachers attending 
■were Miss Adams, of the Friends' Select 
School, Philadelphia; Miss Pertuck, of 
trto Philadelphia Turngemelnde; Ml*s 
Young, of the Girls' High School, in that 
city; Mrs. Brown, of the Boston Normal 
Bohool of Gymnastics, whose sister. Miss 
Bngle, Is a student here; Miss Dates and 
Miss Trowbridge, Bryn Mawr; Miss 
Coding. St. Mark's School, Philadelphia; 
Miss Felicia Thomas; Henry BartleU, 



Principal of the Friends' Select School, 
Philadelphia; his wife, formerly Jennie 
Wetherlll, a graduate of the West Chester 
State Normal School; Dr. Cumnjlnss, 
Physical Director at Swarthmore College, 
and Chester Ash, of the Coatesville Y. M. 
C. A 

With music from an orchestra com- 
posed of the best performers of the school 
the time of waiting for the beginning of 
the exercises was passed. Both Aryan 
and Moore Societies were represented In 
this orchestra, and each member seemed 
determined to do his or her best. Miss 
Margaret Griffith, of South High street, 
acted as pianist, playing the accompani- 
ments of the evening. 

With a greeting of applause 24 young 
men of the Junior Class, wearing red 
'Sweaters and dark trousers, and each one 
carrying a dumb-bell, filed into the room 
• to the music of a spirited march. In 
obedience to the short, decisive orders of 
Dr. Ehinger the young men went through 
a number of Swedish movements as 
they circled, advanced or retreated. As 
a climax a member of the class bearing 
a pennant rushed to centre of the floor, 
and was Instantly surrounded by the 
others who formed a cluse circle about 
the flag, while they gave the class yell 
with vigor, amid the hearty applause of 
the audience. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 59 



More bouquets were showered at the 
close of this exercise, and the top of the 
piano began to resemble a bank Df roses. 

Forty young girls, many of them mem- 
bers of the Junior Class showed their 
•work in light gymnastics under Mrs. 
Ehinger's instruction. Following the col-_ 
ors of the Junior Class, blue and crimson, 
the young ladies finally marched in single 
Ble from the room. 

TEAM WORK. 

The work of the Gym team on the hori- 
zontal bar was the most difficult, and 
Bhowed the most skill of all. The eight 
young men became perfect acrobats, turn- 
ing, swinging, vaulting and tumbling as 
though the bar had been their native ele- 
ment. Mr. Carl Schrader, one of the force 
of instructors, entered into this part Df 
the programme, giving wonderful proofs 
of the tense fibre of his muscles and his 
perJect bodily control. A pyramid, com- 
posed of eight young men, some head 
-erui some heels uppermost, with which 
this exhibition of skill ended, was hailed 
J)y the audience with enthusiasm. 

Pant two of the programme opened with 
£xeroises with wands by sixteen young 
men of the Junior Class. 

Miss Mary MacElree played the piano 
accompaniment for this number. 

ON THE RAILS. 

A very pretty figure was the exercise 
In fancy steps by twenty-eight of the 
young ladies of the Junior Class. Four 
lines of wooden rails were laid on the 
floor, very much after the manner of a 
double railway track. On these the girls 
stepped, In perfect time to the music, light 
fcr and gracefully as fairies. Presently the 
rails were removed and other measures 
equally pretty, but more intricate were 
id a need with perfect grace. 

The thirty-two young men of the Se- 
nior Class won well merited applause for 
their work with the clubs, combined with 
the Swedish movements. 

JUNIORS SANG. 

The combination of Junior and Senior 
forces In the last scene of the general ex- 
hibition was exceedingly effective. Clad 
in flowing Grecian robes twenty-eight 
young women of the Senior Class came 
upon the floor, and with graceful poses 
Illustrated the emotions and passions. 
Then, while all stood in position the 
Strains of an organ were heard, and the 
Junior Class, which had been massed at 
the rear of the room began singing "The 
Lost Chord," under the leadership of 
■Miss Hardee, chief musical Instructor of 
the school. The solo part of the song 
•was taken by D. 13. Miller, whose voice 
2s well known tn Normal audiences. Dur- 
ing the singing the Grecian maids, in pan- 
tomime illustrated the scenes described 
tn the selection, winning a rousing burst 
of applause. 

With exercises on the buck and horse. 
Which showed thorough training and 
eklll the programme was expected to end, 
tout a final effort came as a surprise to 
the audience. 

In a casual sort of way two groups of 
ioys formed about the bearers of the Se- 
nior and Junior banners. Then at a signal 
from Mr. Schrader a double pyramid, or 
rather two pyramids, formed, the young 
men mounting on each other's shoulders, 
the topmost ones holding the flags. . In 
this position the class yells were given, 
©ne after the other and then all joined In 
ringing a catch in praise of the Normal. 

When the pyramid had dissolved Into 
Its component parts and the audience be- 
gan to move towards the door, the pent 
up enthusiasm of the school could be re- 
strained no longer and class yells were 
heard on every side. 



Th e fun might have continued until 
midnight, had not the bed time bell sent 
In Its warning clanging. making every one 
turn more hurriedly towards the main 
building. 

THOSE WHO TOOK PART. 
Lists of those who took part are as 

follnwic 

Horizontal bar— Nelson Weinberger, 
1900; Randolph Pratt, 1'jCiO; C. T. Mc- 
Creary, 1900; Allan Kriebel. 1901; Gordon 
Saxon, 1900; Harry West; Norman Smith, 
1900; George Evans. Preo. 

Buck and Horse — Arthur Kraus, 190; 
Lewis McCauley, 1900; Alton Kriebel, 
1001; Percy fctrauss. 19 0; .Mattuew Ruth- 
erford, Samuel Mover; W. S. Poorman, 
190C; Henrv \\ ienml. 19C0; Harry West 
C. G Keller, 1000; Norman Smith. 19 0; 
Shortledge Raphael; H. S. Zoilick, "J" 

Junior Wand Roundell— Thus. Mona- 
han. Eugene Sinnell, Arthur Hellyer, 
Raymond Shingles, Harry Slutzman. 
Harry Dengler, Alton Kriebel, Herald 
Hellyer. W A. Merkel. 'Esau Loomis, 
Jr., John M. Keyler, Vincent Gottsliall, 
James Strohl. Chiistian Sanderson. Jus. 

Doane, H. W. Woodward, Edce Cope 
(substitute). - 

2.30 Class, Swedish Work— Beulah 
Huge, Lilian Hughes. Martha Spencer, 
Maud Garrett. Iva Hoffman. Mary Mac- 
Ehee. Augusta VVelsel, Christine Par- 
ker. Nellie Gordon, Mary Hollingsworth, 
Nlta Cashman. Bessie Prlzer. Lilian Hal- 
berstai<t. Katherine Heft, Carrie RUter, 
Zay Engle, May Enihardt. Katherine 
Darlington, Sue Powell. Eva Cloud. Eva 
Stahluecker, Mary McGowan, Lizzie 
Garrett. Caroline Zane. Lidie Harris, 
Anna Endicott. Linda Haines, Frances 
Darlington,. Maude Liggett, E ma Philips, 
Ella Grater, Ida Smith, liessie Fry, 
Helen Guyger. Elizabeth Dave. In, Ber- 
tha Gayman, Sara Matthews. Margaret 
Eaves, Dorothy Donnelly, May Flan- 
nery. 

Long Pole Drill— Emma Bertolet, Mar- 
tha Brook. Anneta Buugey, Ethel 
Chandler. Elizabeth Dobbins. Frances 
Darlington. Edna Dugan, Anna Endicott. 
Bessie Truston, Agnes Feaster, Sarah 
Forrest, Gertrude Hlndenach, Helen 
HnUi-e. Emily II fines. Lynda Haines, 
Emma Isett. Abbie Jamison. May Jef- 
feris, No. a Lynch, Violet Lovett. Mary 
MeClees. Mary MacElree. M ibel Manlev, 
Mabel Martin. Bl inche Moyer Sallie Mil- 
ler, Mabel Nice, Clara Neal. Adella Nel- 
son. Sai-a Philips. Edna Purcell, Emma 
Bertolett, Sadie Protlers, Mary Pierce, 
Elizabeth Ruby, Ruth Re.Mlnn. Etta 
Stubbs. Annie Smedley, Zay Engle, 
Florence Sanders, Laura Splese, Anna 
Sneakman, Rebecca Thomas, Napier 
Tw g2\ Addle Workman. Amv Wells, 
Katherine Truxle. Edith Pasehall 

Seni ir Aesthetic Wok— Anna Srcak- 
man, Mary Eastburn. Sara Phiips, 
Wright, Suah McDowell. Elizabeh Mc- 
Dowell, Maria Hunsicker, Ruth Immel, 
Katherine Bressler. Mary Arnold. Anna 
Ritter, Susie Bowers. Bertha Webb. ICm- 
ma Willis, Linda Haines, Mary Wollua- 
ton, Edith Thompson, Mabel Edwards, 
Eleanor Hough, Nora McFeeley, Mary 



Balr. Margaret Fahey. Marietta Me- 
redith. Sa:a Wethetill. Mary Moore. Jen- 
nie Haines, Blanche Nice, Annabel 
Fearnside. 

Junior Girls — Misses Bessie Prizer, 
Lydie Harris, May Bradigan, Z ty Bngle, 
Max; Emharlt, May Hannery, Fannie 
Darlinften. May Hannum. Maud Gar- 
rett. Lilian Hughes, Isabel Bell, Edith 
Pasehall, Elizabeth Moore. Lilian Hal- 
berstadt, Mary MacElree, Blanche Ford, 

Eva Stahlnecker, Sue Powell, Misses 
Wentz. Welzel, widson. cloud. Parker, 
Connell, Eaves, Merrick, McGowan, 
Zane. Coleman, Beaumont, Gayman, 
FTye, Smith, Guyger, Cashman, Shantz. 
GUESTS FROM THE EAST. 

Among the visitors from the line of the 
trolley road to Philadelphia were the fol- 
lowing: Mr. and Mrs. G. Pearson Cloud, 
Miss Mabel Cloud. East Goshen; William, 
Samud and Howard Morrow. Media; 
Misses Stella and Alta Byers. Wllllstown; 
Mr. ami Mrs. Edgar Pierce. Miss Mary 
Pierce, Edgmont; Chester Biddison. Gosh- 
enville; William Evans, Newtown Square. 
OTHER VISITORS. 

Other visitors who were present during 
the evening were: Abbie A. Eyre, Wil- 
liamson School; Superintendent A. G C. 
Smith. Delaware county; Superintendent 
John I. Robb, Lower Merion, Montgom- 
ery county; Fred T. Windle. Abington; 
Claudia Wilbur. Whitford; Carrie Rorer. 
Wyncote; Margaret Swayne Kennett 
Square: Edgar Bullock. Wilmington; Rev. 
J. M. Keylor, Uwchlan; Dr. and Mrs. 
Granville Prizer. Lionville; Annie Dewlre, 
Kennett Square; Irene Bernard, Royer's 
Ford; D. Brower Longaker, Ogontz; Liz- 
zie Kriebel. Lonsdale; George A. Slgman. 
Elverson; Daniel and John Bartman. Cul- 
legeville; B. Frank Mllsu. St. Peter's; 
Anabelle Skelton. Doe Run; William 
Irwin. Honcybrook; Stauffer KlInk.Kenil- 
worth; Samuel Bowers. Boyertown; Cora 
Buchanan, Honcybrook; Mary Bechtel. 
Roy r's Foi,!; Rae Hippie. Media; Anna 
and Chalotte Fletcher, Philadelphia; Ola 
Griffith. Downlngtown; Kerney Forrest, 
Elmer Forrest .Joseph Trego. Mary Sup- 
lee. Brandywine Manor; Ada Criswell, 
Lenape; Lizzie Anderson. Clifton Heights; 
Gabriel and Guillernu Machado. Phila- 
delphia; Geneva Brown, Malvern; Clay- 
ton Green, Booth's Corner, Ada Con, 
Booth's Corner: Eva Moore, Downlng- 
town: Mr. Slpple. Downingtown: Mr. 

Lord. Garretford; Mrs. Thompson, Miss 
Edith Thompson. Schuylkill Haven; 
Thomas M. McFeerley, Wissihickon; Mrs. 
Ritter. Baltimore: Miss Lizzie Orln, Phil- 
adelphia; Walter E. Greenwood. Esq.. 
Coatesville; Alice Lewis, Uwchlan: John 
Weir. Ridley Park: George A. Hoffman; 
Whiteland; Mrs. Eastburn, Mrs. Nichols. 
Upper Darby: Mrs. Grennaugh. Philadel- 
phia: Mrs. Mahan, Chadds' Ford; Mrs. 
Sanderson, Port Providence; Mrs. William 
H. Wells. Exion: Mr. Watson, Sue Byler, 
Barneston; Mazie Rex, Pottstown. 








W5 v - : # ' lite fsifiHp^ 



60 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




WEST CHESTEP, 




SATURDAY, MABClI/f, 1900. 





NORMAL'S JOINT 

GYM. EX HIBITION 

Graceful Y^eag Men and Women En= 
iertain a Large Assemblage. 



PBICE ONE CENT 



THE GYM. WAS OVKR-CKOWHEt) 



A Pronounced Approval Placet! on the 
Efforts of the Leaders lu the De 
partment of Physical Culture— 
From Fancy Steps to a Boy of 
itrawn — A Winninar Gymnastic 
Team, Ltc, 



Music had an inning at the Normal 
School list night, when the young men 
and young- ladies 6f th'i institution join- 
ed in giving their annual gyrnasin en- 
tertainment. The gymnisiurn vss 
crowded iO the dooTS long before the 
opening- hour. Fully one thousand i:eo- 
ple crowded every available s<paee in 
the mam floor ana the running track. 
So great /'as the demand for room Unit 
it was f iund necessary to reiluce 1"ic 
space I lid aside for the exhibition 
was by far the largest crowd which has 
seen an exhibition in that place, and 
the entertainment afforded has never 
been equalled. The efforts which Dr. 
and Mr: Ehinger, Miss Ada Cornwell 
and Carl Schrader have been putting 
forth since the Christmas holidays ,vere 
rewarded last evening' by a satisfied 
public, who applauded every number 
vigorously. From a standpoint of ap- 
preciation the students expressed them- 
selves with a perfect bower of flowers 
which were presented to each of the 
four directors. 

At ?.!,"> o'clock the exhibition opened 
with music by the Normal orchestra. 
Composed of the best mu»icians from 
both of the school societies, thr i rchea- 
tra rendered the popular airs in accept- 
able manner. The young men of the 
Junior class were the first to appear, 
and they were gTeeted with applause. 
They were attired in red jerseys with 
"1901" on the breast and wearing blue 
pauts. They carried dumb bells. Tak- 
ing their positions they were led by Dr. 
Ehinger through the pretty movements. 
Several combinations were made which 
merited the applause of the hundreds. 
The preliminary Swedish movements 
were excellent. Their marching drew 
to a close in quite a mazy whirl, which 
ended in a rally in the middle of th-> 
•floor. As the boys assembled one of 
their number rushed In bearing- the 
class flag, and about It they gave their 
yell, a feature which was indulged in 
by all the classes to follow. Dr. Ehinger 
was kindly remembered with a hand- 
some bouquet of pink roses. 
ATHLETIC GIRLS. 

A special class of forty-eight young 
ladies received a werm reception as 
they marched In carrying poles. In 
squads of four they lined In two col- 
umns and directed by Miss Cornwell 
they passed gracefully through' their 
figures. Their immaculate white colors 




on the suits of blue gave them an artis- 
tic tt.ppea.r*ince. During a, brief, inter- 
mission the last girl in Pie set of fours 
attached a pivot in the end of each pole. 
When these were placed upf'ght on the 
floor, six ropes of ribbon ir a score of 
colors fell to the Aoot. About eight of 
these the girls danced the May pole 
dane. until the ribbons had been twined 
about the poles This number was one 
of the attractive features of the even- 
ing. Miss Cornwell was kindly remem- 
bered with large bouquets. 

RECEPTION FOR SENIOR ROYS. 

The senior boys received a pronounc- 
ed ovation when they appeared for their 
class marching. They were attired in 
the class uniform of blue and white 
with "1900" in white on their blue jer- 
seys. They marched in columns and 
files and intertwined with each other 
until the audience became confused, 
but the boys knew their parts, and all 
was unwound as merrily as it was mix- 
ed. There was never a tweak. The sen- 
ior girls were the warmest admirers of 
their gallant members, and they led in 
the hearty applause which followed 
every new movement. Flowers were 
again liberally distributed at the close 
of this number. 

A GLIMPSE AT TEACHING. 

Thirty-six young ladies of the 2."0 
class gave an exhibition in free gym- 
nastics, showing simple development 
work, illustrating parts of the daily les- 
son. In this number Mrs. Ehinger led 
them. The development was watched 
with interest. While there was nothing 
of a fantastical nature about it, It 
clearly showed the work as it is em- 
ployed to bring the best results. * 
THE STROKE BOYS. 

Heavy work has "Iways been a lead- 
ing feature in these exhibitions, and 
last evening was no exception. The 
boys' gymnastic team closed part first 
with an exercise on the horizontal bars. 
This is the first time these bars have 
been used in an exhibition for several 
years. The implement is well adapted 
for exhibition purposes, for the move- 
ments of the athletes are in no way 
concealed. The team, by far the larg- 
est and the best the Normal has ever 
turned out, was not Composed of a few 
stars, but all were finished athletes, 
clever students of a clever gymnast, 
Carl Schrader. Led by the latter, a 
team of eight gave an exhibition of 
grace, muscle and skill. C. T. McCre- 
ary's demonstration of strength was 
deserving of special notice. The young 
members of the team, George Evans 
and Harry West, who are still in the 
preparatory department of the school, 
took their parts with the veteran sen- 
iors, and were heartily applauded by 
the members of the younger classes. 
The members of the team were Nelson 
Weinberger, '00: Randolph Pratt, '00; 
Alton Kriebel, '01; Gordon Saxson, '00; 
George Evans, C. T. MoCrearv, '00; 
Norman Smith, '00, and Harry West. 



PART SECOND. 
The orchestra gave a fine concert dur- 
ing the mid-way hour of the program. 
Their selections were a restful change 
from the constant watching. The six- 
teen young men of the junior class 
were next to appear with wands. Their 
figures and po-stures were decidedly pic- 
turesque, and each time when the 
wands would clash in the charges, the 
entire audience would seem startled to 
renewed interest. To add to the attrac- 
tiveness of the scene each boy wore a 
sash of purple and gold about his waist. 
Those who took part In the roundel 
were Thomas Monahan, Arthur Hell- 
yer, H. W. Woodward, John M. Keyler, 
Harold Hellyer. Raymond Shingle. Hnr- 
ry Dengler, Vincent Gottshall, Harry 
Stentzman, Esau Loomis, Eugene Sim- 
well, W. A. Merkel, Alton Kriebel, Jas. 
Strcbl, Joseph Doane, Christian San- 
derson; Edge Cope, substitute. 
GRACE ITSELF. 
Aside from the hea,vy work of the 
boys, the most interesting and enjoy- 
able feature of the evening was the 
exercise in balance and control and 
fancy steps, given by twenty-four 
young ladie3 of. the junior class 

Par* iirst was an exhibition in 
aesthetic gymnastics. The postures were 
given while a chorus of juniors, led by 
Miss Hardee, sang "The Lost Chord." 
On the. gymnasium platform the girls 
gave a very pretty closing pantomime. 
And to top off the evening, a class of 
boys gave a daring exhibition of leap- 
ing on the horse buck. Some of their 
movements were very graceful, espec- 
ially the turns of Mr. Schrader, while 
at other times the boys would line out 
in some daring leaps which made the 
timid spectators shudder. The partici- 
pants in this exercise were Arthur 
Krause, '00; C. G. Keiler, '00: Perry 
Strauss. '00; Matthew Rutherford, prep.; 
Harry West, prep.; Harry Wiend, '00; 
Alton Kriebel, '01; Norman Smith, '00; 
Louis McCauley. '00; W. S. Poorman, 
'00; Raphael Shortle.dge, '01;. Samuel 
Moyer, prep, and H. S. Fulick. '80. 

Physical instructonTwere also, present 
from Baverford, Swaxthmore, 'West- 
town, and several of the Philadelphia 
schools. 

While the crowd was dispersing the 
senior and junior boys formed twin 
pyramids, and above each they waved 
the flags of their clause-, followed eaoh 
with their veil, vu::' all joined in singing 
"Hurrah' for the Normal," accompanied 
by the orchestra. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 61 



Q 



YMNASTIC CARNIVAL 



*@i 



n 



.BY... 



Philadelphia Turngemeinde 
Gymnastic Team 

Under Auspices of 

Normal A thletic Association. 



Saturday Evening, April 14, 1900 



Programme. 

Music, ----- Normal Orchestra 

1 Exercises on Parallel Bars, - - P. T. G. Gymnasium Team 

2 Double Male Quartette, - Normal Students 

" Thou Art My Own Love." 

3 Club Swinging, ... - Mr. Wm. P. Philips 

Haverford College. 

P. T. G. Gymnasium Team 
Normal Orchestra 
Messrs. Wendler and Kassel 



4 Exercises on Side Horse, 
Music, 

5 Foil Fencing, 

(a) Grand Salute. 

(b) Duel. 

6 Vocal Solo, Mr. D. Blaine Miller 

" Danny Decver." 

7 Exercises on Horizontal Bar, - - P. T. G. Gymnasium Team 

8 Double Male Quartette, .... Normal Students 

" Susie Rose." 

9 Pyramids on Parallel Bars, - - - P. T. G. Gymnasium Team 

A larce audience of students and but 
a handful of townspeople assembled In 
the Normal Gymnasium on Saturday 
evening: to witness a rare treat in ath- 
letics, a gymnastic carnival given by 
the Philadelphia Turngepielnde Gym- 
nastic Team as a benefit for the Normal 
Athletic Association. Through the ef- 
forts of Dr. Khinger and Carl Schrade:-, 
the dispensers of physical culture In the. 
school, these graceful and muscular 
young fellows, representing the flower 
of the American amateurs were brought 
to West Chester. Interspersed with vo- 
cal and instrumental musk: from the 
Normal students, the evening was a de- 
lightful combination meriting the ap- 
plause which came constantly in bursts 
from hundreds of appreciative specta- 
tors. 

An exercise on the parallel bars open- 
ed the exhibition. To the time of a 
quick march the nine members of the 
team, led by Captain Paul Wendler, 
marched into a line in the rear of tho 
apparatus, face! to the front and await- 
ed their turn to exercise. They were 
uniformed in black jerseys and gray 
knickerbockers, with red belts girdling 
their waists. Prom the time that Cap- 
tain Wendler took to the bars until the 
evening's exhibition closed there was 
not a movement which did not evidence 



GYMNASTIC CARNIYAL 

AT THE NORMAL 



fhie Young Gymnasts, of Philadelphia, 
Give Creditable Exercises. 



STARS AND FENCING 



Charles Mnnc Won Mnuy Admirers 
by His Graceful Work— A Compli- 
ment for Normul's Gym— Vocal and 
Instrumental MdbIo lntorspored— 
Itec-cptloa to the Visitors— Some 
Amatuer C.liumplous. 



the finished gymnast. Those who have 
seen Mr. Schrader in some of his prr- 
f"rmunces while warming- up have be- 
held with eyes cf wonder the graceful 
movements, but here were nine innii 
equally as finished giving a variety of 
executions with such effects that ap- 
plause came involuntarily. This was 
especially so of the all-around work of 
Charles Mang and Paul Sixtus. who arc- 
candidates in the international gym- 
nastic meet to be held in Philadelphia 
this summer. 

Mang attracted notice from his size, 
but it proved no hindrance in his pxhibi- 
tions in all numbers. At the close of 
the carnival when approached by 
friends with words of praise he stated 
that he believed this was the best exhi- 
bition he has given. He, with the other 
members of the team, credited this to 
the apparatus which the Normal af- 
forded. Captain Wendler is himself a 
graceful performer as well as a capital 
leader for the team. 

The Normal beys composed a double 
quartet and sang "Thou Art My Own 
Love." They were generously applaud- 
ed by hundreds of fair admirers. Wil- 
liam P. Philips, of Haverford Colleg-. 
son of Dr. G. M. Philips and a graduate 
of the Normal School, was the next per- 
former in an exhibition of Hub swing- 
ing. The young man having recently 
token third honors in club swinging in 
the inter-collegiate meet in New York 
with Yale and Columbia ahead of him, 

the glittering clubs as they were ma- 
nipulated through the snakes and half- 
snakes with the various combinations, 
faster than the eye could follow. His 
early training in Normal Gym. is win- 
ning him laurels abroad. 

The exercise on the side h«rse was 
another pleasant feature of the visitors' 
carnival. In this Mang was again tho 
favorite, although all seemed to take 
kindly to the apparatus. The Normal 
orchestra gave a medley as an intermis- 
sion number, after which the foil fenc- 
ing, one of the star events of the even- 
ing, was indulged in by Messrs. Wen- 
dler and Lewis. To many fencing came 
as a new departure in athletics. The 
event was given in two numbers. The 
"Grand Salute" was a series of sharp 
attitudes. Tho duel, involving move of 
the dash, pleased the audience. With 
Mr. Schrader as referee each partici- 
pant scored two points. Mr. Kessel, 
whose place was taken by Mr. Lewis, 
was unable to be present on account of 
illness. An announcement was made t: 
this effect bv Mr. Schrader. 

The gymnasts were~somewhat handi- 
capped on the horizontal bar by the. 
wooden bar, having- done their training 
on a small iron one. After the first turn 
they accustomed themselves and gave 
a rare exhibition of strength and agil- 
ity. The double male quartet sang 
"Susie Rose," a descriptive number, and 
received an encore. The exhibitions 
closed with pyramids on the parallel 
bars. Like clock work they arranged 
themselves 'before the apparatus and 
followed commands to and from their 
attitudes. At their close they gathered 
and gave their yell with a long "West 
Chester Normal" at the end. The Nor- 
mal boys were not long in giving the 
response. 

This team of clever athletes is com- 
posed of these young men: Captain Paul 
Wendler, Charles Mang. Paul Sixtus, 
Carl Cottwald, Adolph Owesnv. John 
Grieb, Charles Lewis. Max Hess and 
Victor Noth. They are amateur per- 
formers throughout and give exhibitions 
simply for the pleasure they derive. 
They were well pleased with their re- 
''ptinn and complimnted Normal upon 
me fine gymnasium. 



62 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



ANNUAL PUBLIC ILLUSTRATION 

ol I he 

I );iil v I K/wlopiiKMlUil 
rind > hdiicativc' Work.... 

ol UK- 
PHYSICAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT, 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 
West Chester. Pa., 

FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 1st, 1901, 

ill '/■/><) 0'< lOl I'.. 

Joint Gymnastic Entertainment* 

Young: Ladies and Young Men, 

GYMSA31VM OF 

West Chester State Normal School, 

West Chester, Pa.. 

Friday 'Evening, March 1st, 1 901, 



AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 
NarmilSluilmii and Children, > 



28 FEBRUARY 1901 



is owt«. 



Part I. 

M u£ic 

1 . Cs) MARCH IMG 

f MARCHING CA L 1ST rt ffJ Id $ 

Clfi^ rrf JUf/ifft Vou«* lAnif. 

J ( a )ft?F £ G YMNA^llC S SrYfBISM OAf'S OROtfc 

l&f tefeeises with Dumb etus- 

yOUKG A7f« '? d"W'0r"O4S6 
3 pfiAoTirt TtACHINC Ft.; f S>1 v? iOPM£ HrAL UonK 



4. MAhCHlMG DF'll 



,-fooss «£Cs Semap Ciass 



5, PAHfilll'* BAK5 t10F,M*L GYnKASTIC. Tf»M 

pari II. 

M US/C 

1, FANCY C(U8 SWHGIIMG LI SWl UfH WooRfS 

2. (o0 f <k\ I -Df VEIOPMENTAL WORK- 
(b)£ Xt h'CISE<3 WITH WANDS- 

Twr/trr Vovng iAous of jvHioe cites 

3, CIAS') FiNCIrUG SPfClAl STOOtNTi Pfti PACING to 

9>f II Acmfts or GV/hnaS'ic$ 

4, r»U'fe SrVHMC.lMG ........ YotfHCMCHQf SfKltRCiASi 

5. «o*/?ow7/k SA*/ fi :g/?m/)/ GtmHt&m team 

6. POSTUKI S /1/VD rfyNcy SfFf^s. w;?w CAST/xv* 7 4cv 

COHfAtHU^CKT 

-Tu/tffy you HO WflWS of StUtat Ci/^SS 

1 MARCH 1901 



GYMNASTICS. 

Annual Public Illustration of the Dally 
Development and Educative Work of the 
Phvslcal Training Department of the 
WEST CHESTER STATE NORMAL 
SCHOOL, to be held In the GYMNA- 
SIUM. 

FRIDAY EVENINO, MARCH 1ST, 
AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 

The programme Includes Plain and 
Fancy Marching, Free Gymnastics and 
Practical Teaching. Club Swinging and 
Exercises with Wands and Dumb Bells, 
Marching Calisthenics, Fencing. Work 
on the Horizontal and Parallel Bars. 

The aesthetic number of the evening 
will be Postures and Fancy Steps In cos- 
tume, with castanet accompaniment, by 
twenty young ladles of the Senior Class. 

General Admission 35 cents 

Reserved Seats 50 cents 

Children (General Admission) 15 cents 

Children occupying reserved seats. 50 cts 

Tickets on sale at Rupert's. 



Joint Gym Entertainment. — 

Nearly all 'the chairs in town are be- 
ing engaged for the platform In the 
Normal School gymnasium, to accommo- 
date the patrons who will attend to- 
morrow night's exhibition. The depart- 
ment of physical training has been In 
existence here eleven years, and this is 
the ninth entertainment season, and the 
fourth Joint exhibition. To the credit of 
Dr. and Mrs. Ehlnger. the house has al- 
ways been packed. It will hold from 
800 to 1.500, aerordlng to the manner In 
which the students crowd the gallerv. 
This year the programme promises to 
be more popu lar than eve r. -v-vi 



...Joint Gymnastic Entertainment... 

Young Ladies anil Young Men, 

Gymnasium of WEST CHESTER STATE NORMAL SCEOOL 
West Chester, Fa., 

Friday Evening, March 1st, 190 J, 

AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 
Reserved Seats, - 50 Cents. 



RIGHT 
Row }\._.__ 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 63 



2 MARCH 1901 



la the gymnasium at the State Normal 
School last evening the department of 
physical training gave the finest exhibi- 
tion on record. It was more elaborate 
than any previous one, and the details 
were executed with greater care and 
precision. The house \has seldom, per- 
haps never, contained more people, and 
Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ehlnger and their as- 
sistants are to-day receiving' showers of 
compliments on the excellent work of 
their pupils. "^ — X-- 

The audience was one 'of the largest 
In the history of the department, and 
seldom has a crowd been more enthu- 
siastic. On the front row of the raised 
seats which occupied the south side of 
the main floor sat the Principal of the 
school. Dr. George Morris Philips, In a 
place where he could keep an eye on 
the entrance and pay attention to any 
special guests who might have come 
from a distance. Beside him were the 
trustees and their wives, and scattered 
over the house were the members of the 
Faculty, mostly sandwiched in among 
the parents and friends of the students. 
There were admiring fathers and 
mothers from neighboring counties, who 
had come to see their daughters per- 
form; there were former students, who 
returned In the hope of meeting old 
friends, and there were innocent looking 
young couples from the country, who 
had Just drifted In tor a place to spend 
a pleasant evening. These filled the re- 
served seats, which were popular at 
60 cents a chair as they were In 
past seasons at 35. Among the appre- 
ciative critics were Beveral members of 
the Home Cluster, who are always to be 
depended upon for patronage at these 
annual exhibitions. 

As to the galleries— there was scarcely 
room to breathe on the wide running 
track which extends all around the 
building, and at such times makes a 
convenient balcony. 

The ushers and ticket takers, who had 
their hands well filled With business 
during the early part of the evening, 
were Walter 8. Talbot, -Howard 8eipt, 
James Strohl, Guy Grayblll,- Charles C. 
Roberts and Isaac Roberts, and, the 
boys who handed dot programmes were 
Ralph Johnson and Frank Acosta. 

For half an hour befor*, the pro- 
gramme was begun the West Chester 
Orchestra played, and played well, while 
the- young people added an accompani- 
ment of applause at frequent intervals 
when favorite instructors appeared. 
MARCHING NUMBER DRILL. 

The first number was a pretty drill by 
twenty-four girls In' blue gymnasium 
suits, with bright yellow sashes, who 
after marching- and countermarching, 
stepped backwards, obliquely. In circles, 
and made figures of various sorts In a 
pleasing way. Miss Sara Philips and 
Miss Anna James were the leaders in 
the work, tinder the direotlon of Mrs. 
Ehlnger, who stood in the middle of the 
floor, i marking time with her closed fan. 
Mrs. Ehlnger wore, a waist of white 
satin, stripe, with black velvet" sleeves 
and black skirt, and gave her commands 
In a low tone, which only the girls could 
hear. The students, who took part 
were : 

Annie Alderfer, Ida Achey, Delia 
Adams,' Anna'Cronln, Carrie Chandler, 
Margaret Deboraw, Margaret England, 
May Hunslcker, Anna James, Nora 
Lynch, Cpnstance Locke, Emma Mere- 
dith, Emma L. Meredith, Margaret Mc- 
Causland, Sue Remnle, Muriel ' Swift, 
Lillian Stlnson, Edith Seal, Erma Shen- 
aman,' Martha Taylor, Nettie Taylor, 
Elizabeth Thompson, Annie Wells, Lil- 
lian Weaver. 

JUNIOR DUMB BELLS. 

Junior boys, with dumb bells, tinder 
the command of Dr. C. E. Ehlnger. came 
next." They wore ' blue shirts, with or- 
ange figures. "1902." across the breast. 



and gray 'trousers, with black stripes 
down the side. They put down their 
dumb bells, after a few motions, then, 
stepping apart In open order, ' went 
through a number of arm and knee ex- 
ercises with military precision, at times 
to so rapid music on the piano that 
their cheeks glowed. In this drill, as the 
one before It, the motions were quite in- 
tricate and unusually pretty, more so 
than in other years, it seemed. 

AS the boys and girls do not have their 
gymnasium practice at the same time 
the work of the boys was as great a 
novelty to the girls of the school as it 
was to those from the town, and when 
the girls appeared the boys looked on 
with equal Interest. This is one reason 
why the house went wild when the boys 
of "Noughty-two" lay prostrate on the 
flooi| and after thumping the boards 
with" their bells, above their heads and 
at their sides, scrambled to their feet 
again in perfect time. Here are their 
names: 

David O. Allen, D. S. Ashcom. A. R. 
Bechtel. C. B. Bressler, Clayton T «ich- 
man, Alfred Carey, J. R. Cronln, John 
Cawley, John Farra, Elmer Gotwals. R. 
G. Godshall, Clarence Long. William 
Mlller7 Samuel Moyer, Paul MacElree, 
Milton McCullough, D. S. Molyneaux, 
Isaac Pike, J. Y. Pennypacker, J. H. 
Reos. W. K. -Ruth. H. R. Srrlith, A. M. 
Smulllng. W. Stauffer, James Strohl, F. 
W. Wach. A. J. Wanner, Warren Web- 
ster, C. H. Stubbs, Wm. Butler Windle, 
W. F. Yoder. 

PRACTICE TEACHING. 
Thirty-two Senior girls In four sections 
gave a class exercise, the sections being 
led by the Misses Engle, Paschall, 
Stewart and Zane. These showed how 
they will practice teaching when they 
organize classes in their own . schools, 
and the work was watched with inter- 
est, and though the audience could not 
In all caseB understand exactly what was 
going on, the variety served to show 
what can be done by tho girls them- 
selves, without assistance or accompani- 
ment. They wore suits of blue, trimmed 
with red. and one of their number car- 
ried a banner of the same colors. At 
the close of this/ number, two of the 
Class of 1901 carried in handsome bou- 
quets, which they presented to Mrs. 
Ehlnger and Miss Ada W. Cornwell, tho 
latter being the accompanist. The Senior 
girls were: \, / 

Miriam Allem, Anna Barnett. Mab^l 
Beaumont, Ella Buchanan. Helen Broom- 
all. Eva Cloud, Katharine Darlington, 
Georgia Dalley. Alice Downle, Zay En- 
gle, Mary Geller. Mary Griffith, Bertha 
dayman, Lizzie Garrett, Lillian Halber- 
stadt, Lillian' Hughes, Mayme Horn, 
Grace Hood. Margaret Himmelrlght, 
Jeannle Nichols, Alary Mcflowan, Sadie 
Prothero, Anna Peters, Bessie Prizer, 
Edith Paschall, Mary Rynear, Emily 
ltaeder, Hattle Schautz, Marlon Smith, 
Rebecca Steward. Elsie Stetson, Ida 
Smith, Martha Spencer, Anna Tavlor, 
Nellie Walter, Helen Williams, Caroline 
Zane. 

GYMNASIUM TEA^I. 

Led bv Instructor Lewis, a class of 
ten young men in the special gymnasium 
class, marched out like gladiators and 
began work on the parallel bars. They 
wore white gauze shirts with half sleeves 
and on the breast a big letter ' N. One 
after another they ran up the spring- 
board and, placing their hands upon the 
high bars, easily vaulted ever, everv ef- 
fort being followed by a round of ap- 
plause from tho large audience Occa- 
sionally there was a slip, and the per- 
former would try again, but no accidents 
occurred and the house was very lndul- 
cent Harrv Dengler was handicapped 
by liavlng more weight to lift than tho 
others, but held his own, and Llewellyn 
Hoopcs. of West Chester, was one of the 
blight stars. Instructor Lewis was the 
best of the company. The closing feat 
was a series of fine pyramids. The class 
is composed of these: 

Llewellvn Hoopes, Alton Krlebel. Wil- 
liam Miller. Henry Gaston. Raphael 
Shortlldge. Lewis Gaston Harry Deng- 
ler, Harold Albright, John >\. Dolby, 
Harvey P. Parsons. 



OLD BANNERS APPEAR. 
During the interim between the first 
and second parts of the programme, the 
hearts of returned students were made 
glad by the appearance of two familiar 
banners. From the west gallery drooped 
the graceful folds of blue and white, 
which waved above the Class of 1900, 
while over the doorway on the east side 
were seen the silver and purple of 1899, 
away back In the old century, when all 
the earth was young. Leaning against 
the woodwork near the doorway was 
the bright new emblem of black and yel- 
low, which had been provided for the 
night by the Class of 1902. 

Llewellyn Hoopes swung the ebony 
dumb bells In line style, and then the 
Junior girls appeared, with Miss Corn- 
well as their directress. 

The Juniors wore blue suits with the 
year of the class in an Impressive style 
on the left breast. The "0" was embroid- 
ered In yellow on the blue background, 
while the "2" was In black on a broad 
satin ribbon of yellow, this producing a 
striking but very pretty effect. The girls 
drilled with wands, which they moved 
gracefully and effectively. At the close 
of the number they presented flowers to 
their Instructors. Those who took part 
were : 

Lydia > Allebach, Mabel Ashenfelter, 
Margaret Buchanan, Anna Cressman, 
Frances Doane, Agnes Feaster, Margaret 
Fleck, Florence Falrlamb, Dahne George. 
Nellie Gordon, Iva Hoffman, Mamie 
Harvey, May Henry, Jennie Hammond, 
Elizabeth Heck, Emma Isett, Elizabeth 
Jacobs, Jennie Le Rue, May MIddleton, 
Mary Metlar, Olive McCollurq, Sallie 
Miller, Hettle McCaughan. Mary Mac- 
Elree, Leila Martin, Mary Martin, Mary 
Markley. Mary Nyce. Clara Neal. Rachel 
Plank, Sara Philips, Mary Plnkerto*, 
Elma Philips, Mary Pierce, Anna Robins, 
Elizabeth Raysor, Helen Raezer, Bertha 
Server, Ethel Speakman, Florence Saun- 
ders, Rachel Struthers, Annie Smedley, 
Helen Thompson, Lldie Vandegrift, Olive 
Whltson, Elizabeth Wood, Lucy White, 
Alice Yarnall, Amy Yerkes. 

CLASS FENCING. 

Six special students who are prepar- 
ing to teach physical training gave an 
exercise in fencing. They were Misses 
Darlington, Engle. Griffith and Paschall 
and Messrs. Kriebel and Hoopes. Wear- 
ing masks and handling foils, they made 
passes at one another In animated fash- 
ion, while their swords clashed together 
merrily. A flashing arc light which be- 
gan to caper during this performance 
reminded the audience of scenes from 
"Faust" or Richard III. and at times it 
seemed as though the blood must flow, 
but fortunately no one was Injured, and 
the fencers were able to depart In safety. 

The gymnasium team performed some 
fine work on the horizontal bar, and 
then came postures and fancy steps with 
caslanet accompaniment by twenty 
young ladles of the senior class. They 
were in Spanish costumes, with red 
waists, blue sleeves to the elbow, red 
skirts and blue oversklrts, broad brace- 
lets at the forearm. The skirts were 
sufficiently short to permit free move- 
ment, and as the wearers stepped back 
and forth across the floor, their casta- 
nets clacking and their bright gilt but- 
tons flashing in the light, one might 
imagine himself among the beauties of 
old Madrid. The graceful poses and 
light motions to slow music were very 
taking. These are the one who appeared 
lh the final scene: 

Edith Babb. Adda Brooks, Ethelyn 
Bunting, Edna Clark, Nlta Cashman, 
Amy Craven, Mary Connell, Eleanor 
Groff, Ada High, Lydle Hannls, Marian 
Irwin, Pearl Leatherman. Zlta Mallon, 
Florence Merrick, Elizabeth Paul, Eliza- 
beth Parker, Elsie Smith. Eva Stahl- 
necker, Augusta Weisel,' Mabel Wilson. 
VISITING TEACHERS HERE. 

Several visiting teachers saw the 
gymnastic carnival at the Normal School 
last night, among them being, Supt. John 
I. Robb, of the Public schools of Lower 
Merlon, Montgomery county; Miss Evelyn 
Young, Miss Trask, Girls' High School, 
Philadelphia: Miss Palmer, Girls' Nor- 
mal School; Mr. Peak, Physical Director 
at Boys - House of Refuge, Glen Mills; 
Mr. Eves, George School; Mr. Rody, 
Temple College; Miss Wagner, Darling- 
ton Seminary; Miss Ella J. Mather, Bryn 
Mawr. 



64 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



"AMULET" MARCH 1901 



In the gymnasium, March first, the de- 
partment of physical training gave the fin- 
est exhibition on record. It was more 
elaborate than any previous one, and the 
details were executed with greater care and 
precision. The audience was one of the 
largest in the history of the department. 
For half an hour before the program was 
begun the West Chester Orchestra played. 

The first number was a pretty drill by 
twenty-four girls in blue gymnasium suits, 
with bright yellow sashes, who after march- 
ing and countermarching, stepped back- 
wards, obliquely, in circles, and made fig- 
ures of various sorts in a pleasing way. 

Junior boys, with dumb bells, under the 
command of Dr. C. E. Ehinger, came next. 
This effort deserves great praise for the 
boys did fine work. 

Thirty-two Senior girls in four sections 
gave a class exercise, the sections being led 
by the Misses Engle, Paschall, Stewart and 
Zane. These showed how they will prac- 
tice teaching when they organize classes in 
their own shools, and the work was watch- 
ed with interest, and though the audience 
could not in all cases understand exactly 
what was going on, the variety served to 
show what can be done by the girls them- 
selves, without assistance or accompani- 
ment. 

Senior young men, to the number of 
twenty-four, attired in red shirts and blue 
trousers, with red stripes, gave a drill to a 
quickstep on the piano. Dr. Ehinger was in 
command. The rapidity of the motions 
required very quick eyes and responsive 
muscles on the part of the boys, who did 
their work in a very creditable manner, and 
formed figures by no means easy. Later 
they appeared with clubs, which they 
swung in a style acceptable to the audience. 

Led by Instructor Lewis, a class of ten 
young men in the special gymnasium class, 
marched out like gladiators and began 
work on the parallel bars. Llewellyn 
Hoopes, of West Chester, was one of the 
bright stars. Instructor Lewis was the best 
of the company. The closing feat was a ser- 
ies of fine pyramids. 



Du-ing the interim between the first and 
second parts of the program, the hearts of 
returned students were made glad by the 
appearance of two familiar banners. From 
the west gallery drooped the graceful folds 
of blue and white, which waved above the 
Class of 1900, while over the doorway on 
the east side were seen the silver and pur- 
ple of 1899, away back in the old century, 
when all the earth was young. Leaning 
against the woodwork near the doorway 
was the bright new emblem of black and 
yellow, which had been provided for the 
night by the Class of 1902. 

Llewellyn Hoopes swung the ebony clubs 
in fine style, and then the Junior girls ap- 
peared, with Miss Cornwell as their di- 
rectress. 

Six special students who are preparing to 
teach physical training gave an exercise in 
fencing. They were Misses Darlington, 
Engle. Griffith and Paschall and Messrs. 
Kriebel and Hoopes. Wearing masks and 
handling foils, they made passes at one an- 
other in animated fashion, while their 
swords clashed together merrily. 

The gymnasium team performed some 
fine work on the horizontal bar, and then 
came postures and fancy steps with castanct 
accompaniment by twenty young ladies of 
the senior class. They were in Spanish cos- 
tume. 




1 March 1901 Exhibition — Spanish Dancers 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 65 



SENIOR BOYS. 

Senior young men. to- the number of 
twenty-four, attired In red shirts and 
blue trousers, with red stripes, pave a 
drill to a quickstep on the piano. Dr. 
Ehlnser was in command. The rapidity 
of the motions required very quick eyes 
and responsive muscles on the part of 
the boys, who did their work in a very 
creditable manner, and formed figures 
by no means easy. Later they appeared 
with clubs, which they swung In a style 
acceptable to the audience. Their names 
are these: 

Alvln Pinner, Charles Burkhardt, E. G 
Booz. Edge Cope. Harry Dengler, John 
\Y. Dolby. Carroll Emery. Vincent Ood- 
Rhnll, Arthur Hellyer, Harold Hellver, 
Alvln Godshall. Alton KrlebH, Edward 
Keenan. Reed Kirkland. Rudolph Long- 
shore. Esau Loomis. C. P. AlcCord. R 
B. Rosenberger, J. W." Rockey. Chris- 
tian Sanderson. Eugene Slmrell, Ray- 
mond Shingle, Raphael Shortlldge, Har- 
vey Vandersice, H. W. Woodward. 



v. T * 



* ♦ ♦ t dr 



SENIOR MEN'S GYM CLASS - 1901 
Dr. Ehinger, Back row. Center; Chris Sanderson, Back row. Left 



ELEMENTARY 



EXPLANATIONS 



tub Swinging' Series 



Club Parts- 1, head; 2, neck; 3. body; 4, base. 

Grasp— Head in middle of n.ilm. thumb and index finger 
extended along neck, remaining finpers flexed 
around head and upon palm. 



WITH 



Starting Positions- 



Leg and Body Movements 



ARRANGED BY 



Modes of Coming 
to Position 



C. E. EHINGER, M. D. 



' 1. Hanging at side of leg. 
2. Arms half "idev/ard bend— Cross 
(.e* standing position— Swed. 

1. Arms forward raise. 

2. ^rms sideward raise. 

3. Arms cross inwards raise. 

'4. Arms pendulum raise (outside 

or inside) 
' 5- Arms forward (sideward) front 

or back hand circles raise. 
, 6. Combinations. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



West Chester, Pa. 



Raisings and Rests 



1. Raising/? Exten sion . 

" 16 Hexion. 

2. Rest (? Extension. 

{0 Hexion. 



Arm opening and closing. 



3m6&g%^»?m3m€%»?m%%3mxesex 



Circles 



r 1. Arm / Outward and inward, forward and 
1 1 backward. 

■x 2. Hand \ Outward and inward, back and 
[ front of arm. 

3. Palm Ball and socket. 



I 



All elementary movement and series consist of raisings 
and rests, openings and closings, without circles. 



66 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



SERIES I 



SERIES 2 



EXTENSION RAISINGS 

All movements in the following series are started from 
Position I — clubs at side of legs. 



i. Forward. 

2. Forward obliquely upward. 

3. Forward upward. 

4. Sideward. 

5. Sideward obliquely upward. 

6. Sideward upward. 

7. Outward (.right or left oblique). 

8. Outward obliquely upward. 

9. Outward upward. 

10. Backward outward [right nr left rear oblique.] 

11. Backward outward obliquely upward. 

12. Backward outward upward. 

13. Combine the oblique positions with the downward 

oblique on the opposite side. 

14. Combine with Touchtoe, Stepping, Charging, Heel 

Raising and Knee Bending, Trunk Flexion and 
Twisting. 

SERIES 3 



Note -Before commencing this series, arm and hand 
circles should be taught in the various directions. 

All movements in the following series are started from 
clubs in position, i. e. arms half sideways bend, clubs ver- 
tical, base upward, knob in palm, thumb and index finger 
upon neck of club. 

1. Arm circles inward (1); Extension arm rest (2); Trunk 

forward bend (3); Trunk raised (4); Clubs raised 
(by fingers) and swinging downward crossing be- 
low (51; Outside hand circles (behind shoulders) 
(6); Swing downward inward (7); Position (8). 

2. Same bending left on 3-4. 

3. Same bending right on 3 -4. 

4. Arm circles outward (1); Bent arm rest infront forward 

raising sideward flexion (2); Trunk backward bend 
(3); Trunk raise (4); Raise clubs and continue arm 
circles inward (5); Hand circles inward (6); Arm 
circles inward (7); Position (8). 

5. Same arm movements with charging forward on count 

2, kneeling on 3, trunk sideward bending on 4, rais- 
ing on 5, recover to first standing position arm cir- 
cles inward on 6, hand circles outward 7, positions. 

6. Same arm movements with charging backward on 2, 

forward raise sideward flexion; kneeling on 3, trunk 
bending backward 4; trunk raising on 5; recover to 
first position with arm circles inward 6; hand circle 
inward 7; postion 8. 

7. Make arm movements continuous as in 1 and 4 com- 

bined without coming to position until 32d count. 
Make inside hand circles on count 8 in place of 
coming to position. 

Charge forward on 2, backward on 6 (with left). 
Repeat same with right. On 18th count charge to 
left, to right on 2id, again to right on 26th, to left 
on 30th and position on 33d. 

8. Same arm movements with heel raising on 2. knee 

bending on 6. 



Extension a,nd Flexion Rests with arm opening 
and closing. 



1. Extension rest forward. 

2. Extension rest forward upward. 

3. Extension rest sideward. 

4. Extension rest sideward upward. 

5. Sideward raising, forward flexion arm rest. 

6. Forward raising sideward^flexion arm rest. 

7. Sideward flexion backward. 

8. Double extension rest forward, open to extension rest 

sideward. 

9. Double extension rest sideward, arm closing forward. 

10. Double extension rest sideward, arm closing upward. 

it. Double forward raising sideward flexion, open to ex- 
tension arm rest sideward. 

12. Double extension rest sideward, close to forward 
raise. sideward flexion. 

13. Combine with Touch-toe, Stepping, Charging, Heel 

raising and Knee bending, Trunk flexion and 
Twisting. 

SERIES 4 



Note— This movement is varied by having alternate 
files commence movement in opposite direction-.: e. g. 
Odd files arm circles inward with rising on toes and com- 
ing to extension arm rest sideward on 2. Even files com- 
mencing with arm circles outward coming to forward 
raise sideward flexion and bending knees on 2. 

9. Arm circles forward to starting position 1; (Clubs out- 
side av.C. close to legs. Never swing back of legs) 
Double extension arm rest forward with charg- 
ing forward, left (2i; Arm parting (3); Closing (4); 
Recover with hand circles forward back of arm 15); 
Starting position 1, (6); Raise arms forward and 
hand circles backward back of arm (7); Position (8). 

10. Same with charging forward with right foot. 

11. Arm circles inward (1); Charge left and extension 

arm rest sideward (2); Arm closing (3); Arm parting 
(4); Recover with hand circles outward (5); Arm 
circles inward to cross position below, raise to over 
head in this position (6); Hand circles inward (7); 
Position (8). 

12. Same to right side. 

13. Arm circles inward (D; Charge backward with cluhs 

at extension arm rest sideward (2); Arm closing 
upward with trunk bending backward (3); Trunk 
upward raise to position 2 (4!; Recover with hand 
circles outward (s ; Arm circles inward to cross 
position below and raise over head (6); Hand cir- 
cles inward (7); Position (8). 

14. Same charging with right. 

15. Arm circles outward (1); Charge obliquely forward 

left and come to double forward raise sideward 
flexion (2'; Arm parting (3); Arm closing (4); Re- 
cover with arm circles inward (5); Hand circles in- 
ward [6]; Arm circles inward [7]; Position [8]. 

16. Same charging to right oblique. 



15 APRIL 1901 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 67 



CITY GYMNASTS 

AT THE NORMAL 

Philadelphia Boys Gave an Exhibition of 
Musqie and Skill. 

Junior-* --ins, the Orchestra Plays, 

and a Vocal >olo Add-, to the 

Niirut:- Pleasure - What 

They Uid. 

On Saturday evening at the State Nor- 
mal School the Philadelphia Turnge- 
mcindc g> mna.sium team gave or.e of its 

s. The mus 
numbers on la- prugramme were per- 
it.il by the Normal students. The g.'-l- 
ltiy was occupied by the students and 
the main lloor by town folks and the 
m-mbers of the faculty. Those who act- 
id as I >r the evening were the 

following: II. II. Dengler, Harold Hell- 
yer, James Strohl and E. \V. ICecnan. 
John Dolby was ' seller and E. G. 

liooz was ticket n ceiver. 

The programme was open<-d with three 
selections by the Normal orchestra. Fol- 
lowing this number the Philadelphia 
i.. urn gave various exercises on the file 
horse, which showed the result of long 
ar.d t-arnest work. 

Hiss Netinie L. Smedley. of West Ches- 
ter, then favored tiie audience with a se- 
lected solo. Her meiod.ous soprano voice 
uphlied the hearts ot lovers of music. 
HAND1" WITH CUTIS. 

A. Lovctt Dewees. of Haverford Col- 
lege, l>'i. deserves special praise for his 
lalicy club swinging and jugging. He 
handled the duos with such ease and 
rapid. ty that during his performance ne 
was applauded many tun. s. He brought 
his work to a conclusion by placing ilie 
clubs under his arms and mak.ng a very 
modost bow to his audience. 

Without the Normal Juniors' appear- 
ance tile programme would nave b-<-n 
felt quite incomplete, so seventeen of the 
Junior boys sang a chorus. ' i'here's One 
That I Love Dearly' iKucken tiinvkyi. 
Facing the boys was M.ss Hardee, who 
kept time with exactness. M.ss Vance 
accompanied them on the pi:. no. 
ATTACK AND DEFENCE. 

Messrs. Wendler and Kassel, of the 
Philadelphia team, were introduced by 
Mr. Lewis, assistant instructor in the 
gym. These young men showed their 
skill in fencing, which consisted of a 
grand salute and a duel. Exercises on 
the horizontal bar were given by the 
Philadelphia team. 

.Mr. D. Blaine Miller then sang two 
very striking solos. "The Milk .Maid's 
Song." by Coombs, and 'When Love is 
Done.' by McLean. Mr. Miller was a 
favorite vocalist while a student here 
last year ami his return is greeted with 
pleasure. Miss Hardee played his ac- 
companiment. 

The high jumping was a number on 
the programme which opened the eyes 
of some of those present. The highest 
score was live feet six inches. 

on account of tin- illness of one of the 
Royal Brothers, the tumbling was 
omitted. 

The programme ended by a formation 
of pyramids on parallel bars by the Phil- 
adelphia team, who show -d their pro- 
ficiency in this as in other difficult feats. 




CL/itfK 



1 March 1901— Gymnasts in "Dress Up" 




1 March 1901 — Spanish Dancers 



68 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



ANNUAL 
PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION 

..of the... 

Developmental and 

Educative Work 

...of the... 

Physical Training Department, 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

West Chester, Pa., 

FRIDAY EVE'G, MARCH 7, '02, 

at 7.30 o'clock. 




GYMNASTIC ENTEPTAI N M ENT 

Young Ladies and Young Men, 

C YMNA.SIVM or 

WEST CHESTER STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

WEST CHESTER, PA., 

Friday Evening:, March 7, 1902 



IT .SiJV/.'-V THIRTY O'CLOCK. 



.Vorm.-iJ Simians and Children, 



J5 Cents. 



Orogram 



*■ *■ *• 

U> a it 11 

1. Military Marching \mi running Maze, 

young men from special classes 

2. <; 1 l-REH GY.UNASriCS. Illustrating a Part of the Daily Lesson, 
1/" Fancy STEPS. 

YOUNG LADIES FROM PREPARATORY GRADES 

5. EXERCISES Willi DUMBBELLS, 

YOUNG MEN OF THE JUNIOR CLASS 

4 Ex 1 rcisi-\s Willi Wands, 

YOUNG LADIES OF JUNIOR CLASS 

5 INDIAN CLUB SWINGING, 

YOUNG MEN OF THE MIDDLE CLASS 

f>. Horizontal Bar. 

NORMAL GYMNASTIC I'EAM 

part HH 

1. EXERCISES WITH BAR-BELLS, 

YOUNG MEN OF SENIOR CLASS 

2. COMBINATION EXERCISES WITH RINGS AND BAR-BELLS. 

YOUNG LADIES AND YOUNG MEN FROM SENIOR CI \SS 

3. Fancy Marching, 

YOUNG LADIES OF MIDDLE YEAR CLASS 



4. Fancy Cllb swinging, 



MR. LLEWELLYN HOOPES 



Gymnasts in 1902 Show 
Standing: Charles B. Lewis, Instructor 



5. POSTURES AND ARTISTIC GROUPINGS, 

YOUNG LADIES FRO.M THE SENIOR CI \SS 

6. (<?) Vaulting Exercises on run Long Horse. 

(0) PYRAMIDS, 

NORMAL GYMN \S ITC I F.AM 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 69 





Gymnastic and Acrobatic 
Exhibition 

...By... 

Philadelphia Turngemeinde Gymastic Team < 

Hazel Bros., the LaTels and Mr. Chas. 
Toothaker 
...UNDER AUSPICES OF... 

NORMAL ATHLETIC ASS'N 

JJ Saturday Eve'g', May 3rd, '02 

Selections Aryan Mandolin Club 

Pianist Miss Mary E. MacElree 



P 



5 MAY 1902 



1 



rogram 



1 



Overture Aryan Mandolin Club 

Exercises on Side and Long Horse P. T. Ciym. Team j 

p. nri „„ J i«) Foils 1 Mr. Wendlerand Mr. Kassel ) 

renung ^ [b} BroaJ Swords J Mr Friedgen and Mr. Reith I 

i 

Trick Jumping and High Kicking . . . . Mr. Chas. Toothaker 

( 

Exercises on Horizontal Bar P. I". Gym. Team ', 

i 
i 

Equilibrists (hand balancing) The LaTels | 

Exercises on Parallel Bars P. T. Gvm Team 

8. Tumbling Hazel Brothers ' 

■St 




Muscle was at premium on Saturday 
night. This, combined with grace and 
skill, made a pleasing entertainment. The 
performers were members of the Philadel- 
phia Turngemelnde Gymnastic Club, and 
their work was under the auspices of. the 
Normal Athletic Association. At the 
close of the evening It was found that trie 
treasury had been nicely filled with funds 
for the Spring sports. 

For the past few seasons these men have 
been In the habit of coming to West Ches- 
ter once a year, and their visit Is always 
a pleasure to the people. 

At the opening of the programme the 
team gave an exercise on the vaulting 
buck, performing several feats which 
made the muscles stand out on bare arms 
and shoulders, and showed great power of 
muscle. S-i^ 

Then came a couple of fencing bouts, 
In which Messrs. Wendler, Fuedgen and 
Relth took part, making the steel flash 
and ring In fine style. 

The first novelty work was done by 
Charles Toothaker, who won applause 
from the spectators by his trick jumping 
nnd high kicking. His best Jump was 
when he sprang. Into a flour barrel. In 
which two young men were already stand- 
ing. There was very little space, but he 
found room to jump in without striking 
the side of the barrel. After several -feats 
In high kicking Mr. Toothaker showed the 
people how to kick four tin plates at once, 
when they were held two before him and 
two behind him, about four feet high. 

Fine work on the horizontal bar was 
done by the team, and then the La Tels 
came forward with an exhibition of hand 
balancing. In this the two young men 
performed several acrobatic feats, while 
taking each other by the hands, one bal- 
ancing the other in midair In many diffi- 
cult poses. 

Parallel bars were brought on for the 
team, and with this exercise and a fine 
exhibition of tumbling by Hazel Brothers 
the programme ended. 

Several of those who took part are pre- 
paring to go abroad In 1903, to take part 
in gymnastic meets on the other side. 

During the evening the Aryan Mandolin 
Club rendered several pretty selections, 
and while the gymnastic work was In pro- 
gress Miss Mary MacElree played a piano 
accompaniment. 

Instructor C. B. Lewis, who is a member 
of the Turngemelnde, was floor manager, 
and Dr. C. E. Ehinger, Physical Director 
of the School, was present as an advisory- 
member of the company. 

H. R. Smith was overseer of the house 
and Norman Zarfoss sold tickets, which 
were taken by Guy Grayblll and George 
W. Hellyer. David Allen acted as usher, 
while Lewis Baer and George Llchten- 
berger gave out the programmes. 



^V 




Charles Lewis directing gym team in 1902 show 



Show Rehearsal 



70 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



z?jr°~~ 



lfv» — %y *+* m £jf ••■•■ I jgf" 



Annual Public Demonstration 



1 



-ct lb<— 




^ 



[Is 



I'A KT 1 

MUSIC. NORMAL GR< lll.->i I-'-a 

i. I 'II GYAlN/.STICS-SweJish System. 

Illustrating Part of the Daily Lesson. 

MODEL SCHOOL AND JUVENILE TOWN CI.A- 



j i. shoi.'i Wands, 



BOYS' JUVENILE SEC fH 






-o( tlw- 






;. FNEE GYMNASTICS -Swedish System, 



..Physical training Department.. 



i>^ 



Ulest Chester, Pa. 

Friday evening, march 6, \m 

at 7-3o o'clock 



r 4 I >li.V\B BhLLS. 

5. Fancy marching, 



I '■ F 



1.1 ING RINGS, 



Music 



40 YOUNG LADIES OF JUNIOR CI A- 



R'MOR YOU.V i Ml 



24 YOUNG LADIES OF SENIOR CI. \^ ■ 

N'OKAIAI < A V,\AS"I IC ! I: I V 
I'AKT II 

NORMAL OI CHEST RA 



1. 







Balancing Exercises on Slack wire, iose • penakv/ 



YOUNG MEN OF MIDDLE YEAR < I iSS 



g 1. BaR BELLS, 

3. Club Swinging With Postures, 



18 MEMBERS OF S.ENIOR CI. AS 



7 MARCH 1903 



NORMAL GYMNASTS' 

INDOOR ANNUAL. 

Boys and Girls in Gymnasium Suits 
Perform for Friends. 

Largest Audience on Keoord Packs 

Bulldlnc— Parents and Friends 

Look On and Applaud. 

(From a recent edition o£ the News). 

Last evening the annual gymnastic en- 
tertainment occurred at the West Ches- 
ter Slate Normal School. It was adver- 
tised as n demonstration ot gymnastic 
w.n It, and us Kuril 11 proved a great suc- 
,,■»». 'Client with iiUiii it nuiilliiir »f !•'"- 
luri'H mil of niiv«iUy niul Mi: A imnhiul 
limine llu< liii'B'iil iilli-iuliiiifii mi ivi'oltl III 
Ilia iiyiiiiuinluiii building, erowdetl Hi" tv 
served Benin on Hie main llimr and Hie 
running Iruek, wlileli serves as n iiitllt'ry. 

Dr. and Mrs. I', li Klilnger, and their 
assistants, Llewellyn lloopcs, and Alias 
lJmlly Smedley received showers ot 
praise, and there were congratulations for 
all the young people who took purl. 



4. dumb Bells, 



30 YOUNG LADIES OF MIDDLE YEAR t.l VSS 



,'. \CR< ><;.». I ICS. 

In the audience there were very many 
people from out of town. In fact the ma- 
jority of those occupying reserved seuts 
seemed to have come from a distance, 
but this was no surprise, because in these 
days when West Chester Is so easy of 
access from the outer world, and people 
who come to spend the evening can get 
home the same night, there Is much trav- 
el In this direction. 

Many of those present were teachers, 
some of them being specialists, in this 
department of work, but the great major- 
ity were former students, or the visiting 
parents and friends uf those now attend- 
ing the school. 

experience has taught the much of 
careful arrangements, so that there were 
no breaks In the programme, but a Bteady 
moving succession, with more variety 
and snap than ever before. All this great- 
ly nleased the audience. 



NORM \l 



A UNAS ITC I '-. M 



Social features of the evening were not 
to be overlooked. It was necessary to 
look the greater part of the time, but not 
to listen much. Hence the spectators had 
plenty of time for exchanging comment 
and comparing this year's exhibition with 
those given in previous seasons. At times 
the conversation !n the audience was like 
that In a sewing society at a special meet- 
ing. Then during some thrilling part of the 
programme the house would be silent In 
wonder. 

Among the former students there were 
several who had not met in years, and 
these found the evening greatly to their 
liking, because It afforded an opportunity 
to greet old friends, and see what Im- 
provements have been made since the 
days when they wore gymnasium suits 
and stepped lightly to the music. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 71 




1903 Gym Show Part 1 Number 1 Free Gymnastics 




Dr. Ehinger With 1903 Gymnastic Team 



72 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



On the main floor chairs wr-re [.laced 
around the Hides of the room, except on 
ttie south, where a bank of chairs rose 
tier upon tier for the accommodation of 
guests The chairs on the floor on the 
north and west side were ocupled by the 
pupils who were to take part. They came 
in singly or In small groups-the girls in 
their divided skirts, the young men in 
BwmiK-is, ilnrk Irmisera and while K> •■• 

MlllflUIII bll'l' ;< 

/, ; ,-.h •■! t\*'iUitx, ft* the hour for the 
entertainment to begin drew near, filled 
the chairs rapidly and additional chairs 
were placed in the aisles, by the ushers 
before all could be seated. As members 
of the Faculty entered the students greet- 
ed them with enthusiastic hand clapping, 
which created quite a flurry every few 
moments. 

ORCHESTRA IN TUNE. 
During the Interval of waiting the Nor- 
mal Orchestra, under the leadership of 
Joseph Doan, played "I'll Leave My Hap- 
py Home for You.- and other popular 
airs.keeplng the people In tuneful mood. 

When the class of 63 little people from 
the Model School entered, the foremost 
carrying a red banner— which, though 
small was as much as she could carry— 
the audience broke into a storm of ap- 
plause The young folks marched to their 
places to the spirited air of a march 
played by Miss Margaret Griffith, who 
during the evonlng, acted as accompanist, 
and after a few moments Went through 
a serleB of free gymnastics under leader- 
ship of Miss Smedley. assistant to Miss 
Ehlnger A part of this exercise, which 
proved of special Interest, was a merry 
game In which fieetness of foot and 
quickness of motion were winning quail- 
When this mixed class of boys and girls 
had left the floor, sixteen small boys, a 
special class from the town, led by Eu- 
t-ene Ferron, went through an exercise 
with short wands, in which the muscles 
of arms and chest were given full play 
In a variety of movements, some of them 
quite Intricate, and brought ringing ap- 
plause from the spectators. 

FORTY JUNIORS. 
The floor being cleared again, the spec- 
tators had not time to wonder what was 
coming next, when at the blowing of a 
whistle by Miss Smedley forty Junior 
clrls dashed into tne centre of the room 
with the alacrity of a flock of birds com- 
lne to a feast of some sort. Free gym- 
nastics by the Swedish system. In which 
a' number of new movements were intro- 
duced claimed attention for some mo- 
ments' but their skill In buck vaulting 
niid track walking was the chief feature 
of their number. Placing their hands on 
the leather back of the buck the girls 
went over It In a twinkling, the red sashes 
and ties which they wore with their blue 
flannel suits making a flash of color, 
se«n an Instant, then gone. 

Twenty-six young men of the Junior 
Class under Dr. Ehinger's leadership, 
won 'for themselves a storm of applause 
bv their dumb bell wore. In which mar- 
velously quick changes of posture were 
made to the rhythmic music of the clash- 
ing wooden "bells." As a rtnale the lads, 
nil of whom wore red sweaters with &> 
in biack lettering on the bosoms gath- 
ered in a concentrated group and gave 
their class yell with a right good will. 
FAIR SENIORS. 
The girls of the Senior Class, twenty- 
five of them, made a pretty picture In 
their number, fancy marching They 
„,! white sailor suits, trimmed with 
bands of red red and white being the 
', a ™ colors The banner was borne Into 
?& room by Miss Amle Wells, but dur- 
ng the marching It was held by Miss 
Margaret Fleck. 



DANGEROUS FEATS. 
Stunts on the flying rings by a dozen 
members of the gymnastic team of the 
school received constant applause. Under 
the skillful direction of Llewellyn Hoopes, 
whose manner among the lads is full of 
kindness and good comradeship, they did 
all sorts of feats in midair, the great 
bunches of hard muscles stnndlng out on 
their bare arms in a way which spoko 
plainly of systematic training. 

When the young men formed pyramids, 
the topmost one standing on the shoulders 
of one who stood with a foot on either of 
the swavlng rings, the house first seemed 
to hold Its breath, then went wild with 
enthusiasm and vigorously applauded the 
agile youths. 

ON THE SLACK WIRE. 
Jose Penabnas, one of the Cuban stu- 
dents, was one of the stars of the even- 
ing, in his feats upon the slack wire. 
Dressed as a Chinaman, with cap and 
queue vellow trousers and loose jacket 
the young man balanced himself on the 
ewuving wire, holding above his head a 
Japanese parasol, exchanging this pres- 
ently lor Indian clubs with which to keep 
Ids 'balance true. Before he made his 
linw to the audience the lad had divested 
himself of his fantastic costume, wrig- 
gling out of the various garments while 
hWMVing on the unsteady wire. It was 
duly a foot or so from the floor, and 
the young performer tumbled off two or 
time limes, but he stuck to his pro- 
gramme In a nlueky manner, and if he 
did not equal the professional circus man, 
|n> did remarkably well for an amateur. 
Led by Dr. Ehlnger, sixteen young men 
of the Middle Year Class marched and 
went through a series of graceful move- 
ments wlih "bar bells." long wands hav- 
ing a ball at either end. This number 
conclude. I nlr-o with the class yell, an 
Announcement of their Identity which 
was verV edifying to their classmates, 
however unintelligible it may have been 
to the rest of the audience. 

SENIOR SAILORS. 
A dozen Senior girls and five young 
men of the class gave a fine exhibition 
of fancy club swinging and' made a pic- 
turesque appearance in their sailor suits. 
The girls' costumes were white, with 
red trimmings, which they had worn 
earlier in the evening, but the young 
men's white duck suits were trimmed 
with navy blue and they wore blue sailor 
caps. 

In green and white, tne new banner 
making its appearance for the first time, 
thirty young ladies of the Middle Year 
class gave a graceful exercise with dumb 
bells, led by Mrs. Ehlnger. 

The closing number consisted of acro- 
batic feats by members of the gymnastic 
team, whose tumbling in various styles 
elicited not only applause but cheers from 
the people. 

WHO TOOK PART. 
Those who took part in the class work 
were as follows, according to the official 
lists: 

MODEL SCHOOL. 
Miss Smedley's Room— Myrtle Wlldo. 
Wilbur Pratt, Evalena McDannell, Slxto 
Mestres, Lizzie Brown, Charles Himel- 
right, Esther M. Andrews, Mary Men- 
denhall, Helolse Bugless. Harry Carey, 
Florence Riddle, Katlierlne Futcher, 
Thomas McGrogan. Beneta Lewis, Lind- 
ley Pyle, Emily Dean, Mary Hampton, 
C. Marshall Cochran, Mary O. Wise, 
Clarence Carey, Walter Marr. Jesse A. 
Buzzard, Ethel James, Harry Taylor, 
Roscoe Davis, Margaret Stubbs, Fred 
O'Connell, Edith Conard, Myrta Keech, 
Alice McNeill. William Cavanaugh, Agnes 
Taylor. John Hauselt, Isabelle Carey, 
Francis Malln. 

Miss Woodward's Room— Emily Bnce, 
Mary Baldwin. Katie A. Buzzard, A. 
Ethel Carey, Charlotte Donovan, Lizzie 
Holden. Sara Kerwin, Anna Loomls, 
Lydia Mercer, Marian Passmore, Dorothy 
Pratt, Ella Pratt, Emma Smith, Ellen 
Strode. Ethel Thompson, Alice M. Welch, 
Helen MacElree, Herman Brown, Juan 
Bothe, William Dean, Thomas Evenson, 
Harold Manclll. Clarence McNeill, Wayne 
Marshman. J. Spalding Miller. Lawrence 
Pontzler, Fernando Penabaz, Fred Stew- 
art, Rowland Stcln, Thomas Williams, 
Earl Way, John Winder. 

NORMAL CLASSES. 
Gymnasium Team. Rings and Tumbling 
—Clayton Uachman. Mario Castenado, 
Herbert Detwller, Juan Fernandez, Thos. 
Jackson, Chaa. A. Lemmon, Abraham Mc- 
Collum. Clifford Myers, Ernest Short- 
ledge. Howard Tyson, Lewis Bair. 



Wand Drill, small boys — Juan Bothe, 
Mario Castenado, Wallace Eyre, Eugene 
Ferron. Evan Gheen, William Hall, Mar- 
shall Martin, Milton Oldfield. Hernando 
Penabaz. Florentino Plna, Raul Pina. 
Byron Roberts, Sergio Suarez. D. P. 
Sharpless, Robert Walker, Stanley Wentz. 
Middle Year Boys, bar bell drill— Ed- 
ward Atwell, Matthew Black, Chas. R. 
DeLong. James E. Farrell, Paul Gay- 
man, Robert Gule, James Evans, Ash- 
more Johnson, Ralph Johnson, Jacob 
Kranich, J. Banks Lahr, Geo. W. Llch- 
tenberger. R. M. McCrone, H. M. Men- 
denhnll, Adolph Norsted. George Still- 
wagon. Chester Stlteler, Frank P. Wal- 
ter, Edgar Williams, Frank Woolson, 
Samuel Young. 

Junior Dumb Bell Drill— Hugh Alger, C. 
F. Bnlthaser, J. R. Bechtel, Carlos Car- 
denas, Jesse Cope. Horace M. Davis, 
Clyde C. Dengler. Herbert Detwller, 
Cleveland Flke. John M. Frv. Belvln Glf- 
ford. John T. Gyger, R. K. Gunkle, Kurt 
Herzog, Richard Keen. Charles Lacrone, 
Thomas Leonard, Diego Llacuna, Chester 
March. Abraham McCullom. Thomas 
Monahan, Alvln Moyer, Samuel Shnna- 
man, Morris Stler, John Stlne, Norman 
Swartz. 

GIRLS. 
Middle Year— Frances Aspril, Florence 
Baker, Anna Cronln, Katharine Fletcher, 
Elizabeth Gallagher. Prlscllla Garrett, 
Emma Harr, Mary mil. Harriet Ingram, 
Helen Irey, Anna James, Naomi Lontz, 
Nellie Lewis, Mary Longbrldge, Ethel 
Mason, Mary McFarland, Bertha Mc- 
Causland, Carrie Mock, Alice Moore, 
Clara Neeman, Delia Rambo. Erma Shen- 
aman. Mattle Smith, Lulu Thompson. 
Bertha Tomllnson. Alice Weber, Mabel 
Welsley, Cldney Young. 

Juniors— Elsie Arbogast, Edna Barden, 
Beatrice Blakeslee. Laura Buck, Gernld- 
lne Buzby. Sara Broadhurst, Stella Cass, 
Elizabeth Cope, Lettle Denenhauer, Mabel 
Dresser, Anna Few, Mary England, Grace 
Griswald. Gertrude Groff. Martha Hol- 
colmbe, Elsie Hendloy, Elvora Johnson, 
Rena Keylor, Susanna Martlndale, Har- 
riet McKinley, Helen Moore. Amanda Mc- 
Elroy. Nell Watson, Helen Morris, Lillian 
Morris, Elizabeth North. Mary Price, 
Sara Philips, Mary Rogers. Bella Scott. 
L.nel Sipple, Jessie Sharp, Mary Sharp, 
Ada Smith, Flora Smith, Lillian Stack- 
house, Elda Shuemaker. Elsie Speakman, 
Helen Sheets. Mary Williamson, Eva 
Wait . Jessie Walton, Mabel Weand, Lil- 
lian Yontz. 

Junior Girls— Beatrice Clarke, Adalessi 
Lock, Grace Cochran, Lillian Brunner, 
Helen Hicks, Mary Miller, Lena Green. 
Sara Brunner. 

Seniors with clubs— Gertrude Alden. 
Martha Brooke, Emma Bertolet, Retta 
Church, Emma Conley, Iva Davis. Agnes 
Kepler, Bessie Lambert, Mary I'ierce, 
Plank, Mabel Stecker, Clayton Baehman. 
Howard Tyson. George Hellyer, Leo Bar- 
ron, Milton McCullough. 

Seniors in fancy marching— Gertrude 
Alden, Martha Brooke. Emma Bertolet, 
Katharine Burton, Ella Buzby, Retta 
Church, Emma Conley, Iva Davis, Louise 
Davis, Jennie Heyburn, Gertrude Hln- 
denoch, Emily Ingram, Agnes Kepler, 
Bessie Lambert, Mary McCredy, Ethel 
Metcalf, Olive McCullum, Iva Miller, 
Murv Pierce, Rachel Plnnk. Helen Poley, 
Cerldwen Hosser, Mabel Stecker, Annie 
Wells. 

Ushers during the evening were: Isaac 
G. Roberts, who has long had experience 
in tills work: Jesse Williams, Hayes 
Williams, Messrs. Stotterer and Acker- 
man. 

Tickets were sold at the door by Har- 
vey M. Cooper, manager of the basket 
ball team, and Francis Hallman was a 
guide to dlroct students and the people 
from the town on the way they should 
go. 

Below stairs, where the dressing rooms 
are located. Steward Harry S. Johnson 
stood to direct and advise any who need- 
ed his attentions and cheerful assistance. 
Programmes were handed out hi' Ralph 
Baker, John Llewellyn. Elwood Lewis 
and John Williams. 

SPECIALISTS THERE. 
Several special teachers of gymnastics 
were present In the audience. Some of 
these visitors and their friends were: 
Miss Linelle Garlock. Mr. Clement. Georgo 
School; Dr. Louisa Smith and Miss Isa- 
bel Small, Bryn Mawr; Miss Caroline 
Wollaston, Swarthmore; Felicia Thomas. 
Westtown; Miss Adams. Miss Bally, 
Friends' Select School. Philadelphia; Mrs. 
Klrcher, Temple College: Miss Sara 
Hamilton, Friends' Select School, Wilm- 
ington. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 73 



^> ANNUAL 

| PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION 



Program 



PART I 



I. [>] SCHOOLROOM FREE GYMNASTICS 

[/'] GAMES • Middle and Upper Grade Pupils of Model School 



OF THE WORK 



of the 



Physical Training Department 



2. LONG POLES 



3. GERMAN TACTICS 



State Normal School, 
West Chester, Pa. 



4- DUMB BELLS 

5. BUCK AND SPRINGBOARD VAULTING 



Boys' Juvenile Class 

Class of 16 Young Women 

Junior Young Men 

"Gym." Team 



Friday Eve'g, March 4th, 1904 

at 730 o'clock W 



6. [„] MARCHING , 6 Young Men of Senior Class 

[7>J CLUB SWINGING AND POSTURES 

24 Young Women and Young Men of Senior Class 
PART II 



r*%y 



o& 



I. HORIZONTAL BAR 



'Gym." Team 



SYNOPSIS OF PANTOMIME 



i. Aenone. a young Greek maiden appeals for her father's life to Cam- 
bes. a nobleman of infamous character, who has, through intrigue, 
secured his unjust imprisonment and condemnation to death.. 
Cnmbes promises father's release upon the condition that she become 
his wife, which condition she indignantly rejects. 
Aenone, realizing the situation is overwhelmed. 

Aenone, on her knees, implores Cambes to name other conditions; he 
refuses: is inexorable. 

Her love for her father conquers her hatred for Cambes, and, in utter 
despair she submits. 

Aenone suddenlv calls to mind and threatens to disclose an infamous 
secret crime of his unless her father is released. Cambes is terror 
stricken. 

7. Cambes, sullen and perplexed, turns away, vainly seeking means of 
thwarting her purpose. Between hope and fear Aenone awaits. 

8. Cambes conquered Aenone victorious. 

9. A .'none turns and thanks the gods for deliverence. 



2. FREE GYMNASTICS- Swedish Day's Order. Illustrating phase 

cf daily lesson 

22 Young Women of Junior Class 

3. BAR BELLS - . Young Men of Middle Year Class 
4- FLAG EXERCISES • 32 Young Women of Middle Year Class 
AESTHETIC GYMNASTICS;— 

[a] Fancy steps and postures 

[/■J Pantomime. Illustrating an incident in Greek story See 

synopsis on 4th page. 
[c] Artistic Groupings • 18 Young Women of Senior Class 



6. ACROBATICS 



1 MARCH 1904 



Messrs. Hoopes, Fernandez, 
Lichty and Torres 




Dr. C.E. Ehinger, Physical Director at the 
West Chester State Normal School, has received 
letters from more than a dozen teachers of physi- 
cal culture, who are coming to West Chester on 
Friday night to attend the annual gymnastic en- 
tertainment. At present the students are rehears- 
ing every day, and the Gymnasium is given over 
to them, no others being allowed in the building. 
The reunion will be one of the largest in the his- 
tory of the school. 



March 1904 show 



74 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



5 MARCH 1904 



GRACE AND MUSCLE 
HAVE THEIR BIGHT. 

Poetry of Motion Rules in Normal 
Gymnasium- 



Dr. F.blncer's Boys and Girls Show What 
They Can Do in Class Work— Fine Au- 
dience Applauds Annnal Display. 

Last evening physical culture had Its 
turn at the West Chester State Normal 
School. It was the time of the annual 
gymnastic exhibition, when boys and 
girls from all the classes had their 
chance to step forward in costume and 
let their abilities be seen. 

With wands and clubs and dumb bells 
they went through the exercises in tine 
style, winning plaudits many, and filling 
the hearts of friends and parents with 
joy. 

The spectators differed widely from the 
audience of a lecture night. True, the 
Trustees were present, with Captain R. 
T. Cornwell, gray-haired and venerable, 
in one of the front rows, and Albert P. 
Hall, another veteran member, beside 
him. The members of the Faculty, too, 
were noticed, Dr. and Mrs. Philips hav- 
ing places at the fore, where they could 
have fi good view of all who entered the 
building. For the rest, however, the 
people were largely from out of town, 
farmers, business men. professional men 
and their wives, whose sons or daugh- 
ters were in the canvas slippered com- 
•pany in uniform on the main floor. And 
they were present in plenty, for trains 
and trolley cars do not run for naught 
on pleasant moonlight evenings. A 
sprinkling of West Chester people sat 
with the others. - 

Physical Directors from various schools 
and colleges came to see Dr. and Mrs. 
Ehinger and learn about the work in 
West Chester, which has become famous 
throughout the land. While the older 
portion of the spectators occupied seats 
at the south end of the main floor, the 
gallery or running track was filled to 
overflowing with a merry company of 
young couple, students past and present. 
who knew thoroughly the technique and 
led in the applause. 

Harry S. Johnson, the School Steward, 
was I n charge of the ushers, and looked 
after the door. Tickets were handled by 
Harvey M. Cooper and Francis H. Hall- 
man, and those who assisted in seating 
the audience were Oscar H. Campbell, 
Frank Wells, Leon Taylor and Matthew 
Black. 

BANNERS IN EVIDENCE. 

The Gymnasium was decorated as 
much as possible on an occasion when 
space is the chief requisite. A large 
American flag was draped from the gal- 
lery railing at one end of the room, wliile 
from the rafters in the /:entre were sus- 
pended a group of class banners, begin- 
ning with that of 1899. 

These relics of thi past were of varied 
colors and shapes, but served to recall 
to many visitors memories of past school 
days. 

The grav and purple of '90. the red and 
white of '03, the blue and white of 1900, 
the black and gold of '0i, mingled In a 
bright color scheme, while above them 
hung the crimson and red banner of 1901, 
with a small red and white flag. 

The first applause of the evening oc- 
curred when Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger, with 
the accompanist of the evening, Miss 
Margaret Griffith, crossed the floor. A 
few moments later to the stirring strains 
of a march a hundred and more little 
people from the middle and upper grades 
of the Model School marched in, led by 
the gymnasium assistant, Miss Towle, 
and with little Anna Miller bearing a 
crimson banner. Row after row of young 
folks filed In until it seemed as if the 
floor would hold no more. Then the mu- 
sic stopped and the children. In quick 
alert manner, went through a series of 
free gymnastics, suited to the school 
room. 



This was followed by several "games," 
In which bean bags tigured prominently, 
and in which the graceful motions and 
absence of self-consciousness on the part 
of these little folks made the exercises 
In which they took part among the most 
attractive of the evening. 

CUBANS DO WELL. 
A class of sixteen small boys, who call 
themselves the Juvenile Gym team, won 
enthusiastic applause for their work with 
long poles. More than half the class 
consisted of the younger Cuban boys, 
whose black eyes shown with interest as 
they went through the difficult evolutions 
with a precision that would be difficult 
to excel. 

Sixteen young women, led by Miss C|ar- 
oline Halsey, of the Senior Class, went 
through a series of German tactics, con- 
sisting of running, rapid marching, both 
forward and backward, quick turns, sud- 
den changes of movement. The young 
women, who were members of several 
classes, acquitted themselves well and 
were warmly applauded. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Ehinger, 
twenty young men of the Junior Class 
made their dumb bells clash in unison. 
Their red sweaters, bearing the numerals 
1906 in dark blue, gaze a neat appearance 
to the class. Before filing from the room 
the lads closed into a circle and from vig- 
orous lungs poured forth their class yell, 
the first of these vociferous bursts to be 
given. 

Work on the "buck" and springboard 
was taken up enthusiasticaly by the 
"Gym Team," a dozen young men wear- 
ing sleeveless black sweaters with orange 
shoulder belts, bearing the syllable "gym" 
in black letters. Under the skillful guid- 
ance of Trof. Llewellyn Hoopes their 
vaulting and tumbling brought down the 
house. Special applause was given Juan 
Geno, one of the Cuban lads, when with 
a long leap and a leap from the spring- 
board, he sprang clear over seven of his 
fellow classmen, lightly touching the 
shoulders only of the foremost as he went 
over. 

IN GREEN AND WHITE. 
Sixteen young men of the Senior 
Class, wearing white suits and small 
green neckties, carrying out the class 
colors in this way, were cordially wel- 
comed by the gallery when they entered, 
and during their exhibition of rapid 
marching received volley after volley of 
admiring applause. 

No sooner had these young men left 
the room than fourteen of them returned 
accompanied by ten of the young women 
of the class, with whom they Joined In 
an exhibition of fancy club swinging, led 
by both Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger. A feature 
of this work was that the movements 
were not uniform, the young men per- 
forming one series of evolutions, while 
the young women went through different 
motions. This made the exercises more 
difficult for the performers and more in- 
teresting to the lookers on. 

MEN OF MANY JOINTS. 
Work on the horizontal b.ir, oy four 
members of the "Gym Team," led by 
Prof. Hoopes, showed a number of new 
turns and twists, back somersaults and 
twirls through the air which made the 
spectators wonder whether the young men 
were not blessed with more than the 
ordinary number of Joints. 

Free gymnastics (Swedish Day's Order) 
illustrating phases of a daily lesson, were 
shown by twenty young women, under 
direction of Mrs. Ehinger. The girls were 
members of the Junior Class, and each 
wore a carnation of dark red and an- 
other of white, to mark her rank in the 
school. The running and hopping of these 
young ladles received especial applause. 
Armed with bar bells, twenty young 
men of the Middle Year class came next 
upon the scene and executed a number of 
Intricate movements with rapidity and ac- 
curacy, ending, as had been the rule of 
the evening, with their class yell. 
PATRIOTIC "MIDDLERS." 
The largest class of the evening, with 
the exception of that from the Model 
School, was the one composed of the Mid- 
dle Year girls, who gave a pretty flag 
exercise under Mrs. Ehlnger's direction. 
The line of March was led by Miss Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Jesse K. Cope, former- 
ly State Dairy and Food Commissioner. 

With a small flag in either hand the 
maidens made a pretty picture in their 
various poses, and the spectators showed 
their approval. As a finale to this exer- 
cise, the young men of the Junior Class, 



led by Miss Hardee, sang Columbia, tne 
Gem of the Ocean." while the patriotic 
maidens marched around their standard 
bearer, pausing at Intervals in effective 
tableaux. 

GRECIAN POSES. 
The concluding number of the class 
work consisted in aesthetic gymnastics 
by sixteen young women of the Senior 
Class. The maidens wore graceful Gre- 
cian robes, of white, bordered with "Wall 
of Troy" designs. Their hair was bound 
with fillets of white. 

The exercises opened with fancy steps 
and graceful postures, followed by a pan- 
tomime, the Greek play, "Aenone," In 
which the young heroine saves her 
father's life and thus avoids a sad des- 
tiny for herself by her courage and de- 
termination. Without a spoken word the 
young women enacted the play, showing 
by their gestures and artistic grouping 
the scenes which they desired to portray. 
The programme closed with acrobatics, 
in which Prof. Hoopes. Juan Fernandez. 
Mr. Lichty and Miguel Torres performed 
stunts which carried the spectators with 
them in admiring applause. 

OFFICIAL LISTS. 
The official lists of those taking part 
in the evening s programme are given 
herewith: 

Physical Directors who accepted invita- 
tions to be present: Dr. Grace E. Spie- 
gle, Girls' Normal School, Philadelphia; 
Dr. Jas. A. Babbitt. Haverford College; 
Miss Elizabeth Bates, Mr. Wm. Burdlck, 
Swarthmore College; Miss Mary Wollas- 
ton. Swarthmore Prep. School; Prof. J. 
P. Ryder, Drexel Institute, Philadelphia; 
Mr. F. A. Finkeldey, Glrard College, Phil- 
adelphia; Miss Emily Smedley, Westtown 
Boarding School; Miss Elizabeth Holmes, 
Moorestown, N. J.; Miss Linda Haines. 
Malvern, Pa.; Miss Anna Lilley, Lans- 
downe; Mr. E. Meanwell, Glen Mills; 
Mrs. Kercher, Temple College. Philadel- 
phia; Mrs F. A. Williams, Philadelphia; 
Mrs. Joseph Hemphill, Jr., West Chester. 
Senior Club Girls— Laura Buck, Beatrice 
Blakslee, Charlotte Fletcher, Prlscllla 
Garrett, Mabel Gates, Caroline Halsey, 
Grace Kiefer, Clara Mattls, Helen Mor- 
ris. Clara Neeman, Mattie Smith, Addle 
Weber. 

German Tactics— Caroline Halsey, Fran- 
ces Schuyler, Clara Davis, Helen White. 
Joanna Reeves, Sara Philips, Mary Fencll, 
Esther Kratz, Elsie Headley, Mabel Ed- 
wards, Rebecca Massey. Helen Hicks, 
Belle Loy, Grace Cochran, Elvira John- 
son, Kathryn Murphey, Florence Town- 
send, Laura Bruce, Dorothy Schmucker. 
Junior Girls— May Ake. Cornelia Brit- 
tlngham, Lillian Brunner, Grace Coch- 
ran. Beatrice Clark. Edith Cowan, Anna 
Funk, Anna Glenn, Mabel Hayman, Hazel 
Huey, Elvira Johnson, Bertha Jones, Ed- 
na Louder, Jennie Mahan, Mary Miller, 
Florence Myers, Sura Sharp, Belle Scott, 
Mary Sahler, CarrTe Tressler, Esther Tag- 
gart, Ethel Wright. 

Middle Year Girls— Edna Baldwin. Edna 
Barden. Bessie Cooper. Adele Caley, Eliz- 
abeth Gope, Edna Calflisch, Lettie Dan- 
nenhower, Helen Dengler. Mary England, 
Anna .Few. Grace Grlswold. Elsie Head- 
ley, Rhea Murphey, Elizabeth North, 
Mary Philips, Sara Philips, Mary Rogers, 
Florida Smith, Ethel Slpple, Helen 
Sheets. Mary Sharp. Jessie Sharp, Kath- 
erlne Strausse, Elsie Speakman, Aiilla 
Starkey, Adah Smith. Elda Shoemaker, 
Helen White. Nellie Wilson, Eva Walt, 
Retta Wallace, Mary Webb. 

Aesthetic Gymnastics — Frances Asprll, 
Mary Allchln, Beatrice Blakslee. Mary 
Carroll, Lela Carey, Mabel Edwards, An- 
na Endicott, Katharine Fleming, Char- 
lotte Fletcher, Priscilla Garrett, Helen 
Jrey, Elizabeth Kerwin. Mary Lough- 
ridge, Alice Moore, Bertha McCausland, 
Clara Mattls, Clara Neeman, Iva Warner. 
Middle Year Boys, with bar bells— J. K. 
Bechfel, Jesse K. Cope, Horace N. Davis, 
Clyde C. Dengler, Herbert Detwller, John 
M. Fry, Thomas Griffiths. Belvln Gifford, 
John T. Gyger, J. H. Kramer. Thomas 
Monahan. Claude Reading. G. K. Schlot- 
terer. Samuel Shanaman, Elvln R. Sou- 
der, Morris Stler, John F. Stlne, J. T. 
Taylor, Samuel WIckersham, H. J. Wil- 
liams, Aaron Willour. 

Junior Boys, with dumb bells— Herbert 
Bate, Lewis Brlnton, . John. Bverlv. Wm. 
A. Cannon, Juan Fernandez, George Gay- 
man. Raymond Haln. Albert Hanby, Ed- 
gar Howell. J. A. Krall, Herbert Moly- 
neaux. H. Clavton Moyer, Horace Pyle, 
J. M. Stevenson, John L. Stlnson. Chester 
Witmer. Mortimer Whitehead. Arthur 
Connard. R. K. Denworth. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 75 



Juvenile Class, poles — Juan Bothe, Clar- 
ence Carey, Marshall Cochran, "Win. Dar- 
lington, Roscoe Davis, Eugene Ferron. 
Arthur Hammond. Irey Holman, Sixto 
Mcstros. Walton Mussen, Milton Oldfield. 
Fernandez Penabaz, Florentlno Plna, 
Haul Flna, Sergio Seurez, Clarence Shenk, 
Miguel Torres, Rohert Walker, Harry 
Carey. Robert Rogers. 

Senior Class, marching and Indian clubs 
— D. Edward Atwell. Allen G. Beekley, 
Paul Gayman, Ralph Johnson, Ashmore 
Johnson. J. Banks I>ahr. Geo. W. Lich- 
tenberger, R. M. McCrone. Henderson 
Mendenhall. Alvin Mover, Adolf Norstedt, 
Geo. H. Stlllwagon. Chester A. Stiteler. 
JCdgar J. Williams, Frank Woolson, Rollo 
Young. 

Gym. Team, buck and horizontal— Philip 

Dunn, Juan Fernandez. Fox, Juan 

Geno. Arthur Lichty, Marshall Martin. 
Herbert Mathers. Luther Plersol. Raul 
P»na, Wm. Pollock, John Williams. En- 
rique Vila. • 

Tumbling— Juan Fernandez. Arthur 
Lichty, "Mike" Torres, L. L. Hoopes. 

"AMULET" MARCH 1904 

The annual gymnasium exhibition held 
in the Normal gym on March 4th was a 
success in every respect. The work done 
by the various classes showed careful pre- 
paration on the part of both students and 
instructors. Their efforts were rewarded 
by the presence of the largest crowd of 
visitors ever in the gymnasium at one 
time. 

Among the many features of the even- 
ing was the "Flag Exercises," by the Mid- 
dle Year girls, and several original ma- 
neuvers which have recently been .devel- 
oped in the Senior Clas= oy Dr. Ehinger. 
PROGRAM. 

PART I. 

1. (a) Schoolroom Free Gymnastics 

(b) Games, Middle and Upper Grade Pupils 

of Model School. 

2. Long Poles Boys' Juvenile Class 

3. German Tactics. .Class of 11 Young Women 

4. Dumb Bells Junior Young Men 

5. Buck and Spring Board Vaulting. 

, "Gym" Team 

6. (a) Marching, 16 Y'oung Men of Senior Class 
(b) Club Swinging and Postures, 

"..'...-.... 24 Young Men of Senror Class 

PART 11. 

1. Horizontal Bar "Gym" Team 

2. Free Gymnastics — Swedish Day's Order, 

(Illustrating phase of daily lesson.) 

22 Young'Women of Junior Class 

3. Bar Bells.. Young Men of Middle Year Class 

4. Flag Exercises, 

22 Young Women of Middle Year Class 

5. Aesthetic Gymnastics: — 

(a) Fancy Steps and Postures 

(b) Pantomime. (Illustrating an incident in 

Greek story) 

(c) Artistic Groupings. 

18 Young Women of Senior Class 

6. Acrobatics, Messrs. Hoopes, Fernandez, 

Lichty and Torres. 






,1 \utfflHMnfflHHI 


l M&t^UM i ▼■ : w #• 








f f ^ 



1904 Gym team 




March 1904 Senior Indian Clubs 




1904 W.C.N girls gymnasts 



r^ 




■ 



1904 W.C.S.N.S girls gymnasts 



76 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



ANNUAL 
PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION 

OF THE WORK 



of the 



Physical Training Department 



State Normal School 
West Chester, Pa. 



PART I 

I. MARCHING AND FANCY STEPS 

16 Young Women from Sub-Junior Grades 



2. DUMB BELLS 

3. SWEDISH DAY'S ORDER 
[a~\ Free Gymnastics 
[/>'] Apparatus Work 

4. MARCHING 



Young Men of Junior Class 



26 Young Women of Junior Class 



Young Men of Senior Class 



5. 

Friday Eve'g, March 3rd, 1905 

at 7.30 O'clock ■ 
PART II 

1. [a] COMBINATION EXERCISES WITH POLES AND RINGS 

[b] FANCY STEPS 26 Young Women of Middle Year Class 

2. BAR BELLS . • Young Men of Middle Year Class 

3. CLUB SWINGING 

40 Young Women and Young Men of Senior Class 

4. FLYING RINGS . "Gym" Team 

5. AESTHETIC GYMNASTICS— 

[,r] Posture Dance 

[b] Posture Groupings . 19 Young Women of Senior Class 

Synopsis: See 4th Page 

....GYMNASTIC ENTERTAINMENT.... 

YOUNG LADIES AND YOUNG MEN 

GYMNASIUM OF 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

FRIDAY EVE'G, MARCH 3, '05 

AT SEVEN THIRTY O'CLOCK 
GENERAL ADMISSION - - 35 CENTS 



PARALLEL BARS . . . "Gym" Team 

SYNOPSIS OF AESTHETIC GYMNASTICS. 

THE SCULPTOR'S DREAM. 

PI. AC!: : Sculptor's Studio. 

Tl.ME : Warm Summer Afternoon. 

Enter five young ladies who take their places on pedestals and pose. 
representing in irbles awaiting the finishing touches of the master. Enter 
Sculptor who, laying aside his street garb, dons his working parapherna- 
lia an.J prepares to res-me his carving. Feeling warm and drowsy he 
abandons his work and throws himself upon the couch for an afternoon 
nap. 

In his dream he is amazed to hear soft music and see his casts and 
marbles descend from their pedestals, assure themselves that he is asleep, 
and then, joined by others who mysteriously appear, move through the 
mazes of a slow rhythmic dance ; finally taking their places on pedestals 
.\nS assuming postures and groups entirely unfamiliar to him, changing 
liom one form to another silently * * * * 

1 he distant cathedral chimes strike the hour of three, the Sculptor is 
aroused and the dream tonus vanish. Starting up bewildered, he quicklv 
gazes around and seeing his statues standing as before, reali/es that he 
has been dreaming. 

Wit'n the vision siiii dominating his thoughts lie leaves the studio, 
a i .! ill.- Illllllhel closes. 

25 FEBRUARY 1905 

Annual 
Public Demonstration 

OF.THE PHYSICAL TRAINING 

DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST 

CHESTER STATE NORMAL 

SCHOOL, iff" r ' > r « 

!By the Young Ladles and Young Men, 
illustrating the Gymnastic Work 1b ail 
Its phases. 

f Exhibitions In Free Gymnastics, also 
.■with Dumb Bells, Bar Bells and Clubs. 
(Exercises on the Flying Rings and Par r 
el lei Bars, Pyramid Building-, Movements' 
ton Balancing Beams and Jumping, 
Fancy Dancing;, Aesthetic Exercises 1r 
Costume. ' ' '. 

iFriday Ev'g, JVlarcli 3d, 

7.30 O'CLOCK. 
General Admission 4 ............ 35 cents J 

Reserved Seats ■ f»0 cents j 

Children „ ..15 cents] 

' Tickets and Reserved Seat Chart at J 
Rupert's, commencing Tuesday mornlne.'* 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 77 




Dr. Ehinger's New Home — Ceredo and Rosedale Avenues 



A 




Pennsylvanis National Guard Calvary Show at the start of a Normal Baseball Game 



78 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



4 MARCH 1905 



"GYM" STUDENTS 
GIVE TO ANNUAL 

Dr. Ehinger's Boys and Girls Entertain 
Many Friends. 



Many Young People Take Part, and 

Parents and Friends Look. On, 

Well Pleased — Some of 

the Guests.' 

Last evening the gymnasium at ; the 
West Chester State Normal School 
was packed with students and their 
friends. Everybody was well pleased 
with the annual entertainment given by 
the young people. *\ — M 

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ehlngef, wh» have 
been In charge of the gymnasium for a 
dozen years and more, knew just how to 
arrange the programme so that It would 
be appreciated, and In addition to this 
many of the students of other years came 
back to West- Chester to Join their old 
friends and see how the work progressed. 
One of the unexpected guests who drop- 
ped In at the eleventh hour, but was 
none-the less welcomed, was L. Llewellyn 
Hoopes, former assistant In the gymnasi- 
um, and at present In charge of the gym- 
nastic work at the University of Virginia, 
where he is taking a medical course. He 
had thought he could not come, but at 
the last moment broke away and made 
the journey, preferring this to the Inau- 
guration In Washington, D. C. a city 
he passed through on his way North. 

The spectators began arriving when the 
night was young, for the programme 
was announced to begin at 7.30, and peo- 
ple kept on until late. Trolley cars kept 
bringing them In dozens and scores, un- 
til the building would hold no more. The 
ushers had the time of their lives trying 
to provide seats for everybody. 

Tickets were taken at the door by Har- 
vey M. Cooper and Francis H. Hallmftn, 
and the ushers were: Philip Dunn, Oscar 
Campbell, Ernest Wood, John Williams, 
FlorentlnaPina, Miguel Tores, William 
Herr, Fred Talbot. 

Accompaniments during the evening 
were played by Miss Margaret Griffith, 
whose skill at the piano Is well recog- 
nized. 

, It was generally agreed that the general 
appearance of the students was never bet- 
ter, that the drills were perfect In their 
detail, that the costumes, were all most 
becoming, and that the work as a while 
was highly creditable. 

First came a party of sixteen young 
women from the sub-Junior Class, wear- 
ing white waists .large yellow bow ties 
and dark skirts. They gave a series of 
fancy steps, under direction of Miss 
Christiansen, assistant to Mrs. Ehlnger. 

Following them were twenty-four juni- 
or boys, with dumbbells, the boys wearing 
red sweaters, lettered "W. C," and gray 
pantaloons. They were drilled by Dr. 
Ehlnger. The movements were very en- 
ergetic, some of them suggesting the 
James Corbett style of art, but as no 
blows were struck, the crowd applauded 
the menacing gestures, as well as sortie of 
a more peaceful character. Before leav- 
ing the floor the boys gave their yell, 
•with its "'97, rah! rah! rah!" in a most 
enthusiastic way. ' 

Twenty-six young women of the same 
'class appeared next. They wore white 
waists, dark gymnasium skirts and small 
^C-t.-Y. *J*s. Tb**y £nve iiit\ "Sweden li^v^ 
Order," consisting of free gymnastics and 
apparatus work, In a pleasing way. In 
the fancy steps their twinkling feet, in 
glistening black slippers, were watched 
with great Interest, by the people. By 
using tne vaulting buck, -the , walking 
tracks and the Jumping spring tjoard all 
at the same time, followed by a kind of 
foot race, the class made a pretty break 
In the programme. This they followed 
with a march in which waltz steps were 
Included. 



The Senior Doys, wearing white suits 
and black belts, came next, twentyTSix In 
number, and gave a drill. 

Part first ended with 'work on the 
parallel bars by the gym team of eighteen 
members, under direction of Carl Hier- 
holtzer, assistant to Dr. Ehinger. The 
young men wore bike suits and yellow 
sashes, the sashes bearing blue letters 
"Gym." Several of the actors did excep- 
tionally good work, and ail with a finish 
that reflected much credit upon their In- 
structor. The closing feature was a fine 
pyramid about twenty feet high. 

Thirty young women of the Middle- 
Tear Class, directed by Mrs. Ehlnger, 
opened the second part of the programme 
by appearing in white waists and dark 
gymnasium skirts, with a series of com- 
bination exercises with poles and rings, 
and fancy steps. Their handsome new 
banner was carried for the first time. 

When the young women had passed out, 
their places were gracefully taken by 
twenty young men of the same class, 
carrying bar bells, and giving a well-ex- 
ecuted drill. As the class left the floor 
a handsome bouquet was handed to Dr. 
Ehlnger. ' 

Forty Seniors, with clubs, gave an ex- 
hibition of their skill, swinging the clubs 
with the air of veterans, keeping accurate 
time and doing their work most grace- 
fully.. They closed by forming a circle 
nhnut their banner and giving their class 
yell, as the previous classes had done. 
PROGRAMME. 
Part.l.— 1. Marching and fancy steps, 
'slxteerr"y6ung"*'wdmen ' frorifSub-JUnlbr' 
grades. 2. Dumb bells, young uien of 
Junior Class. 3. Swedish- Day's Order,, 
(a) free gymnastics; (b) apparatus work,) 
twenty-six young women of Junior Clcss^ 
4. Marching, young men of Senior Class. 
6. Parallel bars, "Gym" team. 

Part II.— 1. (a) Combination exercises, 
with poles and rings; (b) fancy steps.; 
twenty-six young women of Middle 5 car^ 
Class 2. Bar bells, young men of Mid- 
dle Year Class. 3. Club swinging, forty, 
voung women and young men of Senior, 
Class. 4. Flying rings, "Gym" team., 
6 Aesthetic gymnastics, (a) posture; 
dance; (b) posture groupings, nineteen, 
young women of Senior Class. j 

The "Gvm" team gave a performance, 
on the flying rings, several daring feats 
being undertaken and accomplished with, 
success, and all in a manner showing the 
development of the team rather than 
•any special person." Mr. Hlerhrritzer led 
the young men In this most skillfully. 
With a series of pyramids they made-itheir 
final bow. 

SCULPTOR'S DREAM. 
In aesthetic gymnastics, a company of 
voung women from the Senior" Class gave 
the final number on the evening's pro- 
gramme. Thev were in Greek costumes, 
which looked becoming and at the same 
time artistic. The little pantomlne they 
enacted, "A Sculptor's Dream," was ad- 
mirably done in this wise: 
Place— Sculptor's studio. 
Time— Warm summer afternoon. 
Enter live voung ladles who take their 
places on pedestals and pose, represent- 
ing marbles awaiting the finishing tout hes 
of the master. Enter sculptor who, lay- 
in? aside his street garb, dons his work- 
ing paraphernalia and prepares to resume 
hi* carving. Feeling warm and drowsy 
'he abandons his work and throws him- 
self upon the couch for an afternoon nap. 
In his dream he is amazed to hear 
soft music and see his casts and marbles 
(descend from their pedestals, assure 
themselves that he is asleep, and then, 
I joined by others who mysteriously appear, 
; move through the mazes of a. >slow 
rhythmic dance; finally taking their 
places on pedestals and assuming postures 
and groups entirely unfamiliar to him, 
changing from one form to another silent- 
ly • • • 

The distant cathedral chimes strike the 
hour of three, the sculptor Is aroused 
and the dream forms vanish. Starting up 
bewildered, he quickly gazes around and 
seeing his statues standing as before, 
'realizes that he has been dreaming. ■ 

With the visiqn still dominating his 
thoughts he leaves the studio. 



A FEW NAMES. 
Here are some of the names of visitors 
and those taking part: „„^_n,- 

Physical Directors in attendance— pi . 
H S Wingert. Temple College, Philadel- 
phia; Miss Andrews, Drexel Institute. 
Philadelphia; Miss Mabel Cherry, Com- 
mercial lHgh School. Philadelphia; Miss 
Lunette Galrock, Bryn Mawr College 
Miss Bishop. Bryn Mawr College; Miss 
Hamilton? St. Paul's Guild, Chester; Miss 
Mary Wollaston, Swarthmore Prepara- 
tory School; Miss Emily Smedley, V> est- 
tawn Boarding - School; Miss Alice C. 
Hartley, Darlington Seminary, ^ est 
Chester- Dr. J. V. Reel. Coatesville; Miss 
Adele Adams. Philadelphia Friends i Se- 
lect School ;Mr. E. Meauwell. Glen Mills. 
Wm Burdick. P. R. R. Y. M. C. A.. Phil- 
adelphia; Dr.' Jos. A. Babbitt, Harford 
College; Mr. Chester Ash, Y. M. C. A., 
CoateWille; Miss M. E. Bates, Swarth- 
more College: Llewellyn Hoopes, Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 

V Senior Girls in Clubs-Miss Retta \\al- 
lace. banner bearer; Rena Key lor, Helen 
White Adele Caley. Adele Ethel Mac- 
Mullen, Alice Windle. Elizabeth Cope, 
Caroline Brown, Helen Hand, Mary Eng- 
land Elsie Burnley. Edith Blakey, Helen 
Dengler. Edna Barden, Anna Few, Jean. 
Speakman. Helen Sheets, Sara Philips, 

M MWme Y Ye k a < r S - Class (poles, rings)-Mlss 
May Ake. Anna Baker, Rosa Brighton, 
Isabel Byrne, Lillian Bruyner. Grace 
Cochran. Beatrice Clark, Millie Clark 
Oliver Douglas. Emma Davis Clara 
Davis, Violet Evans, Sara Given, Elsl- 
nore Giddlngs. Tacie Heston. Florence 
KeDner Annie Ledenham, Mary B. Mil-. 
*r Mary Bates Miller, Cora Moore. 
Florence Rodenboh. Marion Sharpless 
Susie Tyson. Helen Whitney, Ethel 

W j r unllof Class, free (^nasties-Mabel 
Achey. Edith Cowan.- Emma Cloud, 
Marian Deane, Anna Glenn. Hazel Huey. 
Anna Hastell, Helen Hicks, Anna Hill, 
Susie Irwin, Elvira Johnson, Mabel 
Jaquette Anna Krauser, Bertha Kur- 
rath, Elizabeth Lingbrldge. Mabel Math- 
ers Florence Machonachy. Mary Nicho- 
las Edna Pollock, Elizabeth Scott Ada 
Shor'tlldge, Anna Singles. Sophia Steese, 
Dorothy Schmucker. Maud Taylor. Clara 

^Sub-Junior Class, marching and fancy 
stens)— Ruth Anderson, Abigail Fall, 
Marian Beckel, Adella Becker,^ Annie 
Crouch. Eleanor Gervin, Anna Krauser, 
Llda Lindale, Helen McClossey, Canle 
Mercer Mary Marsh, Isabel Ravenscroft, 
OUvl Thompson, Maud Taylor, Nellie 

^Fanc^'marchlng. also in club swinging 
with girls" Senior Class-Hugh W. Alger, 
Norman Bally, J. R. Bechtel, Jesse K. 
Com™ Horace Davis, R. Le Roy Dengler. 
Herbert Detwiler. Earl Dlehm. John M. 
Fry, G. Belvln Glfford, Thomas Griffiths 
John T Gvger, J. H. Kramer. Thomas 
Monahan George K Schlotterer, Samuel 
Shanaman. Elvln B Souder V^a.ter 
Steckbeck. Morris Stler. John Stine, 
Frank P. Walter. Aaron WJ»ower. 
Samuel Wlckersham, Danl. Williams, 
Haves Williams, Warren Yerger. 

Bar Bells. Middle Year Class-Lawrence 
W Amos. Harry M. Brown. John S. Byer- 
lv Arthur B. Conard, Raymond Den- 
worth Philip Dunn. Wm. S. Hagenbuch, 
Albert T Hanky, Reed Henderson, John 
B Kanagv, Herbert Mathers, H. Clay- 
ton Moyer, Jesse S. Parsons .Horace R.. 
p vie Harry Rosenberger, Edgar Rufe, 
Beale Schmucker. John L. Sthison Mor- 
timer Whitehead .Chester A. Wt«. H 
D Evans, Arthur Walton, Herbert l.e 
Van, J. Lawrence Geist. 

Dumb Bells; Junior Class-Robt Alex- 
ander Walter S. Crouse, Robt. Curtln, 
wl r nnaD J. Russell Pross. Geo. 
Suth Edw "r IB Wells, Howard Wollas- 
f„fClin R..*hv. W. A. Plumtey, 
Vincent' Coover, Warren ' Pelrce ^a™; 
cTsse" Howard Wlckert .Rafael Acosta. 
trirmo Boya. .Joaquin Vila, Emlllo \ ei- 
Tsquez, Rein Freed, - Joe. Butler, Fran- 

Cl Flyl"g e Rfn|s and Parallel Bars Normal 
Gvm Team-John L. Stlnson. Rein Freed, 
Fr^cisco L Herrera. William "? Ren " 
nich Raul Pina. Arthur Conard, Claude 
Butt.' Irev Holraan. William JSrb. Joseph 
R^tler Herbert Mathers. Joaquin V.la, 
Domtngo Panalni, G. Belvln Glfford, Ccrl 
O. Hlerholzer, Chas. Henry. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 79 



SOME GY MNASIU M NOTES. 

Dr. C. E. Ehinger, physical director of 
the Normal School, save a very Inter- 
esting talk and instructed in club swing- 
ing at the annual State Convention of 
Y. M. C. A. physical directors held at 
the Central Branch of the Y. M. C. A., 
Fifteenth and Chestnut streets, Phila- 
delphia, on June 10th. 

Prof. Charles B. Lewis, the popular 
athletic director of Allegheny College, 
who for several years was the assistant 
eymnast at the Normal, spent a couple 
of days at the school during commence- 
ment week seeing old friends. 

The number of ' former assistants and.': 
students In the gymnasium of the. West! 
Chester State Normal School who havaj 
themselves become prominent as lnstruo-5 
tors in physical culture is remarkable/? 
Among the former assistants here are:— : 
} Ott<i F. Monahan, now gymnasium and 
athletic director of the Hotchklss. School, 
[Connecticut. . * ■ " 

I Carl L, Schraeder. ^former director o£ 
tthe gymnasium at the Geneseo State Nor-l 
,mal School. New York, and now assist- 
ant director of the Hemenway ■ Oym- 
tnaslum at Harvard University and In the! 
j Sargent Normal School of Gymnastics. \ 
Charles B Lewis, formerly director of 
the gymnasium at Allegheny College, Pa.r| 
and now holding the same position _at< 
J.Tufts Collec. Mass. ' A 

u Llewellyn Hoopes, director of the gym*. 
nnsi'ini at Geneseo. State Normal School., 
' N. Y. .■•>. 

Elizabeth H.' Holmes. Instructor at th,aa 
University of Missouri. 

Emily Smedley. Instructor In gym*- 
uastlcs at the Westtown Boarding School. 
Florence Towle, Instructor In the gym- 
nasium at the Plattsburg State Normal' 
School. N. Y. 

Alice M. Christiansen, Instructor In the 
Oneonta State Normal School, N. Y. 

The following students who did special 
work In gymnastics here are now teach- 
ing this subject:— 

Maud Mnrch, In the Teachers' College, 
Columbia University, New York. , 

Gertrude Jacobs, In the public schools 
of New York City. 

Caroline Wollaston, in the Girls' High 
School, Brooklyn. N. Y. ' / 

Anna R. Hughes; In the Friends' 
School. Washington, D. C. 

Mary C. GrifUth.ln Mills College, Cali- 
fornia, V 
M'ibel Mearns. in Wilson . College, 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

• Mary Wollaston, In the Swarthmore 
Preparatory School, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Zay Engle, In the State Normal School 
at Hyannls, Mass. 

Edith S. Paschall, In the New Britain 
State Normal Training | School, South 
Manchester. Conn. 

Anna S Cressman. at Perklomen Semi- 
nary, Pennsburg. Pa. 

D. B. Longacre, at the Cheltenham 
Academy, Cheltenham, Pa, 

Harvey M. Cooper, at the Swarthmora 
Preparatory School, Swarthmore, Pa, i 
Amy S. Wells, In the public schopls at 
Ardmore, Pa- 



t. .„. , A FEW VISITORS. 

•Among fhe vfeitore^were a number of 

&5SE- JSJSXSL «$2F 7™%& 

i, e hi=- J » , t? enl } Carter School, Philadel- 
?titnV« A r£=5 ^ ?«|sell, Pennsylvania In, 
o'lVL r- De 5 f and Dumb. Mt. Airy; Dr. 
« u rt 'sC- Eaves. George School, Pa.; Dr. 
wm. Burdick. Pennsylvania R R Y M 
C. A, Philadelphia; Miss Isabel F. Walk^ 
"'•■George School, Pa.: Socncor M. Ben-" 



?f U T»"S us< U or " e f"«, Glcn'MlllsT r 
c >. D ,- ^i" P""a»". Y. M. C. A. Training 
School. Springfield. Mass.; Miss Marlon 
Tm./^T' D l ex £ l r Institute. Philadelphia;. 
Miss Mary A. Wollaston. Swarthmore Pre^ 
paratory School, Swarthmore, Pa.-.Har-! 
£*„ i Co 2 per '.; Swa rthmore Preparatory 
bchool, Swarthmore. Pa.; Miss Anna P, 
Cressman, Perkiomen Seminary, Penns* 
burg, Pa.; Dr. Ida . V. Reel. Coatesvllle; 
?i a " Mis ^, An , na , B - Lin >'' Lansdowne, Pa- 
Miss EmlyC. Smedley, Westtown Board- 
ing School. Westtown. Pa.; Miss Margaret 
Rtfnmlngton, Girls' High School. Phila- 
delphia; Miss lone Dysert, Media, Pa : 
Miss Amy Wells, Supervisor Physical 
, Training, Ardmore Public schools; Miss 
Flora L Stevens, Bye's Seminary, West 
Chester Miss Bessie Thomas, physical di- 
rector. Gay street school. West Chester; 
J. Chauncey Shortledge, Shortledge Acad-, 
emy. Ward, Pa. 




March 1905 show 



80 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



Annual 
fubltr SttttottHtHttum 

of thr Work 

nf thr 

•piystral ©raining Brpartmrnt 

§tatr Nnrmal ^rhnnl 
Urst (Ehrstrr, Prima. 

iFri&ag Stinting, iHarrl) 2, 'Hfi 

at r.-lH n'rhuk 

PART II 
I. Club Swinging. 16 Young Women and 16 Young Men qf Senior Class 

32 Young; Women of Middle Year Class 



2. Dumb Bells 

3. Buck Vaulting' 

4. Marching - 

5. Aesthetic Gymnastics 

|ir| Fancy Steps. Polka Mazurka 
I A| Posture Grouping 



'Gym'" Team 



Young Men qf Senior Class 



16 Young Women qf Senior Class 



6. Acrobatics 



"Tumbling'' Team 



4 MAY 1906 



Normal Girls to Dance. 

To-morrow afternoon the senior prome- 
nade (riven by the mlddlers and Juniors, 
will occur In the Normal School Gym- 
noMum. at two o'clock. The young wo- 
men of the school have been giving th%^e 
dancet for some years, and they expect 
that to-morrow to be one of the most 
pleasant of all. The patronesses are: 
Mrs. G. M. Philips. Mrs. C. B. Cochran. 
Mrs. 8. C. Schmucker. Mrs. Wallace P. 
Dick, Mrs. C. E. Ehlnger, Mrs. Bird T. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Henry H. Goddard, Mr» 
David M. Sensenlg. The class rr.otto ap- 
pear* on the programme, "Hono- Lies In 
i Honest TolL" 



yrnunun 

¥ * * 

PART I 

I. |,i| Free Gymnastics. Swedish Da-ys Order 
|/>| Game "Bird Catcher'' 



2. Dumb Bells 

3. |,;| Swedish Day's Order 
\h\ Fancy Steps 

4. Bar Bells 



3d and 4th Grades Model School 
Young Men of Junior Class 

20 Young Women of Junior Class 
Young Men of Middle Year Cla.ss 



5. |,<] Marching 

|/.| Old Swedish Folk Dances: Klappdans. Oxdansen. 

Varsovienne - 16 Young- Women of Sub-Junior Grades 



6. Horizontal Bars 



S,,.' iml 1 l'"" II' '"'•!•■ •'•"'<•<"'"•/ li-""<-«» «'»' Inii'is. 



Gym'' Team 



Special c-r will LEAVE SCHOOL at 10 • '■ lock, 
connecting with errs for Downingtown and Kc-nnett 

Square. 

Train for Philadelphia and way stations, via Central 
Division, leaves Mar <et street station at 10.35 p. m. 

Train for Philadelphia and way stations on Pennsylva- 
nia Main Line, via Frazer, leaves at 10.57 P- m. 

Trolleys for Philadelphia leave Gay and High streets 
at fifteen minutes before and after the hour. 

The program will be completed before the cars leave school. 



ANNUAL PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION; 

Department Phyiical Training 

• it . "gymnasium of _ 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

§r 'Evening. March 2nd, 1905 

A* 7.30 O'CLOCK ~ .-.• .; ' 

jftAL ADMISSION - - 3 5 CENTS 




DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 81 



3 MARCH 1906 



r- i.ast evenmg the physical culture de- 
railment of tho State Normal School 
showed tho result of the seasons work In 
Its annual gymnasium exhibit. Attend- 
ance was large, the audience tilling every 
reat.'and many persons being obliged to 
plartri during the performance. Among 
the guests were former students, some 
;of whom are now teaching gymnastics, 
directors of .physical departments In other 
Bchools. and friends and relatives of the 
Students. "^.3 

I The programme was a vane'done. but 
*aen number was given with intelligence 
titid finish of_ execution. Many congratu- 
Jations wero extended to Dr. and Mrs 
jEhtngcr and their assistants. Miss Agnes 
Thompson and Carl Hierholzcr. for the 
May tn which the work was done by those 
fwhom they have had In training. Bou- 
tjuets given by various classes to these 
trainers and to Miss Margaret Griffith, 
■who assltcd by Miss Thompson, officiated 
Pt the piano during the evening, gave a 
rtWuch ot onght coior to me oeene'Ss. mey" 
Jay heaped upon the piano. 
J Class banners from that of 1900 hung in 
effective grouping above the centre of the 
.floor and a large American flag was drap- 
ed- beneath the gallery at the north side 
!of the- room. . In the gallery the students 
(were 'massed, an enthusiastic portion of. 
itlae audience.* applauding their class- 
(mates and losing not a motion on the 
(floor. Cheering and class yells were not 
>heard. however, except as the represen- 
tatives of the classes drew together at 
; th<; conclusion of each exhibit and gave 
'rent to their feelings in their own pax- 
'tloular yell. . i: ■■■'-■<■ 

L.. . . LITTLE ONES FIRST, 
p Before the audience realized what was 
feeing on the little people of the third and 
fourth grades of the Model ^chool answer- 
ed' the signal from their leader. Miss 
'Thompson, and with a sudden patter of 
'running feet had taken their places on the 
floor.- Promptly following the directions 
tlhey went through a series of free gym-' 
tinstlcs. of the •'Swedish Days Order.''! 
.The sight was a prettv one, the little girls - 
bright hair ribbons and the varied colors 
of their dresses * blending harmoniously, 
•while the earnest little faces, eager mo- 
tions, all accurately timed to prompt 
jibedienee, were Interesting to watch. A 
pretty game, "Bird Catcher," was played 
to illustrate the way in which fun and 
• raining are blended. Several children 
were chosen as "catchers," and each row 
'Was given the "name of some bird, ' as 
"robin," "oriole." "blackbird," etc. At the 
signal each row in turn "flew," the 
"birds" scattering in different directions, 
while the catchers dashed after them. 
JSverv "bird" touched by the catcher was 
i. bilged to step aside and remain In a 
jrroup till the end of the game, when all 
marched to their places in time to the 
music. The "catchers" were: David Mc- 
Farland, Katherine Brook and Walter 
Wright. Clara Kerwin was the "mother 
fcird," who defended the flock. . 

.READY JUNIORS. . 
Seventeen young men of the Junior 
Class wer^ received with enthusiasm .when 
they came upon the floor.~wearlng~a~uW^" 
form of red sweaters and gray trousers. 
Each carried a pair of dumb bells and in 
B finished manner went through a series 
of evolutions, several of which were quite 
rompllcaled. The feat of falling flat on 
the signal and recovering an upright posi- 
tion, just as quickly was warmly applaud- 
ed, 

■ Twenty-seven women of the Junior 
Class, wearing white shirtwaists, black 
bloomers and black neckties, went through 
a. series of free gymnastics, followed by 
fancy steps, which were graceful and in- 
teresting in their variety. In this latter, 
exercise was included vaulting over the 
buck and horizontal bar. ' 

The work with bar bells of the young 
men representing the middle-year class 
was excellently done and much applauded. 
The young men worked promptly and in 
Unison, handling the long and unwieldly 
bars with much dexterity. At tho con- 
clusion of the exercise, when drawn up 
in a. circle, a large bouquet of white car- 
naaions was presented iur. and Mrs. Dr. 
Khlnger on behalf of the class of 1907. 



J.N SWEDISH DANCES. 

A novel and interesting feature of the 
programme was the execution of two old 
Swedish iolk dances, the "Klappdans," 
R.nd the "Oxdausen." by sixteen young 
."women of the sub-junior class. 

Two and two the girls passed around 
the room, keeping time to the music with 
a soft stamp of feet. In the second of 
the dances, - rhythmic hand clapping 
marked the time, while quaint figures 
were executed in a way which would 
nuggest that the Swedes of early days 
pot far more exercise out of their danc- 
ing than fashionable society of to-day 
Hoes. Mrs. Ehinger directed these 
dances. I 

' ■' - " ' FINE TEAM WORK. 

The "Gym" Team work on the hori- 
oontai bar was received with enthusiasm. 
Led by Mr. Hierholzer, the young men 
turned themselves into whirling wheels. 
'Bhirned somersaults in the air, hung hy 
their heels (almost) and did other won- 
fl.'rful thirgs with themselves, which 
made some of the audience look the 
other way. for fear of witnessing a 
tragedy. Everything came off safely, 
however without a hitch, cr a slip, and 
the hearty applause was well deserved. 
SENIORS IN WHITE. 

Club swinging by a mixed class of nix- 
teen young men and sixteen young wo- 
men of the Senior Class was one of the 
prettiest exercises of the evening. The 
class banner, gray and crimson, was car- 
ried in front of the class by Miss Esther 
Taggart. as the young people entered the 
room. Each one of the thirty-two , was 
In white, with small black bow tie. The 
girls. Instead of the regulation bloomers, 
wore white skirts, of walking length. The 
young men wore black leather belts and 
a stripe of crimson on the white trousers. 
,1>*eh wore on the left arm a small shield 
Jn the claes colors,, bearing the numerals, 
•"OS."- ... '1 

r 'The club swinging was graceful, show* 
ifciS: cixefnl practice and accurate work.. 

Buck vaulting by the Gym team includ- 
ed excellent work. The young men's 
muscles seemed to \be made of the most 
pliable steel and their leaps, somersaults 
and vaulting were done with utmost 
ease and promptness. Nothing seemed 
too hard for them to do. whether in the 
air or on the buck, and while the people 
sometimes held their breath, it was with 
the feeling of certainty that every man 
would alight on his feet when he should 
finally come to the ground again. The 
work concluded with the forming of a 
number of pyramids. 

Marching by young men of the Senior 
Class won rounds of applause from the 
audience for the promptness of action, 
quic kness and accu racy In wheeling and 
Turning at ' command: """ 1'liey wore - tny 
white suits, in which they had previously 
appeared. - . i., r ' . 

' ' GRACEFUL POSING. 

- In white flowing robes of the Oreeian 
style, with hair bound by fillets of white 
ribbons, sixteen young girls of the Se- 
nior Class danced a graceful polka-ma- 
zurka, accompanied by waving arm move- 
ments and fluttering draperies. . This 
merged into a series of picturesque poses. 
In which the girls grouped themselves In 
various attitudes about a Grecian column, 
while the air "Annie Laurie" was softly 
hummed. 

The "Tumbling Team" concluded the 
programme in a series of stunts of varied 
naturet each of which was vigorously 
applauded. In these feats of strength 
and agility the participants were Carl 
Hierholzer, William Hagenbuch, Charles 
Preston and Ira Holman. 

THOSE WHO TOOK PART.' • 

Participants In.the various events were 
as follows:. " 
: Young men of Junior Class (dumb bells) 

- LeRov Booze. Clarence Caley. Neely 
Graham. Wllmer Crouthamat, B. Roy 
Fisher, Chester McAfee, Robert Pritchet, 
E. V. Smiley. H. W. Taylor. Walter 
Thieraf, Harry Wolf, Howard Wollaston, 
William Herr. Robert ' Brinton, Arthur 
Yum. H-. J. Stowe, H. B. Price. William 
"WeattH. '■ 

- Junior Girls (Fancy Steps)— Georgine 
Ashenfelter, Ruth "Anderson. Mabel 
Barnes, Maud Barnes, Olive Thompson, 
Mabel Mercer. Carrie • Mercer, Minnie 
Moore, Sara Chandler, Miriam Alexander, 
Emma Dewoes, Grace LeCoupe, Reba 
Swayne, - Dorothy Darlington, Mildred 
Swnyne. Frances Fretz, Margaret Wil- 
liams. Elizabeth Nelson, Stella Laughlln, 
Margaret Keves. Laura Roschen. 



Men of Middle Year Cla?s (Bar Belels)— 
Rafael Acosta. Furino Boya. Juste Ra- 
mos., John Krauss. Jesse Green, Vincent 
Fernandez, Irwin Boeshore. Herbert 
Bates, ■ Warren Pierce, Edgar Haney,' 
Robert Curtin. Allen Krall. Roy Huns- 
bcrger, John Alger, Russell Pross, Howard 
Moll. William Dunlap. Vincent Coover, 
George Gayman. George Ruth, Franklin 
Buzby, Faustin Hoover. 

SWEDISH DANCERS. 

Girls of Sub-Junior Grades— Misses 
Margaret Buchanan. Sara Ramsey. Sara 
Roak, Harriet Smelker, May Jamison, 
Leora 5 Marple. Eva Thompson, Amy 
Sturch, Elva Blakey, Florence Youngman, 
Edna Fritz. Alice McLees, Jennie Ranch, 
Mav Pennock. Amanda Price, Mary 
Reeves, Anna McKee. Bertha Neal, Anna 
.Adams. M«rv. Marsh. 

Tho "Gym." Team consists of Messrs.* 
Herbert Mathers, Charles Preston, John 1 
Kanagy. William Hagenbuch, Irey Hol- 
man. Robert Hall. Leslie Burnell, George 
Givlllium, Jesse Green, Ramon Jaun, 
Eurlqua Vila, James Gallery, Octavio 
Marcano. Gustavo Noel. Harry Reed. 
SENIOR MEN AND MAIDENS. 

The thirty-two Seniors who swung clubs 
together were: Misses Jennie Ward, 
Flora Hinds, Violet Evans, Bertha 
Granger, May Ake, Millie Clerk, Margaret 
Blachnold. Isabel Byrne, Clara Davis, 
Grace Cochran, Elsinore Giddlngs, Flor- 
ence Kepner, Joanna Reeves, Pearl Tomp- 
kins, Bessie Brendllnger, Grace Ayres, 
Messrs. John Byerly, Beale Schmucker, 
Arthur Conard, Harry Rosenberger. Clyde 
Dengler. Lawrence Geist, Mortimer 
Whitehead, Edgar Rufe. William Hagen- 
buch, John Kanagy, Arthur Walton, Al- 
bert Hanby, Herbert Mathers. Herbert 
LeVan. Reed Henderson. Chester Witmer. 

Middle-Year Girls (Dumb .Bells)— Annie 
Hill. Sara Edwards, Eva Danenhower, 
Adella Becker, Edna Pollock, Thalia Con- 
nell, Mary King. Verona Spicer, Emma 
Cloud. Laura Stauffer. Jennie Ranch. 
Maud Taylor. Anna Krauser, Elezabeth 
Kelthen, Ivah Chamberlain. Fannie Wei- 
kel. Mabel Coolbaugh, Elizabeth Dayette. 
Sophia Steese. Mabel Mathers. Edith 
Wanner, Elizabeth Arnold. Mabel Achey, ; 
Edith Brown. Mary Hllle, Bertha Jones,. 
Elvira Johnson. Hazel Huey. Elsie Funk, 
Mary Nicholas. Ida Pyle. Katharine 
Rahu, Allie Foukin. Sara Sharer, Marian 
Dean. Brunetta Howard. 

MARCHING SENIORS. 
The young men of the Senior Class who 
were in the march were: Lawrence Amos, 
John Byerly. Arthur Conard, Emery Claar, 
Clyde Dengler, Raymond K. Denworth, 
Philip Dunn, Howard Evans. Lawrence 
Geist. W. S. Hagenbuch. Albert W. Han- 
by, Reed Henderson. John Kanagy. Ches- 
ter P. Lewis. Herbert LeVan. Herbert 
Slathers. Horace Pyle, Edgar Rufe, Harry 
Rosenberger, Beale Schmucker, Henry 
Shelley, Arthur Walton, M. C. Whitehead, 
Chester Witmer. > 

The young women who took part in the 
aesthetic posing were: Misses Clara 
Davis, Flora Hinds. Marion Sharpless, 
May Ake, Violet Evans. Florence Roden- 
boh, Isabel Byrne. Elsinor Glddings, Alice 
White, Mabel Kaughman, Pearl Tomp- 
kins, Millie Clark, Mary Walp. Grace 
Cochran, Florence Kelly, Florence Kelly, 
Florence Kenner. 

MODEL SCHOOL PUPILS. ' 

The little people who represented the 
Model School were from Miss Adelaide 
Woodward's room and were: David Mc- 
Farland. Marjorie Brice. Helen Daller, 
Sadie Pyle. Lilian Ehinger, Enda V.' 
F'nney, Victor Pyle, Harry. Carey, Jos. 
McCormick. Mary Andress, Clara In- 
gram, Erma Steelmafl,-' Walter Wright, 
Helen Harvey. Anna Gibson, David Mc- 
G-rogan. Gertrude Harvey, LeRoy Reed, 
Helen Nutt, Authur Voltz, Margaret 
Burnham, Ernest Hoopes, Lydia Yerkes, 
William Margerum, Arthur Pyle, Mar- 
garet • Kane. Rebecca Broomall, . David 
Miles. Blanche Thompson. Mary Mat-' 
thews, Kathryn Brooke. Dora Passmore,< 
Mary Reynolds, Ruth Pugh. Clara Ker-. 
win, Elizabeth Jones, Allan Broomall,! 
George Riddle. Russell Elliott, Gheen- 
Durborow, Joseph Hauselt, George Mc-J 
Grogan, Ada McDowell, Florence Wise,- 
Marian Pyle, * 



82 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



^slnnual 

I u6/lc ^Demonstration 



of t/,e Work 



r //,, 



ttl r/ie 



a. /n/sica/ i/r, 



mnirn 



s>, 



epartment 



State format Sc/ioot 
West Chester. Vienna. 

cfriday Q)o' j, ^Jiarc/i /, '07 

fit 7.30 C\ /„<■/■ 
PART II 

1 . Dumb Bells - 42 Young Women of Middle Year Class 

2. Marching - - - Young Men of Senior Class 

3. Club Swinging 

44 Young Men and Young Women of Senior Class 

4. Flying Rings .... "Gym" Team 

5. Aesthetic Gymnastics 

["j Fancy Steps and Figure Dancing 
[f>] Posture Grouping 



6. Acrobatics 



24 Young Women of Senior Class 
"Gym" Team 



{fragrant 

PART I 

1. Gymnastic Story — Play - - Model School, 2nd Grade 

2. ["] Free Gymnastics. Swedish Day's Order 

[/'] Fancy Steps - 30 Young Women of Junior Class 

3. Dumb Bells - Young Men of Junior Class 

4. Folk Dance : "Valfa Vadmal." Weaving Dance 

"Fiddlers", Miss Bertha Jones and Miss Jean Hastie 
[For description see page 4) 

I 2 Young Women of Junior Class 



5. Bar Bells 

6. Parallel Bars 



Young Men of Middle Year Class 
"Gym" Team 



Jtlir lUivtuuiu Oaiirr 

I Ms is one ol the niii. si of the Folk Dances in Sweden and 
ic|»n icnts the weaving of irv.: homespun. 

Fig. I. Represents [lie working back and forth of the loom. 

Kg. 2. 1 he men and women on uppositc sides circling each other 
willi elbows hooked together shows the attaching ot the thread hum 
tide to s de. 

hie,. 3. Tile clapping of ihe hand* represents the clicking of the 

shul'itc in it-, journey between the threads. 

F"ig. 4 ami F ig. V Show dilferent forms of weaving. 

Kg. 0. 1 he winding up into a close circle aymlxili/cs the tying ot 
the knot when the work is complete. 

Fig. 7. Seems to emlxidy simply the "let^nslust" or joy of lite 
felt by the peasant (o'k. expressed in a way commensurate with their 
unbounded health and del-i (it in physical activity, coupled with their 
innate love ol music and rhythmic motion. 

28 FEBRUARY 1907 

Swedish Folk Dance. 

In the annual gymnastic exhibition' at 
the State Normal School to-morrow night 
a special feature -will be tho Swedish folk 
dance, one of the oldest dances In Swed- 
en. It Includes the weaving dance, Imi- 
tating the -weaving of homespun. Twelve 
young people will take part, all in cos- 
tume. 

A portion of the senior class will appear 
In an aesthetic feature of the programme, 
half the quota being In white gowns and 
the other half adorneC with garlands, 
making an unusually pretty effect 



Annual Public Demonstration 

Department Physical Training 
Gymnasium of West Chester State Normal School 

West Chester, Pa. 

Friday Evening, March 1st, 1907 

at 7.30 o"clock 
GENERAL ADMISSION - 35 CENTS 




1907 Mens Gym Team 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 83 



2 MARCH 1907 



NORMAL STUDENTS 

IN "GYM" WORK: 

Their Annual Programme Attracts Large 
Number of Spectators. 



Jinny Ttncbtrn From Other Schools See 

and Admire — The Model School 

Pupils Onto the "Zoo." 

Last evening In the gymnasium of the 
State Normal School many spectators 
enjoyed the annual exhibition of the worK 
of the physical training department. 

Under the direction of Dr. and Mrs. 
Ehinger, heads of the department, as- 
sisted by Miss Agnes Thompson and Mr. 
Mullison. the young people gave a fine 
demonstration of what may be done 'n 
the way of muscular development, and 
the training of eye. car and attention. 
Free gymnastics, marching work with 
clubs, bar and dumb bells gave variety 
to the exercises, while heavy work by 
the gym. team reflected much credit on 
training and trainers. 

YELLS AND BANNERS. 

Class banners were much in evidence. 
Those of bygone ■ days hung overhead.; 
lending brightness to the scene, while 
senior and middle year classes carried 
their colors proudly when they made 
thftr formal appearance. The gallery 
was a solid mass of pupils, who applaud- 
ed with enthusiasm. Class yells came at 
ihe conclusion of each class feature. m»!l 
bouquets to the instructors were a p<.i: t 
of the order of the evening. 

TO MERRY MUSIC. 

The musical accompaniments of the 
evening were played on the piano by Miss, 
Florence Woodward, who added much to 
the general effect by her spirited music. 

The exercises of the evening began with 
tjae advent of a bevy of tots from the 
%aei5nd grade in the Model School, who 
JElrnp'Sred to their places at a signal 
fcpni their instructor, Miss Thompson. 
•■Motioning for their attention, Miss 
Thompson said: "We're going to play a 
game to-night; it's called 'Going to the 
zoo and seeing all the animals.' Now, 
lirst we are going to run to the zoo as 
fast as ever we can." 

PLAYED AT ZOO. 

At the signal the little folks started off 
at a rapid trot, In single file, circling the 
group until all had returned to their ori- 
ginal places. 

Having ihus arrived at the "zoo," the 
hoys and girls were told to buy two bags 
of peanuts of imaginary brand, to eat 
one bag, blow it up and burst it The 
command was obeyed with promptness 
and zest. The blowing up of the ima- 
ginary bags made a fine, breathing exer- 
cise, and the sudden clap of hands which 
announced the bursting of the bag came 
with precision. 

Different animals were next Initiated, 
the wobbly walk of the bear giving exer- 
cise for the waist and arm muscles, the 
hop of the kangaroo was fine exercise, 
while the prairie dog's quick turn of head 
Irnm side to side brought the neck mus- 
cles into play. The motions were those 
customarily used in school room calisthe- 
nics, but the little play made the exer- 
cise much more interesting to the little 
ones. 

The exercise ended with a drill in atten- 
tion. "I say stoop! or I say stand!" were 
the commands given in rapid succession, 
and the unwary boy or girl who stooped 
when told to stand, or vice versa, was out 
of the game and had to sit down. 

The little folks who took part were: 
Horace Malin. Frank Davis, Helen Man- 
Icy. George Wright, Edith Osborn, Ray- 
mond Joyce. Mildred Wright, James 
Burns, Edmund Jpnes, Lydia Voltz, Flor- 
ence Steward. Francis Goodley, Mary In- 
gram, Paul Daller, Helen Faddis. Walter 
Smith, William Baldwin, Flwood Devon- 
shire. John Gale. James Rellly, Harry 
Heist, Pearl Margerum, Earl Harvey, 
Loftus Carey, Kathaleen Broomall, Sue 
Ingram. Erald Welsh, Marguerite Wright 
Ethel Faddis, William Burns, Mabel 
Goodley, Marguerite Hayes, Leonore 
Wonderland, Charles Margerum, Clara 
Matthews, Ida Goodley. 



NATTY JUNIORS. 

Free gymnastics (Swedish Day's Order) 
followed by a series of fancy steps, were 
admirably given by thirty young women 
of tho Junior Class. 

Wearing black bloomers, white waists, 
with stiff linen collars and black ties, the 
girls presented a particularly natty ap- 
pearance, and the precision with which 
they marched, wheeled and came to po- 
sition showed that their drill had been 
a thorough one. The fancy steps brought 
graceful motion and rhythmic aotlon in- 
to play. The girls who took part In this 
exercise were: 

Kmma Carpenter, Anna Stine, Evelyn 
Johnson, Beatrice Butt, Martha Reeves, 
Anna Hallman, Florence Reeder, Bessie 
Bowres, Pearl Guelden, Eva Ashenfelter, 
Kate Fetherofl, Ida Moyer, Mary Pass- 
moer, Anna Rodenbach. Letltia Davis, 
Sara Brabson, Georgia Bonneville, Louisa 
Grevelle. Mary Gable, Anna Jones.Ethel 
Busby, Louise Rockwell, Lulu Rutlldge, 
Mary Knight.' Anna Adams, Esther Webb. 

Sixteen young men of the Junior Class, 
wearing crimson sweaters and gray trous- 
ers, went through a dumbbell drill, which 
required both strength and agility. Sev- 
eral of Its features were new and all were 
very effective. 

The participants were: Norman G. 
Acheer, Philip C. Brooke, A. Harmer 
Burket, Leslie Burnell, S. Randall Det- 
wller, Jesse Hause, Shaner Happersett,Ad- 
dlson Lipplncott, Clinton Miller, Nelson 
Mover, Arthur W. Reeves, T. Walter Re- 
nier, T. Lester Scotten, Orval L. Smith, 
W.m G. Stevens, J. Geo. Wilson, Albert 
Y eatts. 

PEASANT VJOictnr- 



The prettiest exercise of the evening: 
was the folk dance. "Valfa Vadmal" 
(Weaving Dance), one of the oldest of 
the Swedish peasant dances. It Is sup- 
posed to represent the weaving of home- 
spun. ^> 

Twelve young girls of the Junior Class, 
Dreceded by Miss Bertha Jones, and Miss 
Jean Hastle, as "fiddlers," entered In pro- 
cession, two and two. Half the number 
represented peasant girls, and were dress- 

■ ed in red skirts, white waists, long white 
nprons and a floating white headdress. The 
remaining six represented young men. 

TTiey~wC)fe _ "dafk~*fjlOomers, white --vtnfsts" 
and red skull caps. The "fiddlers" were 
similarly attired. 

; To the music of piano and violins the 
dance was given gracefully and with as 
much animation as It was ever danced 
on a Swedish green sward. 

The figures were much like those of 
the Virginia Reel, but were supposed to 
represent the various processes of weav- 
ing, the rhythmic clapping of hands and 
marking of time with the foot represent- 
i ing the click of the shuttle, as It passed 
back and forth through the loom. A gay 
little dance, which seemed merely to In- 
dicate the joy of life followed the wind- 
ing up into a close circle, Indicating that 
the work Is done and the knot tied. 
' The girls who so gracefully Imitated the 
Swedish lads and lassies were Misses Eva, 
Ashenfelter. Kate Fetherolf, Emma aCr- 
penter, Letltia Davis, Esther Wilt. Bea- 
trice Butt, Bessie Bowers, Mary Knight, 
Anna Adams. Martha Reeves, Ethel Bus- 
by and Louise Rockwell. 

MIDDLERS YELL, 
An exercise with bar bells by young 
men of the Middle Year Class was given 
to a rruslcal accompaniment, the motions 
graceful and accurate. 

As they were leaving the room a' large 
bouquet of pink carnations was handed 
to Dr. Ehinger, and as h eaccepted it 
the young men closed about him, giving 
the class yell. " -• 

Irwin G. Alger, J. Herbert Bate, Geo. 
C. Bingaman, Jr., Flrmo Boija, Robert T. ' 
Brlnton, Jos. T. Budhanan, Robt. E. : 
'Cooke, Wallace Danahower, Walter G. i 

■ Flgley, Vincent Fernandez. Geo. Gordy, j 
Clarence Harvey, Irey Holman. Chester i 
McAfee, Marshall M .rtln. Henry, Mess-, 
mer. C. R. Meloney, 'Wallace Peters. H. 
B._PrIce, Chester Ross, Alfred Robertson, 
Chas. Rozelle, Thos. F." Schaff, T2dwin V. 
Smiley. Herbert W. Taylor, Walter 
Thleroft, Harry Wolf, Howard Wollas-^ 
ton. / jli 

ON THE BARS. *f 

The gym. team was welcomed with ap- 
plause when it made its appearance and 
dragged Into position the parallel bars 
and mattresses used In the heavy work 



The young men aid excellent work, both 
Individually and as a team. The display 
of knotted muscles on shoulders and In, 
biceps made It evident that the training , 
had been carefuV and continuous, and 
took away any fear that their might be 
a failure at some critical point. 

An elaborate pyramid concluded feats 
of skill. 

In the gym. team are Included: Irvln 
Boeshore. Ovidlo Pena, Robt. Cooke, 
LeRoy Haines, Vincent Fernandez, S. - 
Randall Detwller, Alvln Eckert, Harry 
Bohlew, Leslie Burnell, Chas, Preston, 
Wm. Cornog, Walter Renner. Marvin 
Moyer, Raymond Juan, James Gallery, 
Octavlo Marcano. Hiram, Ewes, Geo. 
Glvllllary. Irey Halman. 

UNDER FLOATING COLORS. 

The new banner of the middle year class 
made Its first public appearance, carried 
by Miss Sara Chandler. 
- It floated over forty-two young women 
who are proud to call themselves mem- 
bers of class of '08 and who gave their 
class yell with almost as much vigor as 
their brothers could have done. They did 
also some good work with dumb bells, 
executing several difficult evolutions. 

Before breaking ranks thev presented 
Mrs. Ehinger with a bouquet of violets 
and lilies of the valley. 

The girls In the "middler" ranks were: 
Georgine Ashenfelter, Ruth Anderson, Abi- 
gail Baler, Helen Baker, Margaret Buch- 
anan, Sara Chandler, Dorothy Darling- 
ton, Anna Duell, Clarion Fenton, Laura 
Haddock, Irene Hartman, Anna Glfford, 
Georgiana Edmunds, Jean Hastle, Mar- 
tha Halderman. Anna Kohler, Karlena 
Kruse, Sara Klntz. Edna Mendenhall, 
Aenes McAdam, Mabel Keely, Gertrude 
Miles, Frances North, Mary Pearson 
Sara Ramsey, Sara Roak. Onea Roberts, 
Helen Smith. Leora Marple. Margaret 
Slack, Nettie Spicher, Reba Swayne, 
Ethel Stanert, Elsie Yeakle, Bertha Pvle, 
Mary Sullivan, Helen Powell. Margaretta 
Good, Louise Steehl. Laura Roechen, 
Lulu Warner. Edna Schaffer. 

SENIORS IN WHITE. 

When these had left the room the floor 
was occupied by twenty young men of the 
Senior Class, in white suits with black 
belts and ties. Marching In solid ranks 
In division, forward, backwards forming 
wedge-shaped figures, stars, diamonds 
and other designs, while never missing 
the rhythm of the music, won for them 
warm applause. 

Those who knew them counted In the 
ranks: 

Senior Marching Boys— Raphael Acosta, 
John M. Alger. Irvln Boeshore, Warren 
Brosius B. Franklin Buzby, Clarence 
Caley, Robert E. Dunlap, George C Gay- 
man, Jesse P. Green, Edgar G. Harry, 
Roy Hunsberger, John E. Kraus, Hunter 
S,VnSii E ' wood V ewl3 ' Warren Pierce, 
Russell Pross, Justo Ramos, Jose Hi 
Reyra. George F. Ruth, Rabv Mlnter 

Twenty-six fair Senior maidens, all' in'' 
white, jn.ned their brothers at the con- 

tl U r S ^\ 0t the march and wlth them went! 
through an exercise ln_whlch the whirling 

Indian clubs kept'time to' the music"in an 
inspiring manner. . 

The Senior banner, born by the class 
Secretary, Miss Mary Hill, graced the en y 
trance and exit of the Seniors. if 

The young women were: Misses Alice, 
Grim, Elvira Johnson, Elizabeth 1 

Matthews. Mary Betts, Marv King ' 
Marion Ridgway. Maud Tavlor, Brunetta^ 
Howard, Helen Walsh, Helen McClos=ey 
.Maud Le'ster, Sara Edwards, Mnrlnn 
■Dean, Eva Chamberlain, Edith Brown 
lAlta Ehrgood, Edith Wanner, Marlon! 
■JMurrny, Mary Denison, Ann HIM, Dollv 
Longstreth. Laura Faust. Emma Keecri 
Josephine Granger, Carmen Shrack, Grace 
*rretz. 

! The Gym. Team showed what It was 
.able to accomplish on the flvlng rings 
^winging and turning in mid air In a wav 
that caused some of the timid ones to hold 
their breath, but all came to earth in 
safety. The pyramid formed on the ring' 
supported by members of the team Iri 
various attitudes, was excellently done J 
PICTURE POSING. 
Realistic gymnastics, including postur- 
ing and fancy steps was a pleasing con- 
tribution by the Senior girls. A dozen In 
white robes with Greek-key border de- 
sign took graceful attitudes while the 
music sounded soft and low. Then a 
bevy of pink clad maidens, with flowers 



84 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



nn thermair-ana-carrymr^TsaTiiFTsnsnra 
blossoms came like the Impersonation of 
Spring-time, dancing gracefully, in time to 
the music. ? 

.The girls were these: Grace Connard. 
Grace Lajidls. Eleanor Shlnger, Eva 
Thompson, Dorothy Doud, Elva Blakey 
Lldie Jones, Florence Toungman, Sophia 
Steese,- Hazel Huey. Jennie Humpton. 
Mabel Coolbaugh, Christine Hailstone! 
Martha Bullock, Mabel Roat, Clara Van-' 
Sickle, Laura Saul, Bessie Leidv, Nellie 
Appleby Carrie Caulfield, Delia H11L May 
Blearn, Vlda Edwards. ■ ; 

This pretty scene gave place to the mere 
prosaic, though, to those athletically In- 
clined, no less Interesting one, In which 
the Gym. team wound up the entertain-, 
ment by an exhibition of tumbling In 
which they did the work as well apj 
parently, aa though they had been peri 
fectly fresh. -' N 1 

PHYSICAL, DIRECTORS PRESENT, 
Among the physical directors from- out 
of town were noticed these: 

Miss Anna R. Hughes, Friends' School, 
Washington, D. C; Miss Margaret Rem- 
ington, Girls' High School, Philadelphia; 
Miss Sara Martin, Berwjn Public Schools' 
Miss Sara Hamilton, Chester, St. Paul's 
Guild; Mr. Horace Butterworth, Temple 
College, Philadelphia; Miss Emily Smed- 
ley, Westtown Friends' School; Miss 
Stevens, Darlington Seminary, West Ches. 
ter; Dr. Ida V. Reel, Coatesvllle; Mr. Rire-, 
sell. Institute for Deaf and Dumb, Mt 
Airy, Philadelphia; Miss Grace Green, In- 
stitute for Deaf and Dumb. Mt. Airy 
Philadelphia; Miss Annie Wells, Girls' 
Normal School, Philadelphia: Mr F A 
Flnkeldey, Glrard College, Philadelphia; 
Miss Florence King. Temple College, Phil- 
adelphia; Mr. Isaac Porter, Penn/ Char- 
ter School, Philadelphia; Mr, Spencer M 
Bennett, House of Refuge, Glen Mills- 
Mr. O. F. Monahan, Hotchklss School, 
Lakeville, Conn.; Prof. Ash,. Coatesvllle 



4 APRIL 1907 

WILL GIVE AN EXHIBITION. 1 

Normal Boys 'Will Appear In Indian 
Club Exercise To-Mght. 

The sixteenth convention or the Ameri- 
can Physical Education Association Is- be- 
ing held In Philadelphia, this week, with 
a musical tea yesterday afternoon In thet 
auditorium of Drexel Institute, and a, 
meeting in the museum of archaeology,' 
at 33d and Spruce streets, last evening, 
when there was a reception to the dele-| 
gates from all parts of the country and 
several addresses by prominent men. This 
morning there were several addresses at 
the same place, and this afternoon an* 
evening, there will be an extended series' 
of demonstrations of school gymnastics, i 
on Franklin Field and In the U. of Pi" 
gymnasium. 

Dr. C. E. Ehlnger, director of the phy- 
sical training department of the west 
Chester State Normal School, Is a mem- 
ber of the general committee, and will 
accompany to the convention a class of 
twenty-four young men of the school, 
which will give an exhibition of Indian 
club swinging from 8 to 8.20 o'clock this 
evening. This class gave w practice drill 
yesterday afternoon In the Normal gym- 
nasium, and will no doubt make a credit-' 
able showing before the multitude to- 
night. The team will leave h6re early 
this afternoon, so that they may witness 
the exercises bv the teams from the oth- 
er schools— Philadelphia Nprmal School 
for Girls; Elwyn Training High School, 
folk dances; field hockey, soccer, ball, 
captain ball, dodge ball, by teams from 
various schools. In the evening tnero 
will be drills and exercises In wrestling, 
gymnastics, pyramid building, iwlmmlng, 
etc. 

There will be addresses to-morrow vy 
Dr. Babbitt, Dr. McKenzle. Dr. J. It. 
Mitchell, Dr. Anderson (Tale), and many 
others, and the sessions will continue un- 
til Saturday noon. 



4 MAY 1907 



The Normal School Gymnasium was 
crowded yesterday afternoon with an en- 
thusiastic audience of pupils, parents and 
friends from the borough, In honor of 
the first annual gymnastic exhibit by 
pupils of the High Street Public School. 
Under the direction of Miss Agnes Thomp- 
ton, assistant to Mrs. C. E. Ehlnger, of 
the Department of Physical Culture, the 
young people have been preparing for 
days to make this public exhibit of the 
work they are doing in muscle training. 

To parents and visitors In the gallery 
the main floor presented an attractive 
appearance, even before the exercises be- 
gun. Each teacher, surrounded by her 
bevy of ycung folks, had an allotted cor- 
ner or space at one side of the room. - 
Most of the little girls were In white 
dresses and their pink, blue and red hair 
i ibbons and sashes gave to the scene the 
appearance of beds of bright colored flow- 
ers. 

The boys nearly all were white shirt 
waists and dark trousers. 

The quick, alert movements, prompt re-" 
eponse to commands and enthusiastic in- 
terest which the lads and lassies dis- 
played made their spirit contagious and 
the spectators became almost as enthu- 
siastic as the young folks themselves. 

Thirty tiny people from room 9, Miss 
Linda Brooke, teacher, were the lirst to 
claim, attention. Under the leadership of 
Miss Thompson they played a pretty 
game, "Going to the Country." 

"We will go for a visit to Grandpa's 
house in the country," said Miss Thomp- 
son. "On the way there we will trot, just 
as Grardpa's horse would If he should 
come to meet us, and take us all up In 
his carriage." 

Away the small people sped, trotting 
quickly and lightly around a certain 
srxice, then back to their places. 

Then the weary little horses were told 
to breathe deeply as they rested, and this 
was followed by "running upstairs to 
see Grandma" (an exercise In high step- 
ping) Aiterwards they "pumped water," 
jumped, picked dandelions, and Imitated 
ether things which a trip to the country 
.might suggest. 

* Room 11, another primary grade, was 
drilled by their own teacher, Miss Bate- 
man. 

■ Instead of going to the country they 
went to the Zoo, where they pretended to 
buy peanuts and burst the bags, and then 
impersonated the prairie dogs, bears, ele- 
jrhants and kangaroos. The hopping ot 
the last named agile animal proved great 
fun, both for the. children and for the 
spectators. 

Rdbm 12, taught by Miss Jessie Wherry, 
plavert "Bird Catcher." Little Elizabeth 



TJOwlin~'waTThe~TnsfneT - BlTa~ffrio~gtiaraetr 
the nest as a haven of refuge for the 
birdies who were pursued by two, bird, 
catchers, Walter Lytle and Foster Mlnich. 
At the end of the game a count showed 
that the mother bird had fourteen and 
"the bird catchers ten of the birds. "Jump- 
ing the L.rook" was another merry game, 
the brook banks being two chalk murks 
on the floor. . -__'• 

" SWEDISH DRILLS. 
' The older. .pupils took part In Swedish 
movements, three rooms occupying the 
floor at one time. 

Rooms 8, 7 and 5, Miss Josie Crater, 
Mls» Estella Pyle and Miss Mary L. 
Heed, teachers, worked together, going 
promptly through the various movements. 

Rooms 6, 3 and 10, taught by Miss Anna 
Woodward, Miss Daniels and Miss Jessie 
Sharp, followed and the last group ot 
roomr, 1, 2 and 4, taught by Miss A. M. 
McLear, Miss Mabel Smith and Miss 
Florence John, and composed of the larg- 
er pupils, concluded this part of the pro- 
gramme. , 
Miss Thompson directed all the Swedish 
orill work, but the several teachers had 
dene good work In preparing tho pupils 
for it 

• • ■' RELAY RACES. 

The climax of the entertainment was 
the relay race. In two sections, one run 
by the girls and one by the boys. Six of 
fach, from the fourth, fifth, sixth, sev- 
enth and eighth grades participated. 
Names ot the runners were, printed yes- 
terday, i 

Girls from rooms 1, 2. 3 and .4 ran first, 
dashing half way across the floor and 
rounding Indian clubs, set up as goals. 
Room 2 won. 

Then came the contest between rooms 
T, fi, 7, 8 and 10, In which room 5 carried 
off the honors. The final between rooms 
2 and 6 was watched with bated breath, 
and when it was won by room 2 the ap- 
plause was prolonged and vigorous. 

Then came the boys, the rooms being 
classified as before.! The first section 
was won by room 1 and the second by 
room 6. 

The Aral contest was wildly exciting. 
Ench runner was cheered and when room 
six was announced victorious the boys 
nearly went wild. Room 1 had Its turn 
cheering for it was first announced vic- 
torious, but It was afterwards decided 
that one of the representatives had start- 
ed for the goal an instant before he 
should have done so. 

The Judges were Dr. and Mrs. Ehlnger, 
Miss Adelaide Woodward, Miss Rebecca 
Liggett, assisted by several members of 
the Senior Class at the Normal, Miss 
Steese, Miss Brown, Miss Retts, Miss 
Landls. Miss Camard, Miss Toungman 
and Miss Eliza Foulke, of West Chester. 

In free gymnastics the winners were 
rooms 1 and 11. 




1907 Men and Women Indian Clubs Part II Number 3 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 85 



ANNUAL 

DEMONS' 



PUBLIC 

RATION! 



I . Marching 



& 



roqram 



PART I 

Class of 24 Young Women 



OP Till: WOl?n or- mi: physical 
TRAINING DIzPAm, IliNT OP Till: 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHIlSTIzl? - PENNSYLVANIA 



2. Dumb Bells 



Young Men of Junior Class 



3. Swedish Gymnastic Day's Order 

24 Young Women of Junior Class 

4. Electric Club Swinging 

Messrs. Mullison, Shortlidge, Martz and Taylor 



FRIDAY EVG, FEB.2o,'0o 

7\T SCVCN THIRTY O'CLOCK 



EJ'-vi/-— »» 



PART II 



5. Bar Bells 



Young Men of Middle Year Class 



6. Parallel Bars 

Train and Trolley Time Table see 4th page 



"Gym" Team 



I. Dumb Bells - 40 Young Women of Mid< le Year Class 

Movements set to Tscharkowslti's "Danse Characterislique" 



2. Marching 



Young Men of Senior Class 



3. Club Swinging 

56 Young Women and Young Men of Senior Class 



4. Horizontal Bar 



"Gym" Team 



5. Aesthetic Gymnastics (see synopsis, 4th page) 

26 Young Women of Senior Class 
Movements set to Liszt's "Polka Mazurka 1 



Synopsis of Aesthetic Gymnastic Number 



The Maidens' Invasion of Titania's Realm 

Scene —Spanish woods. Time — Sunset. 

Enter a group of merry maidens. After a dance they suddenly d 
cover what seems a fairy bower. With characteristic g.rlish interest th 
run to examine it. To punish their curiosity Queen Titania, as yet invisib 
causes a deep sleep to come upon them. 

A second group of maidens enter, enjoy their sylvan dance, and 
also attracted by the fairy bower, with like fate. 

Enter Queen Titania. After touching each sleeping maiden with 
star tipped wand she ascends her throne. The maidens awake, 
obedient to the will of the fairy queen, who guides them by the wave of 
wand, thev ?way and po;e. Sudd. n!y the sunact !;e!b sound on th? eve 
air, the maidens toss a rose to their queen, who disappears, and ihe mait 
depart. 



6. 



(«) Acrobatics 
(/>) Pyramids 



"Gym" Team 
"Gym" Team 



26 FEBRUARY 1908 



-*"'-"'"" Electric Club Swinging. . 

One of the attractive and beautiful fea- 
tures of the annual gymnastic exhibition 
at the West Chester State Normal School 
Friday night will be electric club swing- 
ing. This has 1 been arranged with much 
care, and is sure to please the people. In 
addition there will be several other oret- 
ty parts of the 'programme, and some of 
the finest team athletic work ever reen. 
there, which is saying much. The drill 1 
of the classes -nnd th6 atsthetlc ecen«wf 
by -seniors are especially good. 



Central Division leaves Market Street Station 10.42 P. M. 
Main Line ■ : ■ " "' 10.57 P. M. 

Downingtown Trolley leaves Trolley Station at 10 and I I P. M. 
Philadelphia Trolley leaves High and Gay streets at 10.15 

11.15 P. M. 

Kennett Square Trolley leaves High and Market streets at 10.10 P. 
(Usual time is 10 o'clock, but will be held ten' minutes to accommo 
this audience). 

Cars leave front of Gymnasium at 10.05 to connect with Kennett Squ 
Trolley, and at the close of the program to connect with other lines. 



!■ K. Temple, I'riuti- 
Wi-,1 Chester 



86 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



21 FEBRUARY 1908 



Annual. Public Demonstration 



OF THE 



V,V\ 



Department of Physical Training, 
State Normal" School, ; 

WEST CHESTER, PA. . 

Exhibition In Military and Fancy 
Marching. 

Clasn work In Dumb Bells. Bar Bells, 
Club Swinging- and Swedish Gymnastics. 

Class Dances, Aesthetic Gymnastics 
and Postures. Parallel Bar and Hori- 
zontal Bar Exercises, Acrobatics and 
Pyramids. 

Normal School Gymnasium, 
Friday Evening, Feb. 28th, 

AT 7.30. 

Tickets, 50 cents. No extra chargo for 

reserved seats. Tickets and chart at 

29 FEBRUARY 1908 

'-Last evening, before a large an InteP 
jested anemblage, the physical training de- 
partment of .he Stats No. mat f-cnool, 
gave Its annual demonstration. The work 
•was chiefly that cC the regular elaescs, 
'Showing what Is belns done to leve-h.p 
■the., body that It may keep pace with 
;the brain 'In' completing well- rounded 
manhood and womanhood. X.|*^\ 

~ Df. and Mrs. Ehingcr, nrd their nsslit- 
iflnts, Miss Davis and Mrs. Mulllson, re- 
delved . many . well merited congntut iM. in 
Lfor- the; way 'n which tneir |.up;ls cur.' 
*ducted themselves. The bouquets, ot 
.'Which each of the instructors received 
several, bore testimony of the students 
appreciation of the painstakhu; efforts 
jnade In their behalf.' BefV-e the end ot 
■$he evening the piano was profusely 
TBanked in carnations, sweet peas and daf- 
fodils, which the instructors bore off as 
piuch; prized souvenirs of the evening. 
v% The; music accompanying the exercises 
"was' not the least pleasing feature of the 
Evening, and by its accuracy and rhythm 
many of the prettiest evolutions were 
timed. Miss Davis, the assistant teacher 
flayed one or two of these, but Miss 
i Florence Woodward, of West Chester, 
'Contributed most of the music, seemingly 
juntlrlng, though she was at the piano 
►steadily during a number of the ex.ar- 
jflses. ',,,i \ 

-*- GUESTS FROM ELSEWHERE.- , : ' 
«T Besides the townspeople there wi.-e a; 
-number of guests from elsewhere, sp'iial- 
tty Invited because they are either engaged 
In physical training or are Intcested In 
.It.' Among them were: 
>- Miss Grace E. Kingsbury, Temple Col- 
lege. Philadelphia. :~'' . ' ; 
e Mies Mabel Dong, Swarth ncra-Prepara- 
'tory School, iivijij' :. ; "t 
• i Miss Sara Hamilton, St. Paul's -Guild, 
.Chester. "■• ' ?!-" , 
f Miss Emily Smedley, Westtown Board-' 
ting- School, / ; ' • 
;' Miss Agnes Thompson, Ardmve Pub.ic 
.Schools, Ardmore. 

.. Miss Ka'herlne Hurlburt, Philadelphia. 
Miss Amy VVe'ls, ulils' Normal ,°i hool, 
Philadelphia. .... ;. 

„ Dr. Ida V. Reil, Coatesville, 
... Frederick A. Flnkujiv, (jlrard College, 
■Philadelphia. ,' '.. 

■ 8pencer A. Benriett, Glen Mlll-j. ' 
.'Dr. Frank W. White, Temulo College. 
Philadelphia. 

— Prof. Ash, T. M. C. A.. Coatesvllle. 
JJ' IN FESTIVE TRIM. 

The Gymnaaiuin was In pain nltlre.wlih 
purple and gold streamers 1 1 lie f-chool 
.colors) much In evidence, and bannei9 
of fori, r class's susponded from iieau'a 
«nd rafters ovj.-.ieii In a wav whlcn rob- 
bed the place ^f the bareness which it 
indispensable to a high celling, crossed 
and recrossed by tho boi-ns for tho sup- 
port of apparatus. 
f 'he lut'Yof >-eais lit il.« sruth side 'f 
the building wes filled with interested 
.spectators and a -ow of . hai:s iii~ng the 
.wall was occupied by vlsito.-s who .couid 
not be accommodated elsewhere. Tho 



students who were to participate sat on 
the western and northern • M.ies of the 
'room, tho boys, as a Mile perched upon 
the horizontal bars, in the window seats 
.or on the ladder leading; to regions, alof.', 
•In varied attitudes of ea-je. 
; In the gallery the student portion of 
the audience was irowdod. standing pa- 
tiently during the whole e zoning, ready 
-wl'.li^applause for jned wont and for- 
getting in their enthusiasm to be tired. 
(The wirlc oe,;iii m' I'e pumpi:* it he 
•hour set for the begii hlng nl the enter- 
tainment, ' ' 30, Ine p> igr 101119 opening 
with a m»i".n b. - tlaes o ixintv - foi.i 
young women, under the direction of 
Mrs. C. E. Ehingor. 

• Twenty-four young men ot the Junlcr 
Class followed' with a we)! executed 
dumb bell drill, under direction of iJr. C, 
JSblnger. 

The young men In their crimson sweat- 
ers and gray trousers made an excellent 
appearance as they entered the room and 
before the drill was over they had wen 
applause for more than appearance. Their 
work was prompt and accurate and sin w- 
ed evidence of painstaking labor. Th» 
«xerclse ended with the class veil of 1310, 
newly composed for the occaslm. 

A class of young women of the Junior 
Class, wearing white shlr'waeits, ' hi: ck 
tiloomers and black neckties showed the 
regular work of the day In Swedish gym- 
nastics, marching, running and g Ins 
through various foot and arm exorcises 
for the cultivation of muscular and nclv- 
ous control. 
I „ HUMAN PIN WHEELS. 

Four young men with .transparent 
Indian clubs, illuminated by e'ectric 
Ughts, made themselves into very effec- 
tive plnwheels, livalling an ordinary 
Fourth of July exhibitor.. In their dex- 
trous handling the glowing clubs seem- 
ed transformed into writhing serpents 
which whirled and cniled about tiie 
heads of the performers, tangled them- 
selves into knots which were uncoiled 
as soon as formed and In a dozen ways 
surprised and pleased the audience. The 
Quartet, which did such good work 
were Messrs. Mulllson. Shcrtlldge, Martz 
&nd Taylor. Mr. Mullijon Is Dr< Ehinger's 
wwistant. Mr. Shortledga is a member of 
the faculty and Messrs. Murts an4;Tiy)or 
Hfe members of the seizor class. ' 

' UNDER NEW BANNER. , 
'The .young men of 'he Middle Tear 
Class, as they entered for their exercise 
with the bar bells, had the honor of 
bearing the newly pui chased class ban- 
ner of gold and white si- tin. The nu- 
rf\erals, 1909, hrown upon n white back- 
ground,, inspired the young men to ex- 
cellent work and their fair class mates 
looking on to v enthusiastic applause. 
The new banner was curried by E'l'.son 
layman. . . • 

The "Gym. Team" did some thriiling 
■Stunts" on the parallel bars, under di- 
rection of Mr. Mulllson. The young men 
seemed made of India rubber wound upon 
6$eel springs. 

. ,The fair spectators who chanced to he 
new to such exhibitions of musehlar 
pliability gasped or shuddered from time 
,lo time, as particularly d rhcult turns and 
twi sts were made and when the pyramid 
WHsTo+m erf—at — the ■ 'eon elusion — the — ap ^* 
f lausa came • only after a moment of 
bated breath, when it seemed reasonably 
fertaln that all .vould come to the ground 
with' whole bones and undislocated Joints. 

Forty young women of the Middle Veer 
Class took- part in a raiticularly pretty 
iumb bell exercise keepirg time to the 
music' of TochuiUowski'r "Danse Char~ 
icterlstique," played by Miss Davis, Mrs. 
Ehinger's assistant. The fancy steps and 
rhythmic striking of the dumb bells were 
•specially effective. The girls rallying 
Jround the brown -and white ' banner 
which .was carried by M.'e.s Emma Car- 
penter; showed, that their lung capacity 
dad not suffered by the training of tnclr 
muscles by giving their fcluss yell trithj 
a distinctness and vim that had not been' 
exceeded by their brothers. 1 ' 
' SENIORS IN WHITE. 

The marching oy the ycung men of the 
Senior Class was one of the special fea- 
tures. Thirty-six young men In white. 
suits, each wearing a crlmron carnation, 
black bow tie and black belt, kept almost 
perfect step as they followed the dtrec-- 
tions which Dr. Ehlnger gave through 
a large megaphone. In solid phalanx or. 
steadily marching coh nins they crossed 
and recrossed the floor, suddenly chang- 
ing to various iir/ures, ^circling around a 



central point In Ll:e manner of the sails 
of a wind -nlll and nnrching in varied 
evolutions which constantly changed in 
character. , 

Sixty Seniors, y^ung men and g.'ils In 
alternating columns took part In a club 
swinging exercise, doing the work In an 
accurate and finished way. All were In 
white, the young ladle3 wearing con- 
ventional skirts in their number Instead 
of the bloomers. 

HONORS FOR BOTH 
At the conclusion of the exercise the 
class president, Charles E. Martz,. =op- 
erated from the remainder of the .'class 
and presented, on their behalf, a large 
bouquet of daffodils to Dr. and Mrs. 
Ehlnger. Each et the instructors tried 
to waive the honor ;n behalf of the other, 
but Mr. Martz was equal to his respon- 
sibilities and did not present the flowers 
until both came forward together. The ■ 
yell of 1908 was given with a will by 
mingled masculine and feminine voices 
in a truly co-educational manner. The 
Secretary of the Class, Mist- Mabel Wal- 
lace, who bore the class standard, was 
the centre about which the class rallied 
to voice Its loyalty. 

Tho work ot tne "Gym." team ou the 
horizontal bar was excellent In the 
strength and agility displayed by the per- 
formers, who swayed, turned hand 
springs, hung by their knees and per- 
formed other feats requiring no smalt 
amount, of ■< muscular development and 
control. 

FROLICING FAIRIES,. 

The more serious work of the evening 
was enlivened toward its close by the 
arrival of a bevy of fairies whole bright 
dresses and tinkling tambourines made 
a bright and attractive scene. ' 

For prying into Queen Tltania's bower 
they were punished by being put Into a 
magic sleep. After a few moments of 
drowsiness the queen In .a gauzy white 
gown, glistening with stars, entered and 
touched each one with her wand to recall 
them to Wakefulness. Miss Beatrice Scott, 
took .this part Very gracefully. The other' 
fairies were: 'Misses Mabel Achey, Ruth 
Anderson,'. Helen Baker, Marie Branen, 
Katherine CpopeiV Emma Davis, Mary 
Floyd, Anna Gilford. Helen Griffiths, An- 
na Hewitt, Jean Hastie, Irene Hartman, 
Sara Kuntz. Llda Llndale, Mabel Math- 
ers, Minnie Moore, Jessie Mackey, Ber- 
tha Moyer, Mary O'Malley, Mary. Powell, 
Grace Phelps, Helen Smlth.Loulse Stlehl, 
Ethel Stewart, Fannie Struthers and 
Edna Shaffer. 

The music which accompanied this pret- 
ty scene was Liszt's "Polka Mazurka."- 
SKILLFUL TUMBLERS. ' 

In the final number of the programme 
the "gym" team won for Itself fresh 
laurels in acrobatics and pyramid form- 
ing. Under Mr. Mulllson's skillful lead- 
ing they turned all sorts of hand springs 
and somersaults, made themselves Into 
rolling balls and revolving bart wheels, 
stood head downward, supporting them- 
selves on their hands, which rested upon 
upturned feet and did many other things 
which won them unstinted praise. The 
work of Charles C. Carothers, who al- 
ways formed the apex of the pyramids 
and did some of the most difficult tum- 
bling, was especially applauded. The otn- 
er members of the "gym" team, all of 
whom are young men ot fine tithletlc abil- 
ity, are Herbert Taylor, Ovldio Pena, 
Louis J. Marcano, Andrew Russell, Ham' 
llton, Ezrom Palmer, John W. Leinlnger, 
Hiram P. Eves, Clinton H. Miller, Thos. 
W.Schaf and Chas. LeRoy Haines, c' 
OTHER PARTICIPANTS. 

OtheV participants in the entertainment 
were these: 

Class in Marching— Mabel Barnes, Maud. 
Barnes, Sara Bell, Emily Bieth, Helen 
Bean, Katherine Lenworth, Susie Faddis, 
Anne Hallman, Maud Hall, Mary How- 
adr, Anna Keath, Murjorle Kemery, Edith 
Megargee, Alva Miller, Frances Nellson, 
Mary O'Connell, Mary Passmore, Helen 
Reese, Laura Williams, Isabel yerkes, 
Anna Worrall. 

Senior Clubs— Miriam Alexander, Mar» 
garet Buchanan, Ruth Cook, Sara Chan- 
dler, Anna Duell, Dorcas Hoagland, Mary 
Johnson, Anna Koehler, Karlena Kruse, 
Frances North, Bertha Pyle, Llllle Paul, 
Sara Ramsey, Florence Rennie, Orna 
Roberts, Sara Ronk, Bettrice Ryden, 
Edna Shoemaker, Margaret Slack, Mary 
Sullivan, Florence ownsend, Hettle 
Thomas, Susie Williams, Esther Wilt, 
Ethel Wright, Elsie Yeakle. , 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 87 



MiQQie lear Class— Marie Anthony, 
Emily Adams. Bessie Bowers, Gladys 
Blackwood, Olive Bond, Georgia Bonne- 
ville, Elsie Baker, Helen Bantle, Anna 
Backes, Ethel Buzby, Bella Channel), 
Helen Carter, Letltla Davis, Kaiherine 
Dyakanoff, Kate Fetheroff, Amanda 
FlsheT. Edna Gill. Marian Godshall, Mlra 
Edwards, Mary Knight, Adessa Kestler, 
Edith Lawhead, Mary Leickle, Rachel 
Large, Ida Moyer, Grace Merritt, Eliza- 
beth Mahan, Stella Moyer, Edith Ober- 
holzer, Edna Parry, Helen Powell, Eliza- 
beth Rldgeway, Jennie Regar, Helen 
Royer, Louise Rockwell, Lulu Ratlldge, 
Laura .Roeschen, Margery Sellers, Re- 
becca Sparks, Arle Shean. Carrie Wilt,' 
Emily Willlams.MarJorie -Woodward, Ma- 
bel Wettllng, Emma Carpenter. 

Junior • Classy-Bertha Alderfer, Sara 
Bell, Eva Cook, Mary Clark,- adna Eldon, 
Rut h Fe rgus, Myrtle Given, Gladys Jam- 
nscV^nmi'"K'eatnY'Ruth- KdcTferTnEtlS' 
Layfleld, Alva Miller. Mary Moyer, Anna 
Mathers, Mary Mulligan. Helen McLaln, 
Edith Peters, Laura Ross, Jessie Swy-- 
melar, Louise ' Williams, Anna Worrall, 
Loralne Walker, Mabel Yearsley. • 
' Junior Dumb Bells (Boys)— Charles Bul- 
lock, 'Nlles 'Barcley, Garcia Cabera, E1-. 
wood. Gtofl, Jesse Hause, Edward' Kerr, 
Floy, Hawk, Irvln Kinsey.' Wm. <McCar- 
ter, Wm. McKInney, ' Lyman - Porter, 
•Wayne Ramsay, Alfred Taylor, Walter 
Smith, John Worrell, J. Wilmer Whit- 
lock, Donajd Nauld, Lewis Hartman, 
Morris Sypherd, Reuben Vandersl(ce, 
; Thomas Harper. Henry Hocker. 
"^tiddlers Bar^Bells— C.' Norman Asker, 
Leslie Burnell, Ralph " Collins, • Clarence 
Erb r Strickland Guest, Hurman Gyger, 
Shaner Happersett, Irey Holman, Ralph 
Hunsberger, Roy Jones, Walter Kimble, 
Clyde Lady, Addison Llpplncott, Paul 
Mathues. James Mathers, Lewis Parsels, 
Leland Relmer, Leland Reynolds. Lester 
Scotten, Wm. Selders, Wm. Stephens, 
Thomas Schaaf, Alexander Webb,, Harold 
White. Joiin Wilson. Wm. Yocum. 

Seniors Club Swinging — Hendrick- 
Adams, Irvin Alger, Herbert Bate, Geo. 
Bingaman, Robert Brinton, Joseph Buch-' 
anan. A. Homer Burket, Robert Cook, 
Vincent Coover, Roy Fisher, Geo. Gordy, 
Neeley Grahm, Faustln Hoover, Joseph. 
Malln, Charles Martz, Clifford Meloney,, 
Henry Messner, Clinton Miller, Nelson 
Mullen, Wallace Peters, Alfred Robertson,. 
Chester Ross. Edwin Smlleyl. Herbert 
Taylor. Walter Thlerolf, Howard Wollas- 
ton, Harry Wolf. 

Seniors, Marching— Hendrick L. Adams, 
Irvin G. Alger.' Clarence M. Bahr, J. Her-i 
bert Bate .Geo. C. Bingaman, Robt. - F. 
Brinton, Jos, T. Buchanan, . A. Homer 
Burket,, J. .Marshall Clark, Robert L. 
Cooke, .Vincent M. Coover, Walter S. 
Crouse, Wilmer Crouthamel , Wallace 
Dunehower. Walter L. Fegely, B. Roy 
Fisher. George E. Gordy, R. Neely Gra- 
ham, Clarence C. > Harvey; .H. Faustln 
Hoover, William K.!ntne>, Joseph E. 
Malln, Clifford R. Meloney.i Henry L. 
Messner, Clinton H. Miller,- Nelson C. 
Mullen, Wallace V- Peters, ' Alfred ""G 
Robertson, Chester H. Ross, Charles H., 
Rozelle. Edwin W. Smiley. Fred A. Tal- 
bot. Herbert W. Taylor, Walter R. 
Thierolf. Harry E. Wolf, Howard C; 
Wollaston. •' ' - - .' 



"AMULET" MARCH 1908 

The annual exhibition of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Training was held in 
the Gymnasium on Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary 28, and proved to be one of the best 
and most entertaining ever held. The 
exhibition was attended by one of the 
largest audiences ever seen in the "Gym.," 
and every one seemed greatly pleased 
with the numerous "stunts" performed. 
Each performance was skilfully executed 
and reflected much credit upon both the 
students and their teachers. The march- 
ing of the Senior boys, the dumb-bell ex- 
ercises by the Middfe-year girls, the es- 
thetic movements by the Senior girls, elec- 
tric club-swinging by Messrs. Mullison, 
Shortlidge, Martz and Taylor, and the 
Senior club-swinging were unusually well 
executed and evoked hearty applause from 
the audience. 

The "Gym." team performed manv verv 
difficult "stunts," their work being above 
the average. 

The exhibition was a credit to the de- 
partment and reflected much credit upon 
Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger and their abie as- 
sistants, Miss Davis and Mr. Mullison. 

The Physical Training Department gave their exhibition on 
February 28th introducing a new feature. Four young men 
swung Indian clubs when in the midst of their drill the gym 
lights were extinguished. At that moment concealed lights 
inside the clubs glowed in the dark providing a splendid effect. 
These clubs may be seen in the college museum. 









JjFFl 




a ■ •■'■ 


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-~-2a|^. .^a**^— ^H^R: 









28 February 1908 Exhibition 




28 Febuary 1908 Gym Exhibition 
1st. row (L. to R.): Bertha Pyle, Ethel Stannard, Helen Baker, Ruth Anderson, Leora Marple. 
2nd. row (L. to R.): Mabel Kelly, Elsie Reyner, Dorcas Hoagland, Louise Steele, Sara Kuntz. 



88 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



ANNUAL 

PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION 

DEPARTMENT 

OF 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER. PA. 
FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 5, 1909 

At 7.30 o'clock 



"Good education is that which ^ivcs to the body and to 
the soul all the perfection of which they arc capable-." 

— Pl.ATO. 

"I believe, personally, that dam-in;-' and gymnasia -s. like 
niusie, speech, sculpture, anil paintiiltr, arc onlj ililli r.nt 
modes of expression, anil that all (he feelings and emo- 
tions may !>.■ portrayeil through these ail-." 

Ini. Ii. A. Saiiiiknt, Harvard rnivcrsity. 



"All lime and nnaiey spent in training the body pays a 
larger interest than any other investment. 

W'M. K. ( I i.a psto.sk. 



2 MARCH 1909 



3 MARCH 1909 



ANNUAL PUBLIC 

' . DEMONSTRATION 

* : ■ ' ' " . ■> -i 

OF THE, , . I 

Physical Training Department 

, I ■ OF THE ' *j 

State Normal School, 

!., '•' IN THE 

GYMNASIUM, 
Friday Evening, March 5th, 

7.30 O'CLOCK. ' 
Including Military and Fancy Marching, 
Class Exercise In Swedish Gymnastics, way In what might be termed the chorus 



'*& 



In the gymnasium at the State Normal 
School the students are practicing for 
their annual demonstration, which occurs 
Friday night, and one of the special tea-', 
tures will be a serleB of folk dances,' 
unique and pretty. Those from Scotland 
and from Sweden will be given, In bright 
colored native costumes. 

Dr. C. E. Ehlnger, director of the gym- 
nasium, has been making a study of folk 
dances and finds that they all have a 
meaning, or had originally. There is at 
present a movement to revive them and 
understand them, and this adds an Intel- 
lectual feature to those of grace and 
beauty and physical development. ■• • 

Another novel feature Is a club swing- 
ing symphony, by seniors. There are 
eight lines of students who swing clubs, 
every line in a different way, during a 
part of the exercises, and all in the same 



Dumb Bells, Bar Bells and Indian Clubs. 
Exercises orr Parallel Bars, Pyramid 
Building and Acrobatics. Aesthetic and 
Folk Dances. , '■• 

Reserved Seats . . . ,. 60 cents 
General Admission ', '■'. . ,', 86 cents 
Children » . .<•>".-' . 16 bents 

Chart at Rupert's Book Store on and, 
after Wednesday. ■ .~ ■ 



VarhH tempos will be used, beginning 
with the.allegro, and passing through the 
list at Intervals, the whole being so ar- 
ranged that the effect will be harmoni- 
ous. 
Through long experience Dr. Ehlnger 



has learned to arrange the programmes 
In such a way that the specialists who 
come here to observe the latest methods 



PROGRAM 

I'AIIT I 

1 (a) Marching 

(I.) Swedish Folk Dance. "Bleking" 
I Named Iroin h province! 

Class of H I YounU Women 

2 Diiinl" Hells 

Vo- nft Men of Junior Class 

II Scotch Folk Dance. "Hiahland SchoHische' 

ia YounK Women of Senior Class 

4 Itar Hells 

Yomift Men of Middle Year Class 



In physical instruction, and the parents 
who come from a distance to see their 
sons and daughters take part will ■» like 
be pleased. 



TIME OF DEPARTURE OF 
TRAINS AND TROLLEYS 



Central Division leaves Market Street Station 
at 10.30 P. M. 

Main Line leaves Market Street Station at 
10.5GP. M. 

Dnwningtnwn Trolley leaves Trolley Station at 
in and 11 P. M. 

Philadelphia Trolley leaves Hiyh and flay 
Streets at 10.15 and 11.15 P. M. 

Kennett Square Trolley leaves High and Mar- 
ket Streets at 10.10 P.M. (Usual time is 10 
o'clock, but will be held ten minutes to ac- 
commodate this audience). 

Pars leave front of Gymnasium at 10.il."> to 
connect with Kennett Square Trolley, and at 
the close of the program to connect with 
other lines. 



PROGRAM 

I'AIIT II 



1 Marching 

Yonng Me 

2 Diuuli Bells 

.'la Young Women 



of Senior Class 



.1 Middle Year Class 



:$ Indian Club Swinging, Symphonic I'm 

IS Youiftlt Women and Younfi Men 

ol the Senior Class 



5 Swedish Gymnastic Day's Order 

,'llf Yonnft Women of Junior Class 



1 Dance Interpretation 

I'ii.l, Symphony. Andante Movemenl ( lleelhovsn) 

Arrnniied by Miss Margery Havis 

H YounD Women of Senior Class 



(i Parallel liars 

"Gym" Team 

Informut ion relative to train and trolley service on t lu- 
ff h page. 



(a) Acrobatics 
(l>) Pyramids 



-Gym" Team 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 89 



6 MARCH 1909 



In the Normal School Gymnasium the 
annual public demonstration of work In 
the physical training department was 
given last evening. A large audience of 
guests and students filled all the avail- 
able seating space and packed the gal- 
leries. The classes which appeared upon 
the progrumem did excellent work, and 
the whole entertainment' as a whole 
passed off most smoothly. Dr. and. Mrs. 
C. B. Ehlnger and their assistants, Miss 
Marjorle Davis and Fred Reith, receiv- 
ed many well deserved congratulations 
and carried home with them armfulls of 
flowers as substantial tokens of. the good 
will of their pupils. 

Miss Davis was assisted as pianist 
during the evening by Miss Amy Wells, 
of this place, physical instructor at the 
Girls' Normal School, Philadelphia. 

Among the audience were the follow- 
ing: 

VISITING TEACHERS OF GYMNAS- 
TICS. 

Miss Adele W. Adams, Friends' Select 
School, Philadelphia; Miss Margaret Rem- 
ington. Girls' High School, Philadelphia; 
Miss Grace E. Klngsberry, Temple Uni- 
versity, Philadelphia; Miss Anna S. Cress- 
man, Public Schools, Philadelphia; Miss 
Amv Wells, Girls' Normal School, Phtla*- 
delphia; Miss Elizabeth Broomall, Public 
Schools, Ardmore; Miss Flora Stevens, 
Darlington Seminary, West Chester; Miss 
Emily Smedley, Westtown Boarding 
School, Westtown- Geo. Mulllson, Tem- 
ple University, Philadelphia, - Spencer 
Bennett, Glen Mills School; Chester Ash, 
V. M. C. A., Coatesvllle; Isaac Porter, 
Wm. Penn Charter School, Philadelphia; 
Carl O. Hlerholzer, Public Schools, 
Philadelphia; F. A. Flnkledey, GIrard 
College, Philadelphia. 

. HUNG WITH BANNERS. 

The gymnasium looked most festive 
with its decoration of the banners of 
former classes, each of which had made- 
Its first appearance In public at an en- 
tertainment similar to this one. The 
Senior Class entered proudly bearing Its 
colors aloft, and the Middle-Year Class 
banner made its initial appearance at 
the head of a long llne'of members of 
the Class of 1910. 

The gallery was crowded with students 
long hefore the exhibition began. There 
was, of course, no room for chairs there, 
and the young people stood during the 
whole evening, their smiles never weary- 
ing, although the programme was long 
and the classes large. 

An orchestra of students furnished 
music while the audience was filing Into 
the chairs, which were placed in tiers at 
the southern end of the floor. 

The students who were to take part 
In the entertainment were grouped at the 
opposite side of the room, the girls sit- 
ting tailor fashion on the floor on the 
west side, the boys on the east. 

The young ladles who were to parti- 
cipate- In the Indian club drill were hon- 
ored with chairs and those who were 
to appear in the aesthetic gymnastics 
perched upon the small platform between 
the north windows. 

PRETTY SWEDE DANCE. 

At a signal from Miss Marjorie Davis 
at the piano, a class of fourteen girls 
wearing dark bloomers, white waists and 
black bows at their throats entered, with 
Mis. Ehlnger. Rapidly they were ' put 
through a march, wheeling and turning 
at the word of command. 

After a few minutes of this the pianist 
struck up a spirited air, the signal for the 
beginning of a pretty Swedish rolk 
Dance. The quaint figures and graceful 
steps of the girls were heartily applaud- 
ed, and the girls showed by the readi- 
ness and skill that their hearts were In 
this march more fully than they -had 
been In the more routine drill work. 

Sixteen young men of the Junior Class, 
wearing garnet sweaters and gray trous- 
ers, came next upon the floor, and in 
response to Dr. Ehlnger's direction is- 
sued through a small megaphone *went 
through the intricacies of a dumb bell 
drill. Applause echoed from gallery, as 
well as from the chairs occupied by 
guests of the school when the young 
men made spiders of themselves with 
arms and legs stretched at length upon 
the floor, when they promptly recovered 
themselves starting to their feet ready 
for the arm and back exercises. As they 
were passing from the room the young 
men halted In the doorway and gave the 
yell of 1911 with vigor of purpose and 
strength of lung. 



HIGHLAND LASSIES. 
One of the prettiest features of the 
evening was a Scotch Folk Dance (High- 
land Scliottiche) by twelve young women 
of the Senior Class. The girls wore plaid 
dresses, with gray scarfs over the shoul- 
der. The little dance was a graceful one, 
the girls going through the figures, two 
and two, exchanging partners and pass- 
ing around In a circling grand chain. 
The music was typically Scotch, and ex- 
cept that the piano could not reproduce 
the walling and groans. It might almost 
have been played on the bagpipe Itself. 
So much pleased were the people with 
these Highland lassies that they demand- 
ed an encore. The girls returned and 
courteously repeated a portion of the 
pretty dance. 

The young men of the Middle-Year 
Class executed an Intricate .drill with bar 
bells. The work was well done, and was 
cordially applauded, as was also the yell 
with which they left the room. 

The Swedish Gymnastic Day's order 
was quite varied in character. Including 
free gymnastics with hands, feet and 
head, marching and Jumping a low hur- 
dle. The girls were applauded heartily 
as they took the low bar gracefully, and 
then walked two by two on a pair of 
tracks placed like those of a railroad. 

This work was* done by thirty-six 
young women of the Junior Class. 

Miss Marjorle Davis directed tills class, 
and at the conclusion of the exercise she 
was presented with a large bouquet of 
delicate pink carnations and yellow daf- 
fodils as a token of the appreciation felt 
by the girls for her work in their be- 
half. 

FINE~TT?^5i~v70HTv. 
The "Gym Team," which includes thlr« 
teen of the school's most athletic yoking 
men was greeted with aooii.ise when it 
entered, accompanied "-.v Dr. Ehingtr's 
assistant. Relth. Parallel bars and their 
surrounding mattresses were placed in 
position In the centre of the room and in 
a few minutes the yo.nig men were malt- 
ing pin-wheels of themselves, standing 
head downward, supported by their 
hands, turning hand springs and going 
through other stunts whicn made some 
of the on-lookers hold Ineli- breath and 
sigh gratefully when the performers, onj 
by one. reached the lloor In safety. A 
skillfully built pyramid ended this num- 
ber, the applause being almost deafening 
The marching of the young men of the 
Senior Class, twenty-four l-.i number, was 
excellent and received hearty and well 
merited applause. Almost every revolu- 
tion was greet'.d with hand clapping, 
its execution being prompt and con- 
fident. In the main. 

The young men wore white suits, black, 
bow ties and black stripes on the outside 
seams of the trousers. Each wore a fed 
carnation, the class flower. 

SALUTED TH3Irt BANNICR. 
Thirty-two vounj men rf i lie Kiddle 
Year Class formed in a '•Irele about tht'r 
new banner of narnst and white carried 
bv the class sacreta.-v, .•lr>8 Marv Shh- 
low, and gave it a military salute In most 
dignified and precise manner. Having I" 
this way forma ly Introduced Hiclr colors 
to the, public tne girls formed in fo ir 
long lrnes and want tUmttKb :i dumb boll 
drill whioh Was execifod with unusujl 
accuracy and skill. Lach ft the girls 
wore her class olors. represented by 
white waist and garnet Tour in -hand tlca 
At the conclusion of the march w in 
which this nutcUT ended. Mrs. Khlngor 
was presented villi a houauet of gainet 
colored carnations and a lute rose bud.-*, 
The class veil ojn'ii i.ot 10 le nmllle-l 
from men Ion a'.n-mg toe Nal-» of liie 
evening. Glvtn >n high feminine tones i« 
contrasted sir', it,. J '«it:i i» »e foil by 
the you.ig men ■■ . ,__,.,»_ 

The Senior banaw, of brown and while, 
was- carried bv Miss Sr.rc. Murphy- ihr 
Secretary, at the lv>irl of a mixed '"ass 
of forty-eight ' young men and women, 
all clad In white and each wearing a leal 
carnation. Indian clubs were bkillfully 
used by these young pe-i.ile. to Ihe 
measured strains of tl"! piano and • x- 
cellentlv did thev follow the evolutions 
as directed by Dr. Ehlnger. 

At the conclusion of the drills and the 
march In which It ended, the secretary 
handed the banner to the class President, 
J Alexander Webb, while she carried In- 
stead a large bouquet of crimson roses. 
Side by side the class officers with these 
emblems marched the length of the class 
line and back to the entrance door of the 
gymnasium. Here they formed In a com- 
pact group around the president who led 
them In Btrenuously. voicing the class 



yell. As a final act me roses were pre- 
sented to Dr. Ehlnger.' 

The poetry of motion wis impersonateJ 
by eight young women of the Senior Class 
who in dress of white and of pale shades 
of blue, pink, green and yellow executed 
a series of aesthetic gymnastics. 

Beethoven's Fifth Sonata, in th eAn- 
dante movement, was played by Miss 
Davis, who had arranged the graceful 
dance as an Interpretation of the varying 
sentiments expressed by the music In 
the bright, animated passages the girls 
danced gaily, while to the sad, quiet 
parts of the composition their motions 
were languid and dreamy. This number 
was oonsldered one bf the most effective 
of the evening and it was applauded vlg-t 
orously. _ ' . 

The Gvm Team gave the final number 
on the programme. To spirited music the 
young men ran into the room and without 
pausing turned themselves as nearly as 
possible Into balls, and rolled from one 
end of the line of mattresses to the other. 
This done they executed handsprings and 
somersaults, with variations and wounfl 
up with a pyramid of fine proportions. 

With the entertainment over it took but 
a few minutes for the room to be cleared 
of students and guests, though many per- 
sons lingered long enough to press w-arm 
congratulations upon Dr. and Mrs. 
Ehlnger and their assistants. 

The names of the students in the vari- 
ous performances are these: - 

Scotch Folk Dance— Highland Schot- 
tlsche— Mabel Barnes, Maud Barnes, Clara 
Bobbin, Gladys Blackwood. Belle Chan- 
nell. Helen Carter, Nina Edwards.Meave 
Lovelace, Lcona Kane, Edith Oberholzer 
Blanche Smith. Mildred Wagoner. 

■Marching and Folk Dance^Iessle An- 
derson, Sadie Burbage. Mary Clark, Mil- 
dred Elliott. Bessie Flumn. Laura Green, 
Sophia Greenburg. Marguerite Gery, Hen- 
rietta Hlbschrhan, Marian ' Head, Ruth 
Kulp, Maud Mack, Reglna Longacre.An- 
na Mlchlner. Lldie McCrone, Agnes Mc- 
Clurg, Ethel Plersol, Francis Slgler. Er- 
lyn Taylor, Laura Wakler, Stella 
Unangst, Vera Wynn, Mabel Yearsley. 

Middle Year Dumb Bells— Jennie 
Adams, Helen Bean, Jane Bickle, Flor- 
ence Beaumont. Pauline Bartol, Mar- 
guerite Ball, Mary Caldwell, Hannah 
Cramer, Eva Cook, Esther Denlson, Lottie 
Eckman, Myrtle Given, Eva Groff, Mar- 
garet Gottshall, Susie Heaghey, Eva 
Hewitt, Ruth Kocher, Elizabeth Krauss, 
Frances Lelngang. Edith Megargee, Ag- 
nes- McClure, Sadie Musselman, Anna 
Mathers, Irma Philips, Mary' Passmore, 
Edith Phlpps, Mary Pettlgrew, Florence 
Slack, Bertha Smedley, Mary Shallow, 
Margery Woodward, Alma Wallace, Mary 
Wettllng, Laura Williams, Mabel Yeagr 
ley, Loraine Walker. 

Swedish Days Order— Edna AtUx, Jessie 
Anderson, Sadie Burbage, Ruth Bratton, 
Abigail Blackburn, Fanny Cassell, Mary 
Clarke. Anna Cope, Pearl Dutton, Mil- 
dred Elliott, Bessie Flumn, Marguerite 
Gery, Sophia Greenburg, Grace Haider- 
man, Marlon Head. Edna Hull. Hen- 
rietta Hlbschman, Ruth Kulp, Reglnla 
Longacre, Sophia Merritt, Anna Mich- 
ener, Mary McCrowe, Lldie McCrowe, 
■Itelta O'Brien, Ethel Piersol, Mabelle 
Pemoch, Helen Reese, Eleanor Robinson, 
Margaret Purcell, Evelyn Saylor, Jesse 
Swymelar, Muriel Stevens, Lucy Sleymer, 
Sara Thompson, Stella Unangst, Ella 
Weidman, Margaret Worrall, Clara Wil- 
liamson, Mary Wltherow, Lillian West, 
Helen WilllamB, Vera Wynn, Laura 
Walker. 

Interpretation Dance — Marie Anthony, 
Bessie Bowers, Letltia Davis, Jane Mil- 
lane, Rebecca Sparks, Martha Stewart, 
"Mabel Wettllng, Emily Williams. 
JUNIOR YOUNG Ml.i. 

Dumb bell drill— Arlo Ansted, Daniel 
Bowers. U. F. Denwnrth. Vincent Freed.' 

Robertl3oda7Tlorence*Turst7~TW»e"*Oang- 
wer. Chaa. Hollenbach. Wm. Kelley, Frank 
Soobolt. Homer Teamer, Joslah Tyson, 
John Tubbs. Catelle Van Pelt, Earle Wat- 
aon, Haymond WIlHams. 

MIDDLE YEAR YOUNG MEN. 
Bar bells — Arthur Anderson, - Albert 
Blackburn. Joe. Bntterweck.LeRoy Halnea, 
Tbomaa Harper, John Holllnger, Ira Holr 
rani, R. A. Hummel. Edward Kerr, Owynne 
Geller, James Koontz. Wllmer Krall, Mm.' 
MaeCarter, Isaac MacCollum, Eugene Mac- 
Gulre, Harry Mover, John Qiilmby.' Ar- 
thur Reeves, Lewis Rosser, Wm.-, Shore, 
Orvll Smltb, Walter Smith, Calvin Wag- 
oner. 



90 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



SENIORS, CLUB SWINGING; 

Young Women — Emily Adams, Olive 
Bond. Georgia Bonneville, Emma Carpen- 
ter. Katherine Dyakanoff, Kate Fetberolf, 
Ailessa Kistler, Mary Knight, Etliabeth 
Million, Julia Meaker. Edna Parry, Lulu 
Ratledge, Martha Reeves, Jennie Reger, 
Elizabeth Rldgeway. Loul6e Rockwell, 
Laura Roeschcn, Marjorle Sellers, Mav 
Smiley. Edith Stover, Muriel Tyson, Ruth 
Walbert. 

Young Men — Norman G. Acker. Merle 
W. Aajper. Leslie S. Burnell, J. Ralph Col- 
lins, Clarence L. Erb. F. Rein Freed, El- 
lison H. Gaynian. Strickland T.Ouest. Fur- 
man H. Gyger, Hunsberger Ralph. Walter 
J. Kimble, Clyde H. Lady. Addison M 
Lipplncott, James II. Mathers. E. Paul 
Mnthues, J Walter Reiner, Leland F. Rey- 
nolds. J. Lester Scotton, Willis E. Selders, 
Grant H. Supplee. J. Alexander Webb 
Harold H. White, John Q. Wilson, William 
K. Yocum. 



"GYM" TEAM. 
Parallel bars and acrobatics, pyramids— 
Wm. MncCnrter, Isaac MacCollum, Vincent 
Freed. Rein Fredd, J. M. Smith, Lyman 
Porter, Ellison Gnyman. Charles Bullock, 
Daniel Bowers, Francis'' Holman, Irwin 
Kinsey, Esrom Palmer, Thomas ' Schaaf 
(not In acrobatics). 

SENIOR YOUNG MEN. 
Military Marching— Norman ■ G. Atker, 
Merle W. Asper, I/eslie 3. Burnell, J.; 
Ralph Collins, Clarence L. Erb. F. Rein 
Freed, Ellison H. Gayman, Strickland T. 
Guest. Furman H. Ggyer, Ralph Huns-. 
ehrger, Walter J. Kimble, Clyde H. Lady. 
Addison M. Lipplncott, James M. Mathers, 
K. Paul Mathues, J. Walter Reiner, Le- 
land F. Reynolds. J. Lester Scotton, Wil- 
lis E. Selders, Grant H. Supplee, J. Alex- 
ander Webb. Harold H. White, John G. 

Wilson. William K. Y'ocum. 




5 March 1909 Gym Exhibition 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 91 




Coach Frederick Reith with 1910 Gym Team 




92 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



The Ijoys classes have started work for 
tlie exhibition, and will from now on lx- 
perfecting the old movements and learn- 
ing new; the Juniors with the dumb-l)ells, 
Middlers with the bar-ljells, and Seniors 
with the 'Indian clubs. Dr. Ehinger has 
offered two prizes to the Senior fellow-. 
The first to the l>est club swinger and the 
second m the one making the greatest 
pi ogress. 

Work for the "Gym" team is also wi- 
der way L'nder the able instruction of 
l)r. Ehinger and Mr. Harrington the fel- 
lows are doing well on both the parallel 
bars and living rings. 

a imr of Brparturr of Srgfae ant) 3roIlrya 



Central Division leaves Market Street 
Station IU8P. M. 

Main Line i©a»es Market Street Marlon 
fit 10.(14 P. M. 

CjBtesville and Downingtuwo trolley 
leaves Trolley Station at 9-30 and ll.no 
P.M. 

Philadelphia Trolley leaves Ulirh and 
Oay Streets at hi.15 and 11.18 P. M. 

Krnnett g.|unre Trolley leave* Htgli 
and Market Streets at 10 P. M. 



Annual 

$ubltr SrmnnHtratfon 



jUrpartntfttt 

of 

#lujsiral tFraimnn, 



Btatt Normal ^diool 

^Brst (Cl)rHtrr. $Ia. 



iFriiiaii turning, iKarrlj 3, 1911 

At ftrnrn-lhirtii (8'rlatk 



"We are ahvays on the road towards gelling 
control of the mind 7ohen we are training and 
disciplining the body." 

— Win. James 



Program 

}Jart 3 

/ MARCHING 

Class of 21 Young Women 

j DUMB BELLS 

Young Men of Junior Class 

3 FANCY DANCING 

20 Young Women of Senior Class 

I BAR BELLS 

Young Men bf Middle Year Class , 

(a) SWEDISH GYMNASTIC DA Y'S 

5 ORDER 

(b) HUNGARl. IN FOLK D. INCH 

24 Young Women of Junior Claw 

6 PARALLEL BARS 

"Gym" Team 

Information relative to train and trolley service on (lie 
fourth page. 



"All through the life of a pure-minded but 
feeble bodied man, his path is lined with memory's 
grave stones which mart the spot where noble en- 
ter pi ises perished for lack of physical vigor to 
embody them in deeds. ' ' 

— lIo> ace Mann 



■program 

JJart 3J3J 

/ MARCHING 

Young Men of Senior Class 

2 DUMP, PELLS' 

jfi Young Women of Middle Year 
Class 

3 INDIAN CLUB SWINGING 

32 Young Men and Young Women of 
Senior Class 

7 ATHLETIC PAGEANT 

Si v Young Men of Senior Class 

5 FLYING RINGS 

"Gym" Team 

*lty request. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 93 



"AMULET" MARCH 1911 

'I he annual public demonstration ot the 
Physical Culture Department was held in 
the Normal School Gymnasium Friday 
evening, March 3. Xo special feature of 
gymnastics was developed, but the gen- 
eral line of work showed excellent drill 
and proved instructive to all present — 
both fellow students and townsmen, each 
une showing his appreciation by enthusi- 
astic applause. The program was as fol- 
lows : 

PART I. 

1. Marching — Class of 24 young women. 

2. Dumb Bells — Young men of Junior Class. 

3. Fancy Dancing — 20 young women of the Sen- 

ior Class. 

4. Bar Bells — Young men of Middle year class. 

5. (a) Swedish Gymnastic Day's Order, 
(b) Hungarian Fold Dance. 

6. Parallel Bars — "Gym" Team. 

PART II. 

1. Marching — Young men of Senior Class. 

2. Dumb Bells — Young women of Middle year 

class. 

3. Indian Club Swinging — Seniors. 

4. Athletic Pageant — Six young men of Senior 

class. 

5. Flying Rings — "Gym" Team. 

Each number of the program was 
greatly enjoyed, and no one could be 
more highly commended than the other, 

each reflecting great credit upon its in- 
structor. 

The 1912 class banner made its debut 
amid great applause, and the Middlers 
may well l>e proud of such a banner. 




1 



Coach Albert D. Harrington With 1911 Gym Team 




94 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



26 FEBRUARY 1912 



AMULET" FEBRUARY 1912 



ANNUAL PUBLIC 

DEMONSTRATION 

OP THE 

DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICAL .CULTURE, 

State Normal School, 
Friday Evening, March -1st, 

AT .7.30 O'CLOCK. 

All phases o£ the work of this depart- 
ment will be represented, with Dumb 
Bells, Bar Bells, Indian Clubs, Military 
and Fancy Marching, Class Dances, 
Folk Dances, Athletic Dances, Aesthetic 
Dancing, Exercises on Parallel Bars, 
Flying Rings, Acrobatic, etc. 

Chart and Tickets at Rupert'a on and 
after Tuesday. 

Reserved Seats, 6Pc; General Admis- 
sion, 25c: Children. 15c. fb26n5t 



The annual gymnastic demonstration 
will take place Friday evening, March I, 
and the various classes are busy getting' 
in shape for the part they will lake. 
Some new features will be introduced 
this year. The athletic dances of the 
Senior young men have never been seen 
here before. They will undoubtedly 
prove most interesting and attractive. 

The gym. team will l>e one of the best 
for years, and will show advanced and 



novel exercises. Folk and fancy dances 
will be shown by the young ladies. All 
the regular work will be exhibited in well 
drilled and attractive exercises. There 
is every reason to believe that the 
demonstration will not only be up to the 
high standard shown in the past, but will 
excel all previous efforts. Ample pro- 
visions for reserved seats and accommo- 
dation for a large audience will be made. 
Remember the date, March 1st. 



ANNUAL PUBLIC DEMONSTRATION 

DEPARTMENT OF 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 




STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 1, 1912 

AT SEVEN-THIRTY O'CLOCK 



1. MAEOHINO 



PROGRAM 
Part 1 

tliii it 20 Young Women 



2. DUMB BELLS 

Young Men of Junior Class 

3. (a) FEEE GYMNASTICS. Swedish Day's Order 
•(b) SWEDISH FOLK DANCE 

"The Weaving of the Flax" 
24 Young Women of Junior Class 
THE WEAVING OF THE FLAX. 

The" .recreational life' of the' Swedish peasants is "strongly 
colored By their daily occupations, and the weavers have here 
pictured in their dance the several features of their work with 
the flax.' The little running step which unifies the various 
figures /may be likened to the thread on which bends are 
strung. * 

Figure^ one represents* the workers pulling up the flax and 
casting it into piles. 

Figure two. shows them throwing a hank of the flax over a 
hackle or comb and pulling it through the prongs or teeth 
to straighten the fibers. ,,.,.. 

In figure three the spinning wheel is illustrated by four 
of the dancers moving in a circle while the fifth stands 
apart and by motions' of hand and foot guides and operates 
the wheel. s 

Figure four pictures the weaving of the linen, one "dancer 
acting at_ the shuttle on its journey to and fro among the 
threads. 

In figure five :the, weavers; their work completed, give way 
to their natural instincts for joyouB physical activity. 



"Self culture aims at perfection,, and is tJie highest fulfill- 
m'e'rif of the laVs' «f God: Tl means perfect symmetrical to' 
velnpment of all our powers of body, mind and spirit. — 
Goethe. 

"Every movement is an idea expressed by the ^dy." 

"Health should be valued a. next to, a good «oi».cienee i but 
the more healthy the better conscience. — W . 1. W»™- 

"Physical training is as Inseparable a part of education as 
the foundation of the hwise. 



4. ATHLETIC DANCING 

12 Young Men of Senior Class 

5. (a) DUMB BELLS 

(b) SWEDISH FOLK DANCE. "Klappdanj" 
28 Young Women of Middle Year. Class 

Part II 



1. (a) PARALLEL BARS 
(b) ACROBATICS 

"Gym" Team 



TIME OF DEPARTURE OF TRAINS AND TROLLEYS. 

Central Division leaves Market Street 

Station at 10.42 P.M. 
Main Line leaves Market Streei Station 

at 10.56 PiM. 

Coateivllle and Downingtown Trolley 

leaves Ttolley' Station at 9.60 and 

11.00 P.ljfi. 
Philadelphia Trolley leaves High and 

flay 3ft*ets - at 9.45, 10.15 and 

11.15 P.M. 
Kennett Square Trolley leaves High 

and Market Streets at 10.00 P.M. 



2. AESTHETIC DANOING. Gavotte Boyal 

12 Young Women of Senior Class 

3. BAR BELLS 

Young Men of Middle Year Class 

V (») MARCHING 

Young Men of Senio. Claaa 

(la) CLUB SWINGING 

Young Men and 24 Young Wom< i of Senior Class 



B. FLYING RINGS 



"Gym" Team 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 95 



2 MARCH 1912 



• The •Normal'- School- gymnasium' last 
evening w us gay with class banners and 
pennants, and well tilled with guests tvlio 
en.ioy the athletic side ot' education. It 
was the annual public demonstration of 
work by the school's department of phy- 
sical training, and as such called to- 
gether many former - student*, physical 
directors and friends of the pupils, -all ot 
whom had only warm words of praise for*, 
the well carried out programme. , 

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ehingcr with their- 
assistants, Albert D. Harrington and Miss 
Kachel P. Johnston, had worked hard to 
make the affair a success and that they 
ha- the co-operation of the pupils 
was realized by all who were present. - 

The bank of flowers that adorned the 
piano at the conclusion of the entertain- 
ment spoke for Itself of the appreciation 
felt by the pupils for their teachers' work. 

The evening's exercises were marked 
by a finish Of execution and promptness 
In response to command. . Particularly 
pleasing were the Swedish Folk Dances 
and the athletic dancing by both girls', 
and boys' classes. For tliose of athletic 
tastes the work of the gym. teams proved 
particularly Interesting, showing excel- 
lent command over muscles and control, 
of nerve, 

VISITING PHYSICAL DIRECTORS. 

Among the most Interested spectators 
were these physical directors: Spencer 
M. Bennett, Atlantic City Public Schools; 
S. F. Jenkins, West Chester Y. M. C. A.: 
Bliss Ella Pertuch, Girls' Normal School. 
Philadelphia; Miss Amy Wells, Girls' 
Normal School, Philadelphia; Mlse Wini- 
fred Blake. Girls' Normal School. Phila- 
deli hia; Miss Grace Bacon. Westtown 
Friends' School: Miss Elizabeth Broomall. 
I.ansdownc Public Schools: Miss Sara 
Martin, Berwvn; Fred. Finkelday, Girard 
College, Philadelphia: Fred. Reith, Public 
Schools, Philadelphia. 
N '•• SPIRITED MUSIC. 

'' During the evening spirited music ac- 
companied most of the exercises, Mi«. 
Ehluger and Miss Johnson taking turns 
at the piano. • 

During the- athletic dancing by the 
Senior boys Charles Harding, one of their 
number, furnished the musk 1 . 

A class of twenty young women opened 
the entertainment with a march In which 

fierfect time was kept to the music and 
ntricate figures were "executed. In an 
accurate manner. ' 

Wearing garnet sweaters and gray 
trousers to show their class loyalty a, 
class of Junior young men showed what 
may be done with dumb bells to Interest 
an audience, and from the way the audi- 
ence applauded it was evident that thejr 
succeeded in their endeavor. 
WEARING FLAX. 
Twenty-four young women of the Junior! 
Mass. led by Miss Johnston, went through 1 
,a series of free gymnastics of the "Swed-i 
lsh Days' Order. This was followed by, 

• u pretty Swedish Folk Dance." "The, 
Weaving of the Flax." * , 
,' The first figure of the dance represent-; 

ed the workers pulling up the flax and 
casting It Into piles. 

In the second figure the dancing group* 
represented the throwing of a hank of 
flax over the hackle or comb, and pulling 
It through to straighten the fibre. 

In the third figure four dancers moved 
In a circle to represent the spinning 
wheel, while the fifth standing at one; 
side illustrated guiding of the thread. 
, Weaving the linen" was Illustrated by 
one girl acting as Vbe shuttle, journeying 
to and among the threads. In the last 
1 figure the .workers have completed their 
tasks and enjoy a season of frolic. The 
dance was full of spirited motion and 
energy, and was marked Ijy accuracy of. 
time and rhythm. ' ' * 

Twelve young men of the' Senior class 
wearing white suits with black bow ties 
and black stripes on their trousers gave an 
exhibition of "athletic dancing." The' 
figures wen; exceedingly graceful and the. 
agile handsprings and vigorous arm move- 
ments suggested the athletic field rather 
than the dance hall. 

An exercise with dumb bells by a class 
of 28 young women of the middle year 
class, led by Mrs. Ehlnger, was followed 

• by a second Swedish. Folk Dance, "The 
Kloppdeurs." It takes Its name from the 
rhythmic handclapping, which has .Its. 
place at certain parts of the dance. 

As the girls retired from the floor two 
bouquets of roses, one pink and one while, 
were' handed to Mrs. Ehlnger and Mies 
Johnston. 



ON PARALLEL BARS. < ' 

After a brief interval the second hnlf 
or the programme was opened by the 
-Own-Team." led by Mr. Harrington 
Dr. Ehinger's assistant. Mattresses and 
parallel bars were brought Into the cen- 
tre of »he Moor and the youths In blue 
bweatcre and golden monograms per- 
formed various "stunts" requiring both 
nerve and muscle. When Henry Bickle 
walked the bars on his hands with feet 
waving gracefully aloft ' the audience" 
cheered vociferously, but interest culmi- 
nated in the diving contest. Two' young 
men on hands and knees took position 
In the centre of the floor and over them 
one after another of the team went, 
alighting on their hands and turning a 
handspring. Every few minutes another 
youth was called to kneel and be dived 
over until nine were In a row on the 
floor. Even then several of the team 
dived clear of the row by making a long 
run for II. When one young man struck 
the middle of the row and slid over the 
backs of the "bunkers" the applause 
was even greater than for the perfect 
work. Messrs. Bickle and Ncger were 
particularly daring In the acrobatics 
which followed and the illustrations giv- 
en by the leader. Mr. Harrington, were 
marvels ot agility and muscular con- 
trol. 

A bouquet of white roses showed the 
appreciation felt by tho class "for" the 
leader's work. 

Graceful dancing steps by a class of 
twelve senior maidens, wearing black 
waists and black ties was an exceeding- 
ly pretty illustration of the "Poetry of 
Alntion." 

l>r. Elringcr led a class of young men 
ol. the Middle Year in bar bell exercises 
and laler directed, a march 'by Senior 
young men. i 

LICD BY BLIND YOUTH. 

The class was led by Martin Kurtz, 
who Is almost totally blind, but who. by 
strict attention to the spoken command, 
made every turn with accuracy.* 

After the white clod youths liad wheel- 
ed and turned, advanced and retreated 
with precision, they were joined by twen- 
ty-four senior maidens in white dresses 
wearing the class colors, old rose and 
black, at the throat. The girls were led 
by the class seceretary, Miss Beulah 
Bradley, carrying the class banner. 

In -alternate- rows tho boys and girls 
went through an Indian club drill, end- 
ing in a march and the/class yell.. The 
class presented Dr. Ehlnger with a 
! bouquet at the conclusion of the num- 
■Ler. 

The flying - rings were' ■ brought Into 
requisition for the gym. team in the 
linal number on the programme. 

Under Mr. Harringtons direction the 
youths swung with equal ease by hands 
and by feet and made numerous neat 
"tlyaways" and "cut-offs." 

THOSE TAKING PART. 

Lists of- those who took part follows: 

Class Marching— Esther . Andrews, 

Hannah Barry. Mary Carey. Clara De- 
wees. Marie Eldridge. Mildred Evans, 
Mudallnc' Evans. Charlotte Eberly. Ko- 
maine Gross, Hazel Hotchkiss. Eliza Im- 
ler, -Jessie Johnson, Bessie KauCfman, 
Dortohy Kraft, James Leeds. Jennie 
Lewis, Elizabeth Lear, Helen McCarty, 
Helen Mendenhall, Marian Pike, Caro-" 
line Park. Ada Stanford, Iona Stone, 
Margaret Tool. 

Junior Boys in Dumb Bell Drill— Ed- 
win Bearer, Herman Bishop, William 
Cope, Herbert Dic-hl, Charles Farabaugh, 
Robert Harclerode, Reginald Harding, 
Stahmen Hayden, Luther Haverstock, 
Charles Hemmlg, Norman Jones. Nor- 
man Lack, Irvln Lambert) Harlan Mil- 
ier, Warren Rhoads, Frank Rice, Alonzo 
Ktegman, Morgan > Rath,'- David Saylor, 
William Wilson. ...-._ - 

Junior Girls—Day's Order and Folk 
Dance— Viola Worley, Edith Heinhold. 
Katie Waif, Mary Howard, Clara James, 
Anna C. Neyney, Bessie Daniel, Marie 
Boothroyd. Eliza. Lawrence. Margaret 
Br-dy. Dora Passmore, Verda Smith, 
Maragret Parry, Romalne Grose, Estelle 
Ulrlch, Jennie Lewis, ' Evelyn Robers,' 
Lulu aBldwln, 'Elizabeth Wood, Florence 
Hughes. Helen Mendenhall. Helen Dunn, 
Josephine Taylor, Elizabeth Waltz. 

Senior Boys In Athletic Dance— Samuel 
Faust. Raymond Gottshall, William Han- 
nura, -William Hellings, Henrv Bickle, 
Slover Kulp, Mark Nace, Ammon Nein, 
Stanley O'Neal, John Tyson, Edgar Ulsh, 
Mark Wltmer. 



Dumbell and. Eoiu Pance^_== Mario Ar- 
nold, Mamie Berlin. Hilda Chambers. 
Ella Clark. Anna Crumbaugh. Marian 
Cook, Anna May Dunham, Marguerite 
Oery. Emma Guy, Kathryn Hoffman, 
Ernia. Llchtenwalner. Eva Latch, Jessie 
Lennon, Grace Mechler, Edith Moore. 
Edith Moore. Mildred Morgan, Letitla 
Phlpps, Wllma Parry, Esther Peters, 
Kathryn Happ, Eara Schrader. Eliza- 
beth Stevenson. Emily Taggart. Helen 
Weaver. Emma Wiekersham. Dorothv 
lounginan, Elizabeth Zuckwerdt. 

"Gym" Team— Clarence Gill, Harry 
P-lckle. Mark Wltmer, Frank Kachelrles, 
E. B. Walton, Marvin Moyer, Frank Fin-, 
ncgan, Leroy Brooke, Alonzo Stegman, 
Lloyd Neal, Thomas McKlnney, John 
Neger. 

Senior Girls Dance • Roval Gavotte- 
Frances Grugan. Pearl Denton. Hazel- 
tlno Wilson, Isabella Walker, Edna Tav- 
lor. Margaret Cassell, Hattie Swavely, Es- 
ther Margolis, Louise Wagner, Helen 
Young. Blunce Fairlamb. 

Middle Year Boys in Bar Drill— William 
Andreas. Guy Barnd. Leroy Brooke. Wil- 
laul Barcus, Walter Bush, Justice Chris- 
well. Howard Davis, OUn Evans, Lawr- 
ence Davis, Lawrence Green. Wallace 
Driehause, Frank Cachelrles, Davis 
Knauer. Sylvester Kerwlck. Francis Mor- 
gan. Edmund Pechln, Thomas- Shore, 
Thomas Walsh. E. B. Walton. 

Senior Boys in Marching— Comley Bo- 
dine. Frank Burge. Francis Bustln. Arch- 
er Campbell. Samuel Faust, Clarence 
Furst. Clarence Gill, Raymond Gottshall, 
William Hannum. Louis Hertz, Charles 
Harding, William Hellings, Abraham 
Himmelbergcr, Vernon Johnston. Russell 
Jones, William Kellev. Paul Kocber.Sto- 
ver Kulp. Martin Kurtz, Edmund Lvnch, 
Robert Mitchell, John Murphv, Mark Nace 
Ammon Nein, Stanley O'Neal, Joseph. 
Parry, Robert Patterson. Jacob Rhoads, 
Morris Syphcrd, John Tyson, Edgar Ulsh, 
Mark Witmer. Ralph Wright. 

SENIORS IN CLUB SWINGING. 

Girls— Kdna Swartley. Edith Ilgenfritz, 
Katharine Mc.Mahon. Alice Steward. Mary 
Thomas, Nellie Lukcns, Emma. Davis, 
Edith Rich, Bertha Richards. Lillie Ma- 
hon. Emily .-*eters, Bertha Gravelle.Ger- 
triide Schell. Blanche White. Grace 
Moyer, Kathleen Brennan. Ida Lee. Clara 
Phipps. Elmu Althousc, Katherlne Comer- 
for.]. Amedla Hughes, Evelyn Smith, Ra- 
chel Walker. Inez Whitney. 

Buys— Comley Bodlne. Francis Bustln, 
Archer Campbell. Clarence Fursl, Ray- 
mond Gottshall, William Hannum, Hell- 
ing William. Louis Hertz, Charles Hard- 
in*,'. Uussrll klnnen WilUnm KAllev. Paul 

'KocherV stover Kulp. Martin Kurtz,~Ed- 
mund Lynch. Mark Nace, Ammon Nein. 
Stanley O'Neal. ' Joseph Parrv. Jacob 
Rhoads.. John Tyson, Edgar Ulsh, Mark 
Wltmer. - ' 



Young Man From Delaware Breaks 

Collar Bone In Long; Jump. 

During the gymnastic entertainment at 
(the Normal School last evening one of 
'the young men, a member of the Gym. 
Team, broke a collar bone. The unfor- 
tunate one was Thomas McKlnney. of 
Stanton, Del., one of the star members 
of tho team. The accident occurred dur- 
ing the dive over the backs of a number 
of crouching students and was occasion- 
ed by the young man bringing bis knee 
up too far and too suddenly and falling 
"upon it after successfully making tl.c 
long leap. So quietly was the thing done 
that the audience as a whole knew noth- 
ing of the accident. The young nan 
was noticed leaving the gymnasium ilojr 
,by a few persons but no one realized 
that he was hurt and most of the spec- 
tators were so busy watching whit came 
next that even his going was not lna-di- 
f ed by many. 

Much sympathy was expressed for him 
by fellow students when it -was learned 
that he was injured. 



96 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



15 FEBRUARY 1913 



Gymnastic Exhibition at the Normal. 

Dr. C. E. Ehlnger, director of the phy- 
sical training department at the West 
Chester State Normal School, assisted 
by Mrs. Ehlnger and Miss Harding, as- 
sistants In the gymnasium, is preparing 
for the annual exhibition of gymnastics, 
class work, etc., to be given in the Nor- 
mal School gymnasium, on Friday night, 
February 3Stli, when several hundred 
young men and women representing the 
different classes will appear In jarious 
movements, drills, etc. 

It is being planned to mane tne coming 
exhibition bigger and better than ever 
before, as Dr. Ehlnger remarks enthu- 
siastically. There will be the usual 
marches, dumb-bell and wand drills. In- 
dian club exercises, with many new folk 
dances, and other stunts that are bound 
to entertain. 



26 FEBRUARY 1913 

Annual Public Demonstration 

OF THE WORK OF THE 

Department of Physical Training, 

IN THE 

GYMNASIUM 

OF THE 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 
FRIDAY EVENING, FEB. 28 

AT 7.30 O'CLOCK. 

Demonstration of Plain ana Fancy 
Marching. Exercises with Indian Clubs. 
Dumb Bells, Bar Bells and Rings. Work 
in Free Gymnastics. Aestnetiq and Folk 
Dancing. 

ADMISSION'— Reserved seats, 50c; 
general admission, 25c; children (not 
occupying reserved seats), 15c. 

Chart at the Rupert Store. fb25n4t 



Annual Public Demonstration 



PROGRAM 

PART I 



1 (a) MARCHING 

Class of 24 Young Women 

(b) DANISH FOLK DANCE 

" Dance of Greeting." 



2 BAR BELLS 



Class of 16 Young Men of 3d Year 



3 (a) FREE GYMNASTICS 

Swedish Day's Order 

lb) SWEDISH FOLK DANCE. "OXDANSEN" 

Class of 18 Young Women 



4 DUMB BELLS 



5 INDIAN DANCE 



Class of 24 Young Men of 2d Year 



Class of 20 Young Women 



6 EXERCISES ON SIDE HORSE 

"Gym Team" 

PROGRAM 



PART II 



1 EXERCISES WITH WOODEN RINGS 

Class of 18 Young Women of 3d year 



2 MARCHING 



Young Men of Senior Class 



3 INDIAN CLUB SWINGING 
k Young Women and Young Men of Senior Class 



4 AESTHETIC DANCING " ECHO ' 



Class of 6 Young Women of Senior Class 
Led by Miss Margaret Harding 



DEPARTMENT OF 

Physical Training 



5 PARALLEL BARS 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Weat Chester, Pa. 

Friday Evening, Feb. 28, 1913 

AT SEVEN-THIRTY O'CLOCK 



" Gym Team" 



The "Gym" Team. 
In the report of the annual demonstra- 
tion of physical training at the West 
Chester State Normal School, held in the 
gymnasium on Friday evening, as pub- 
lished in Saturday's Local News, bv an 
oversight, the names of the young men 
who did such crediteble work on the 
si^e horse and the parallel bars, were 
omitted, but are now published, as fol- 
lows: Frank Kachelrics. of Coalport. 
Clearfield county; Frank S. Finegan, 
Ashley, Luzerne county; Lloyd C. Neal, 
Newtown Square, Delaware county; Ir- 
win Shoffstai, Tremont, Schuylkill 
county; Harlan J. Miller. Honeybrook, 
Cnester county; Marvin H. Moyer, Tel- 
ford, Montgomery county; Adalfo Alva- 
rez. San Juan, Porto Rico, and Frank A. 
Long, the assistant In the gymnasium. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 97 



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98 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 

ANNUAL 

PUBLIC 

DEMONSTRATION 



*£laf.<? confidants of air and exercise." 

— G*«. Matthew Adams. 



PROGRAM 



* * * 



Srpartmrnt of 

PjyHiatl ©rawing 



PART II 



i marching 



16 Young Men of Senior Clue* 



2 INDIAN CLUBS 

32 Young Men and Young Women of Senior Claaa 



State Normal School 

West Chester, Pa. 



J SHOUT WANDS 



, THE POPrY DANCE 



Claaa of 24 Young ffostl 



IJ Young Women of Senior Claaa 



§u!uTbm} foirmttg. fSttrrh 7X\),' 14 



s parallel bars 



at gruru-tbirtu. n'rlork 



"Th« health of the people U the aaprcme law/*- ( icero. 



PROGRAM 



K ¥ * 



1 (a) MARCHING 
(b) FOLK DANCING 

* Norwegian Mountain Climbing Dance 
Claaii of 20 Yoong Women 

• The North folk lore to embody their dall) work In their 
recreation. 

In thie aliople folk dance the leader ef each group repre- 
aenta the guide In the climbing of tbe mooataio. 



2 BAR BELI.S 



Clnsa of 16 Young Men 



J (a) FREE GYMNASTICS. Swadijh Daj'a Order 
(hi FANCY STEPS. "Dainty Step" 

Claaa of 20 Woraea 



4 DUM3 BELLS 



5 81DEHOR3E 



Claaa of 16 Young Men. 
"Cym Team" 



5 MARCH 1914 



ANNUAL PUBLIC 
DEMONSTRATION 

OF THE 

Physical Training Department 

OF THE 

West Chester State Normal School, 
Saturday. March 7, 

7.30 O'CLOCK. 

Exercises include (Mass -Marchinc. 
Club Swinging. Dumb Bells, Bar Bells, 
Wands, Free Gymnastics, Folk and 
Fancy Dancing, Work on Parallel Bars 
and Horse. 

Reserved seats, 50c; General Admis- 
sion, 25c; Children, 15c. 

Chart at Ku part's. 



"Gyea Tcaea" 





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5 . 3 ' *■¥* 



March 1914 Girls Group 




March 1914 Gym Exhibition 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 99 





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100 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 



5 MARCH 1914 



ANNUAL PUBLIC, 
DEMONSTRATION 

OF THE 

Physical Training Department 

OF THE 

West Chester State Normal School, 
Saturday, March 7, 

7.30 O'CLOCK. 
Exercises., include Class Marching, 
Club Swinging; Dumb Bells, Bar Bells 
Wands,. Free Gymnastics, Folk and 
Fancy Dancing, Work on Parallel Bars 
and Horse. _ , . , 

Reserved seats, 50c; General Admis- 
sion, 25c; Children, 15c 
"Chart -at, Rupert's./ 

9 MARCH 1914 

The annual public demonstration of 
the Department ol Physical Training of 
the West Chester State Normal School, 
under direction of Dr. and Mrs. C. E. 
Ehinger, ably assisted by Miss Mar- 
garet Belden and Frank A. Long, at- 
tracted a large gathering of students 
and graduates of the school and resi- 
dents of this community, in the School 
gymnasium, on Saturday night; the run- 
ning track or gallery was crowded, while 
most of the chairs on the elevated tiers 
were occupied, in the assemblage being 
several prominent instructors of physical 
training from the nearby schools and 
towns. "5- ^ 

Conspicuous was the fine display of the 
bea-iiiful class banners of the school 
classes from 1900 to date, which were ar- 
tistically arranged over head among the 
huge rafters, by Mr. Long and some of 
tne Normal boys. A feature , too, of the 
meeting was the marked enthusiasm and 
school spirit that was manifested, from 
the ripening of the big show and long 
after the concluding number, the build- 
ine resounding with the hearty cheering 
and class yells of the students of both 
sexes. 

THE EXERCISES. 
The programme was opened promptly 
at half-past seven o'clock, with the ad- 
vent of sixteen young women attired in 
white shirt-waists, black bloomers, black 
sailor ties, who gave a series of 
marches, under direction of Mrs. C. E. 
Ehinger, and concluding with the Nor- 
wegian Mountain Climing Dance. The 
music for this exercise as well as others 
on the programme, was rendered on the 
piano forte by Miss Ruth J. Johnson, a 
re'-ent assistant in the Normal gym- 
na.-ium, now instructor of physical cul- 
ture in the West Chester public schools. 
The young women who participated In 
this event were Misses Dorothy Bar- 
ker, Julia H. Bitler, Margaret Burnham. 
Helen Cromwell, Anna Clieyney, Emolita 
Callaway, Helen Graver, Florence 
James, Clara James. Sara Kerwin, Kath- 
erine Hartman. Adelaide McCrone, Dora 
Passmore, Helen Smith, Ether Sauer- 
hKmmer, Louise Ware. 

BAR BELLS. 
An even dozen young men, uniformed 
in red jerseys and gray trousers, gave 
an exhibition of the varied uses of the 
bar bells, introducing some effective 
r-.ovements, their work evoking continual 
aoplause. This class included Frank 
Craig, Walter Dougherty. Floyd Fretz. 
G-orge Garrett, Wells Howland, Ernest 
McConnell, Leland Pyle, Graydon Perry, 
Clarence Stltger, Henry Sobral, Eugene 
Wright. Earl Woodley, George Yocum. 



FREE GYMNASTICS. 

Free Gymnastics, (Swedish Day's' or- 
der), were given In proficient manner by 
twenty-four girls of the Class of 1915, 
attired in white waists, black bloomers, 
blacy ties, and black shoes. They were 
repeatedly greeted with applause, and 
'concluded their work with a series of 
'fancy steps and elicited additional ap- 
plause and was much enjoyed by the as- 
semblage. The class was in charge of 
Miss Belden, who was presented with a 
large bouquet of pretty and fragrant 
pink carnations. 

Those in this class were Florence 
Hemmir, Anna Laub, Mabel Kistlcr,' 
Mary Howard, Enola Howett. Dorothy 
L^ssig, Margaret Henderson, Beatrice 
Bell, Mary Crossman, Mary Fogg, Mar- 
garet Stemple, Miriam Heckman, Iletdine. 
Meyer, Lillian Perry, Hazel Vanzant, 
Ernohta Callaway, Irene Randall, Sara 
Farley, Anna Ottinger, Ruth Palmer, 
Lillian Paynter, Anpa Walsh. ( 

DUMB BELLS.. 

This class of young men wore red jer- 
seys and gray trousers, and, under direc- 
tion of Dr. Ehinger, gave a number of 
new movements," that aroused storms of 
applause, when they turned somersaults, 
rolled over the floor, slid and did other 
unlooked for an unexpected capers. They 
were given a tumultuous encore and re- 
peated some of their" unique perform- 
ances to the evident delight of the spec- 
tators. These fellows were Norman 
A -delotte. Edward Barry, Lloyd Bu- 
chanan, "Dean Cummings. Harry Dunne-. 
gan, Brandt Earhart, Henry Faucett, 
Hemy Huntzinger, Ernest Krick, Chas. 
Meyers, Claud Miller, Charles Steele, 
Harry Schoenley, George Weideman. ; 
GYM. TEAM ON THE SIDE HORSE. 

Under the leadership of Mr. Long, the 
gvm. team, dressed in white sleveless 
jeiseys and grap trousers, gave a pleas- 
ing exhibition of aerial flip-flaps and 
similar stunts, on the side horse, ana 
won rounds of applause. This team in- 
cluded only a few of last year's team, 
and it devolved upon Mr. Long to de- 
velope almost an entirely new team, and 
they showed well their carefully training 
am' instruction. The team included 
Charles Meyers, Lloyd Neal, Raymond 
Michner. Irvin Shoffstall, Charles Hem- 
mis, Roland Garrison, George Focht, 
V/il^am Dennison, William Wilson, 
Paul Horst, LeRoy Brooke, Norman 
Snmers. 

MARCH OF THE SENIORS. 

Sixteen young men of the Senior Class 
gav a fine exhibition of marching, 
wheeling and varied manoeuvres, under 
Dr Ehinger. They wore white shirts 
aid collars, white trousers with black 
otripes, black neckties, belts and shoes. 
They made a splendid showing and this 
event was one of the spectacular fea- 
tures of the exhibition, the class por- 
tiayinc marked proficiency, and receiv- 
ing repeated applause. Later the young 
men were joined by twenty young wo- 
ment of the Senior Class, who marched 
into the gym., headed by Miss Anna. 
7ebley, of Newark, Del., who bore aloft 
pi'oul'ly the magnificent new banner of 
tin Class of 1914, of blue and brown silk, 
on which was hand-pair.led the seal of 
the Normal School. The girls wore white 
-vaists and skirts, with black ties. After 
-ti extended performance with the In- 
dian club, introducing several new and 
pretty movements and combinations, the 
entire group of girls and boys assembled 
in a circle about the class banner and 
sang heartily some verses to "The Gold 
and the Blue," concluding their song 
with their Class yell. The affair was re- 
sponded to with hearty applause from 
the students of the other classes. 

The vounc women who participated in 
the-?* pleasing exercises were Misses 
Alary Ghee, Ethel Bratton, Lillian Os- 
wald Mary E. DeHart, Ethel Frank, 
Marian Passmore, Anna Cope, Henrietta 
We-terhoff. Marian R. Johnson, Alva 
Stackhouse. Elizabeth Waltz, Louise 
Rcvuolds, Hildred D.ickerson. Evelyn 
Re .erts, Miriam Holt, Frances Bull, 
Helen Banks, Helen Whiting, Florence 
Rod'-ocki Emma Gulick. 



loung men— L.eRoy Brooke, Clarence 
■ arey. Herbert Diehl, Ralph Eberley, 
Charles Hemmig, John Kinneman, Irwin 
LoOPe, Abraham Mangle, Raymond Micn- 
r-er, Frank McLaughlin, Llayd Neal, 
Rov Paige, Ernest Schrope, McKinley 
Stevens. Josiah Tyson. 

Fc. lowing this demonstration, under 
th : leadership of the Official Cheer-Lead- 
er, Hubert Harkins, the entire student 
body joined in giving the victory yell— 
"V-i-c-t-o-ry," following with the School 
yell for Dr. Philips. % 

THE SHORT WANDS. 

A class of girls, in white waists, black 
bloomers, ties and black shoes, entertain- 
ed with a creditable exhibition of varied 
work with the short wands, and won re- 
peated applause. This class included 
Jul ; a Bitler, Ruth Brownwell, Dorothy 
Barker, Nancy Coleman, Jean Connor, 
Gertrude Cromwell, Anna Cheyney, Sara 
Etty, Sara Farley, Katherine Hartman, 
Clara James, Viola Morley, Adelaide Mc- 
Crone, Gladys Meyer, Adele Malcolm, 
Verna Nelson, Anna Ottinger, Ruth Pal- 
mer, Lillian Paynter, Elizabeth Plum- 
met, Dora Passmore, Irene Randall, Lil- 
lian Russell, Carrie Sigfos. Helen Smitn, 
Sara Kerwin, Louise Ware. 

THE POPPY DANCE. 

The big feature of the show was the 
"Poppy Dance," given by twelve young 
women of the Senior Class, under direc- 
tioi of Miss Belden. These performers 
were attired in long black gowns with 
s>ior f sleeves, and with bright red caps 
and collars; in each hand they carried 
simiiated poppies of bright red paper. 
The? 1 executed a number of graceful 
movements and dances, and w-ere accord- 
ed deserved applause for -their clever 
work. The class consisted of Misses 
Helen Kauffman, Marguerite Gery, Re- 
becra Greenberg,,: Jean VanDeventer. 
Mint Corwin, Ruth Kerr, Anna Knox, 
Caroline Hannum, Henrietta Westerhoff. 
Katherine Saylor, Blanche Gulick, Man- 

o "^ftrlcy. 

ON THE PARALLEL BARS. 

The gym, tea m, under Mr. Long, gav e 
a number of "thrillers," and circus 
stunts on the parallel bars that required 
some nerve to attempt and some skill 
and preparation to execute as cleverly 
as was done. This work of the young 
men and especially that of Mr. Long 
won them well-earned and deserved 
praise, i- 

Upon conclusion of the performance the 
Scb;ool^."sis, boom, rah," was given for 
turf gymnastic, followed by the Seniors' 
class yell for Dr.- and Mrs. Ehinger, Miss 
Belden and Mr. Long. . - - 

Besides the pretty flowers to Mrs. 
JUrhiger,! Miss Johnston received a bou- 
quet of flowers for her valued assist- 
ance, and Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger were 
presented with a pretty mantel clocK, 
and Mr. Long ._was_ the .recipient of a, 

handsome cameo scan pin. 

For some time after the entertain- 
ment, thu students remained in the gym- 
nasium and enjoyed a little social and 
indulged In their respective class yells. 
AMONG THE GUESTS. * *) 

Among the prominent guests were the 
following instructors of physical train- 
ing- 

Prof. Frederick Reith, physical train- 
ing department of the public schools of 
Philadelphia, and a recent assistant at 
tiie West Chester Normal School. 

Prof. Spencer M. Bennett, of the At- 
lantic City, N. J., public schools, for- 
merly physical director at Glen Mills 
School. 

Picf. Fred Brasch, of Temple College, 
Philadelphia. 

Miss Elsie Blanchard, Swarthmore Col- 
lege. 

Dr. Win. J. Shatz, School of Physical 
Education, Temple College, Philadelphia. 

A. J. Hlmmelsbiich, Physical Director 
of 1. M. C. A. West Chester. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 101 



5 APRIL 1915 



Annual Public Demonstration 

OF THE 

Department of Physical Training 

OF THE 

West Chester State Normal School, 
Friday Evening, April 9, 

at 7.30 O'CLOCK. 

Exercises In marching, dumb hells, har 
bells, fine gymnastics, wands and Indian 
clubs, -work on the parallel uars and horse, 
aesthetic dancing and postures. 

Reserved seats 50 cents 

General admission * 25 cents 

Children 15 cents 

Chart at Fath's (The Rnpert Store). 

apSnSt 

Annual Public 
Demonstration 



GYMNASTIC SHOW AT THE NORMAL 

Many groups of students, both boys 
and girls, of the West Chester State 
Normal School are now busy preparing 
under the direction of Dr. and Mrs. C. K 
Ehlnger. of the physical training depart 
ment, for the annual public demonstra 
tlon of the work of that department. Thi- 
exhibition will Include calisthenics, duml 
bells, Indian club and wand exercises 
fancy marches, some stunts by the gyD 
team, etc., and the show will occur ii 
the school gymnasium on Friday night o 
this week.— ' 



TKOGKAM 



TAUT 1 



1 Mabchiv; 



Clas= of 24 Young Wumei 



2 Bar Beli. E\er< i es 



CI:i=s of 24 Yuiuij: Men 



DEPARTMENT OF 

Physical Training 



3 (a) 1 Ri v GvMNASrn * 

Swedish Day's Order. Illustrating .. | art 
of the daily gymnastic U-- 

ib^ Dance— The Nightingale'' 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

West Chester, Pa. 

Friday Eve'g, April 9th, '15 

AT SEVEN-THIRTY O'CLOCK 



4 DlMU BELI. F.\ERrl-E3 



Clnss of 21- Young Men 



5 Exercise-, on Parallel Bar- 
PYRT II 



"Gym" renin 



I (a Aesthetic Dancing — "Columbine" 

ill) I'uSTI RI S 



12 Young Women of Senior Class 



Time of Departure of Trains and 
Trolleys 

Central Dis-ision leaves Market Street St: tion 9.30 and 
10.42 p. m. 

Main Lne leaves Market Street Station ' " p. m. 

Coatesville and Downingtown Trollev ave 9..">0 and 
1 1 .00 p. m. 

Philadelphia Trolley leaves High and Gsy Streets 10.13 
and 11.15 p. m. 

Kennett Square Trollev leaves High and Market Streets 
10.00 p. m. 



M \;<. n; v. 



.i Indian Cli n< 



4 Wand EXERCISES 



• \ 



Senior Y oung Men 



30 Young Men and Women of 
the Senior Class 



28 Y'oung Women of Junior Class 



"i Exercises <>n Side Horse 



"Gym" Team 



102 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 





o 
en 






U 

1/5 

rH 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 103 



10 APRIL 1915 



The annual public demonstration by the 
boys and girls of tbe department of phy- 
sical training at the West Chester State 
Normal School was given last evening, in 
the school's gymnasium, which was 
crowded with Btudents and friends. As 
usual, at the south end of the main floor 
were erected several scores of chairs in 
tiers on the raised platform, while the 
students occupied the running track 
above; those participating having reserved 
seats along the east and west sides of the 
main floor. The annual display of the 
silken banners of the several graduating 
classes was missing last ulght, and the 
only banner on Bhow vras that of the 
Senior class— 1915. M • \ \> 

The "big show" was opened with a ser- 
ies of intricate marches by a class of 
twenty-four girls, under the direction of 
Mrs. C. K. Ehinger. This class wore white 
waists, black skirts, stockings, shoes and 
lies. The girls were Misses Louisa Ari- 
son, Mary Bartges, Mida Blake, Beatrice 
Caley, Ruth Cook, Rutn Daniel, Margaret 
Iuennan, Lilian Ehinger, Sara Foreman. 
Kathleen Funk, Nettle Jacobs, Haebol 
Judd, Clara Kerwin. Elizabeth Landls, 
Grace Moyer, Anua Moulder, Edith 
Moore, Adelaide McCrone, Martha Rogers, 
Beulah Tabor, Ituth Updyke. Helen Wil- 
liams, Louisa Wilka, Jeannette Wright. 

A series of bar bell exercises were giv- 
en by twenty young men attired in gray 
trousers and garnet sweaters. These par- 
ticipants were Albert Ilelrick, Frank 'ful- 
ly, Millwood Grugan, Ezra Lay, Harry 
Dletz, Harry Dunnegan, Clettis Fara- 
baugh, Ernest Schultz, Patrick Lynch, 
Robert Yocnm, Charles Ostrtim, Lester 
Lukens, Henry Sobral, Clifton Atkins, 
Raymond KaufTman, Royd Moody, Gran- 
ville Menges, Earl Woodley, Arthur Miller 
and Luther Lady. 

Free gymnastics— A class of about a 
score of young woaieu, attired In black 
and white costumes, under the direction 
of Miss Gertrude chapmuu, tbe newly- 
appointed assistant in the gymnasium, il- 
lustrated a part of the dally gymnastic 
lesson at the Normal School, giving the 
Swedish Day's order. In concluding their 
Nightingale." This number was greatly- 
appreciated and the various movements 
of the girls evoked continuous applause. 
The class was compelled to respond to 
the encore. The girls were Emma An- 
drews, Beatrice Hell, Elizabeth Beaumont. 
Jean Connor, Aline Corwln, Beatrice 
Caley, Olga Etlieh, Alma Etlicb, Eliza- 
beth Gregg, Mary J. Hackman, Marian 
Keen, Clara Kerwin, Dorothy Lessig, Es- 
ther Loftus, Huth Meaker, Jean Mislon, 
Irene Randal), Marlanua Satterthwalt. 
Amy Walton, Mercedes Watklns, Mary 
West, Elva Veakle. 



i„ ,h e „ , L y ,, yo "" e mon who took part 
in the bar bell exercises, reappeared and 
gave dumb bell exercises and were ac- 
corded rounds of applause, some of their 
movements being real thrillers, as they 
turned and rolled about in rhythmic man- 
ner upon the floor. This was one of the 
features tho class being under command 
of J>r. Ehinger. 

Part first was closed with exercises on 
the parallel bars by nine young athletes 
n charge of Frank A. Long, the assistant 
In the gymnasium. The young men did 
a number of difficult feats and were greet- 
ed with repeated applause. Mr. Long dis- 
played his marked ability as an instructor 
and performer on the parallel bars 

RwfEf.i y A°," ns nj . eD were Captain ' irvln 

Miofstall, .Myers, Amniertuan, Perrv Reha 
Dougherty, Wilson, Nelso and Focht ami 
all covered themselves with glory by their 
fine work. 

Then Herbert Harklus, tbe official cheer 

leader of the school, appeared on the floor 

and led the entire student body in giving 

he victory yell. b 

After a slight intermission part second 
was opened with an exhibition of aestheic 
danclng, "Columbine," followed by a ser- 
ies of postures on an elevated platform 
placed In the centre of the floor ThU 
class included eleven young women of 
the Senior class, who were attired in 
white dresses of semi-diaphanous mater 
ial decorated with pink flowers. Th . 
dance and the several graceful postures 
proved one of the pleasing numbers The 
participants were Misses \nna rti.Her 
Rhea Drexel, Anna Howe] "%£ ! l"i 
Parry Florence Standring.' Marl-ret 
Stemple, Louise Ware, Florence Spedden 
Wi^ha^' ™* WlckMb.Sflgffi 

in charge of Dr Ehlmrei- ti ... e ' 

a numbeY of Intricate evlfuiion^^riltnl 

from columns of twos and four , o 

column? Trte" breakh,s fr0 ™ »"« o 

in wMt'e «hf f >OU ".f men Wfcrc attired 
in white shirts, white trousers wilh 

r'l^ 'vf 3 , and belts - Th « class deluded 
Lloyd Buckman. Francis Moyer, Homer 
Ammerman, Ernest McConnell, Arthur 
higman, Paul Bergy, George Focht 
Abram Klen, Raymond Webster, James 

rn» h riJ r M ln Sh ° fatal . William Wilson! 
Charles Myers, Grant Swartley. r> Lu- 
ther Haldeman, Herman Brubacker. Up- 

ot S Cl Sl°f.,"" s 1 rU1 ' the rresinerrt 
or the Senior Class, Norman Stephens 
appeared on the floor bearing aloft the 
big banner of the class, around which 
the young men gathered and gave their 
class yell a round of applause greeting 
them as they marched from the gymna- 



women n of C Vh b e% Th , irt> V, young me " ™* 
women of the Senior Class appeared in 

rZ?« , e h xecute<5 Performance with Indian 
Clubs, their work provoking repeated an- 
V^HS^. The young women were Misses 
Julia. Bitler, Esther BotterbuscR, Florence 
Buckner. Mary Cressman, Helen FenTald 
Mary Howard, Viola Morlev. Helen Rois 
Carrie Slgafoos, Blanch Schultz? Sara 
feimonspn Mane Street. The voung men 
were Arthur Sigman, William WilSon 
Irwin Shofstal, Charles Myers. Luthef 
Haldeman James Uish, Grant Swartley 
r c ™" Brubacker. Homer Ammerman 
Francis Mover, Lloyd Bachman. Ernest 
McConnell, Raymond Webster. 

PRIZE CUP AWARDED 
On behalf of the Athletic Association 
i the .., s ,ehool. Dr. Ehinger presented 
a beautiful gold-lined, sliver loving cup 
to the girls team of the Senior Class 
who had won the inter-class champion- 
ship in the basket hall tournament for 
the pxst season. Tho sup was given to 
Miss Sarah Slmonson, the captain of 
the team, and the Seniors responded 
with class yells by Luther Haldeman 
who invited all "to get In it " mtman ' 
«.yS^ nd J?, xerc 'ses-Tastily atired in white 
waists, hlack skirts, etc., twenty-eight 
young women of the Junior Class enter- 
tained with some pretty exercises with 
wands. This class included Misses Lou- 
isa Anson. Sara Broslus. Mamie Beswick 
Alice Cprwin, Genrude Clifton. Ruth 
Cook, Ruth Daniel. Margaret Drer.nan, 
Lillian Ehinger, Kathleen Fung, Helen 
Haupt, Lottie Jacobs, lluchel Judd. Clara 
Kerwin, Elizabeth Landls, Evelyn Mover 
Edith Moore, Marian Mlnsker, Anna 
Moulder, Martha Rogers. Beulah Talbot 
Ruth Updyke, Louise Miller, .icssle Wal- 
ton, Jeannette Wright, Helen Williams. 
Grace Weeks. 

The exhibition war, closed with a num- 
ber of exercises on the side, horse by the 
young men of the gym team, who had 
previously performed on the parallel bars 
They gave a number of .stunts, displav- 
mg their agility and feats of strength 
and won rounds of applause. It was 
nearly ten o'clock when the final act 
was given, and then the students surged 
upon the floor and made the building 
ring with their respective class yells.the 
big class of 1915 proclaiming in stentorian 
voice that "1916 can't be beat." 

During the entertainment, the accom- 
paniments upon the pinnn were render- 
ed by Miss Johnson, of tbe West Ches- 
ter High School, a former assistant in 
the Normal Gymnasium; Miss Margaret 
Griffith and Miss Emolita Calloway 
Many beautiful flowers were presented 
to Mrs. Ehinger, Miss Chapman, and 
Miss Johnson, while the Senior C'laae 
gave Mrs. Ehinger a mayonnaise-dress- 
ing of silver; the hoys of the Class of 
inifi presented to Mr. Long a pair of gold 
cuff buttons, inscribed: "F. A. L — Clnsq 
of 191(5." 




OU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO BE 
PRESENT AT THE ANNUAL PUBLIC 
DEMONSTRATION OF THE WORK OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
TRAINING AT THE WEST CHESTER 

state normal school, friday, 
April ninth. Nineteen Hundred 
fifteen, at seven-thirty O'clock 



Tms card presented at the door Will secure a reserved seat 
fV 3 v. P. 



104 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 
8 MARCH 1916 



8 MARCH 1916 



GYMNASTIC 
Demonstration 

Department of Physical Training, 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 
FRIDAY EVE'G, MARCH 10, 

At 7.30 o'Clock. 

Exercises in Marching, Free Gymnas- 
tics, Dumb Bells, Bar Bells, Wooden 
Rings and Indian Clubs. 

A^so, Folk Dancing, Aesthetic Danc- 
ing and Postures. 

Work on Parallel Bars and Side 
Horse. . . 

Admission, 25 cents; children, 15 cents. 
Reserved seats, 50 cents. . 

Chart at the Rupert Store. 

11 MARCH 1916 

In the gymnasium of the State Normal 
School last evening a large audience was 
entertained for a couple of hours by the 
excellent floor work done by the students 
in the gymnastic classes. In the company 
of spectators, which filled main floor and 
gallery, were many former students who 
returned to see how the exercises these 
days changed from those of the old times. 
Flowers were present in abundance, 
and the class yells and other features 
which, indicated that the buoyancy of 
youth is bound to express itself, added 
much to the pleasure of those attending. 
Ushers were. David Cramp, Thomas J. 
Lewis, Lester Nelson. Lester Bergey, 
Harold Pierce, Blvin Eveson, Ernest 
Crich, Lloyd Fretz and Wm. Aten 

Harojd Pierce acted as cheer leader, 
and the students gave cheers for Dr. 
George Morris Philips, and Miss Elvira 
Y. Speakman, preceptress, and closed 
with the victory yell, this while the aud- 
ience was waiting for the first march. 
Later there were yells for the physical 
directors. 

Miss Anna Williams, Miss Teresa Lay 
and Miss Nellie McLaughlin acted as ac- 
companists during a portion of the even- 
ing. 

Junior girls appears first, wearing 
white waists black sollor ties and black 
gymnasium skirts, back stockings and 
shoes. They received hearty applause. 
Grace Weeks, their leader, set them a. 
pace which was admired. Mrs. Ehlnger 
directed. 

Bt Ehlnger directed the yonng men 
of the Junior class, who appeared with 
bar bells, which they handled with many 
many graceful motions and !- perfect 
time. Applaose Was especially vigorous 
from the side where the fair classmates! 
sat watching in high approval, and at the: 
close, the audience Joined^ «. .*«>-. ,.-»...*-■--*. j 
"Following In ihelr. freeTgrniriasticV of 
the Swedish day's order,' directed by Miss 
G,ertrude Chapman, a group of girls 'gave' 
".The Little CarronseV'X singing a stanza 
in pleasin? fashion. - ..<.'■" .■ '■ .•.".•*..;'.>" 
- Dumb bells were ..used effectively by 32 
young men who- stood, gat and lay flat on 
the floor In unison, -winning much ad- 
miration and creating no small amount 
of-" amusement ' • •■• ■ v " 

-Frank A. Long, Dr. Ehlnger's assistant, 
led the gym team in parallel bar work, 
which was creditably done. At times the 
1 'i-"se audience was breathless with In- 
terest. * 

Senior young men In white outing 
suits with black belts and ties, made a 
inp appearance, keeping their lines per- 
f. rflv rigid and their time exact. 
Senior young men and women worked 
',!<• I.y side In their Indian club drills, 
i- combination being a pretty one. 
' Ills with wooden rings gave some at- 
tf-active motion work and a folk 
,l,i:,:e, their final postures winning ap- 
nlause. 



Floyd Fretz, President of the Senior 
class and the class Secretary, Lois.Faw- 
rett, presented Mrs Ehinger with a beau- 
tiful bouquet of Damask roses, just be- 
fore the Senior girls did their aesthetic 
dancing and assumed their pyramidal 
postures. When this closed there were 
kink roses for Miss Chapman. 

A piece of silverware for Mrs. Ehln- 
ger, an umbrella for Dr. Ehlnger and a 
leather carrying bag for Miss Chapman 
were presented by the Juniors, who Vice- 
President is Harry Donegan. 

Exercises on the aide horse by the 
gym team closed the regular programme 
and then came more yells and good- 
night. 
Those taking part were: 
Bar bells and dumb bells— Clifton At- 
kins. Lester Bergey, Hugh Bell, William 
Chapman, Chambers Dennison, Dinneua 
netwiler. Lester Eddinger, Howard 
F.vans, Evan Eyriek, George Fowler, Wm. 
Freer Walter Ferguson, Cletus Fara- 
baugb. Harry Gross. Clarence' Gockley. 
Norman Graul, Aubrey Hoxter, Harvey 
Hoffman, Samuel HandlofC. David Knight. 
Wm. Hnskins, Ernest KaufTman, Miles 
Keener Ezra Loy, Arthur Miller, Gran- 
ville Me'nees. Adolph Prince, Robert Rey- 
nolds. Edgar Stephens, John Shutaek. 
Robert Sckuitz, Charles Smith. William 
Sinclair, Frank Tully, Robert Yocum. 

Gvm team— Captain Lynch. Ostrum. 
Dennegan, Perry. Steigerwalt, Reber, 
Dougherty, Faucett, Faneara, Weidman. 
SENIORS. 
Clubs— Frank Craig, Ernest Craumer, 
Harry Dunnegan. Brandt Earhart, Harold 
High. Raymond KaufTman, LeRoy Kellor. 
Luther Ladv, Lester Lukens, Patrick 
L-rnch, Charles Ostrum. Graydon Perry. 
Ftarrv Schoenly, Lee Schrope, Wilmer 
Sbooii Thorlow 'Sliafer. Henry Sobral, 
Cbas. Spindler. Geo. Weidman, George 
Yocuiu. Wm. Stricklor. Merrill .Tones. 

Marc-bins— Craig. Craumer. Dunnegan, 
Enrlmrt High, Kanffman. Kellor, Lady, 
I ulceus. Lvnch, Ostrum, Perry. Schoenly, 
Schrope, Snoop. Shafer. Sobral. Spindler, 
Weidmau, Yocum, Strickler, Jones. 
GIRLS. 
Marching— Winifred Ash. Ethel Aungst. 
Ruth Butler, Margaret Burnham, Elsie 
Courow Elizabeth Caskey. Alfurata Dilks. 
Lilian Ehinger. Edith Gregg. Viola Hat- 
ton Mary Hershey. Rachel Hamilton, Ada 
Hardweg, Estella Hei' m: 'n, Emma Hu- 
flo'-'k Susie Johnson, Genevieve Lumis, 
Elizabeth Lewis. Belle Moore, Edith 
Moore ■Sara Rlioads, Anseline Rhoads, 
Marv -Warner, Grace Weeks. 

Free gvmuastics— Viola Baliette. Mar- 
garet' Bevau. Helen B-altbazer. Myra De 
Temple. Elsie Dougherty. . Mary Durkan, 
Fav Fluik. Hilda Guth. Ada Hardweg. 
Anna Knauer, Marie May. Alma Matz, 
Jean Parker, Elizabeth Peters. Bessie 
Swartz, Ellen Shay. Mary TO. Thompson, 
Marian Wilkinson, Esther Yeikes. 
; Senior clubs— Emma Andrews, .Mary 
Andrews. Sara Bnringer. Beatrice Be ., 
■Mamie Beswick. Florence Bush. Lillie 
Chambers. Margaret Crowley. Winifred 
Collins, Ruth Daniels, Katheryu Doyle. 
Dorothy Lessig. Eilith McMullen, Ethel 
McNalr. Elizabeth Russell." Marjorle Re- 
bert Mary Thomas. Amy Walton. Helen 
Williams, Bessie Wassuui. 

Senior "dance— Ellznbetb ' Beaumont. 
Meralda Breunan; Florence Barwlg. Alma 
Etlfeh, Olga Etlich. Margaret Hendersou. 
Enoln Howjtt. Mary Keen. Jeau Milson. 
If nth Portz. Irene Randall, Tillle Riley. 
Mary Roscerett. Grace Savage. Imelda 
Sullivan, Jane . Yardley. 

Wooden rings— Marie Claybaugh. Dor- 
othy Crnser. Hazel Evangan. Myra Eynon, 
Lilian Ehinger. Evelyn Fenstermacher. 
Dorothy Geidner, Helen Hoopes. Elva 
Hazel. Emily Harba'li. Ada Hardwes. 
Beatrice Kane, Alverna Kanffman. Clara 
K'erwln Irene Latsbaw. Helen McGregor. 
Wooden rings — Marie Claybaugh. "Dor- 
othy Cruser, Hazel Evangan. Myra Eynon, 
Lilian Ehinger, Evelyn Fenstermacher. 
Dorothv Geidner, Helen Hoopes. Elva 
Hazel. 'Emily Harbach. Ada Hardweg. 
Beatrice Kane, Alverna Kanffman, Clar:i 
Kerwin Irene Latsbaw. Helen McGregor. 
Evelvn 'McMichael. Helen Naueely, Ruth 
Phillips, - Sara- Place- -Xydla... Probst, Mil- 
dred Roland Rose Siegler,' Gface Shoop. 
Miriam Stirl. Iv a Vought, Helen jWolliver. 
Margaret MUU» ' 



OYMNASTIC DEMONSTRATION. 

in His divine wisdom, has seen fit to re- 
in the annual demonstration of the Phy- 
sical training department of the State 
Normal School this week, as announced 
elsewhere. The prospective teachers are 
finely prepared and their work If ',.' 
mirablv done. Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Ehin- 
ger through long experience in heir 
work; have learned Just how to arrange 
their programmes so as to keep the in- 
terest keen. Many -parents fna Wends 
are coming long distances to attend and 
a number of educational people from 
neighboring towns' "end cities will be 
m-esent to observe.— Adv. 



5 APRIL 1916 



The Current Events Class of 
the West Chester New Century 
Club was treated to an exhibit 
tion of "Fancy dancing" by a 
number of young girls from the 
State Normal School, under the 
direction of Gertrude Chap- 
man, assistant instructor in 
physical culture, who herself 
participated in the first dance, 
assisted by Miss Lillian Ehinger 
and Miss Florence Barwig. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 105 






1916 Gymnastics Show 



106 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




Frank Long With the 1916 Men's Gym Team 




Women Folk Dancing 




1916 Normal Orchestra 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 107 



8 MARCH 1916 



GYMNASTIC 
Demonstration • 

Department of Physical Training, 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 
FRIDAY EVE'G, MARCH 10, 

At 7.30 o'Clock. 

Exercises in Marching-, Free Gymnas- 
tics. Dumb Bells, Bar Bells, Wooden 
Rings and Indian Clubs. 

A^so. Folk Dancing, Aesthetic Danc- 
ing and Postures. 

Work on Parallel Bars and Side 
Horse. 

Admission, 25 cents; children, 15 cents. 
Reserved seats, 50 cents. 

Chart at the Rupert Store. 




Mrs. Ehinger 




Mr. Ehinger 



"AMULET" APRIL 1916 

mrli: girls of all classes deserve much credit fur the splendid work 
they did ai our annual gymnastic demonstration on Friday even- 
ing. March loth. 

I lie Junior girls, wearing their gymnastic costumes with white 
waists and Mack ties, were the first on the -program. Their marching 
and U milling Maze, under the direction of Mrs. Ehinger. were of ex- 
cellent form and perfect rhvthm. and considerable credii is due Miss 
(.race Weeks, win- led her classmates in h>th the marching and the 
Running Maze. The Swedish day's order, directed by Mis- Chapman, 
showed that the girl, accomplish much in their efforts to improve poise 
and gain strength: and its place on the program illustrated a part of the 
daily lessons of all classes. 

The two folk danges, the Cychl>ogar and Carrousel, proved to all that 
joy and happiness can he and is found in the gym. classes. Their move- 
ments were graceful and full of spirit. The second of the dances, the 
) "ling women sang as they danced. 

I he next number was a series of exercises with small wooden, 
rings. The exercises were accurately performed and the movements 
were so arranged that the effects were both pleasing and artistic. The 
numl>ers closed with three posture groupings. 

The Senior girls in their white dresses won much approval. The 
work in club-swinging was well done and their form of work showed the 

careful training of both Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger. This was the only num- 
ber wheie the young men and young women gave their work together. 

In the .Tsthetic dancing the Senior girh. wearing their simple gym- 
nastic costumes, gave a beautiful a-sthelic dance in an excellent manner. 
Their graceful abandon was very charming — testifying to the careful 
training of the instructor. Miss Chapman. Following the dancing, the 
young women assembled on a raised, double platform and, to musical ac- 
companiment, assumed harmonious positions representing statuary. 
There were six of these statue-groups. 

A movement has been started whereby the exhibition will be free to 
students, providing other arrangements to cover the expense tan be 
made. As usual a large number of invitations have been sent to the 
physical directors in this vicinity. The department is trying to make this 
an occasion for aTeunion of the alumni. 

Plans for the demonstration are progressing rapidly, and the various 
classes are taking more interest than usual in their drilling, which insures 
an exhibition of high order. Some new and very attractive features that 
have not been displayed before will be shown. The Senior club swinging 
will be something unusual in this line, while the gyir team will l>e 
larger than previously, and will give a fine exhibition of apparatus work. 
The boys of the school were- very much interested in taking active 
part in the annual Gymnasium Exhibition, held on Friday evening. Man h 
ioth. and as a result the exhibition turned out to be a great success. 

The second number on the program was the exercises with bar-bells, 
conducted by thirty-two of the boys of the second year and third year 
classes. Several of the exercises were very complicated, but each bov 
carried out his part well, and at the finish the audience showed its appre- 
ciation by its hearty applause. 

The boys of the Senior class, dressed in white suits, gave an ex- 
cellent demonstration of marching, which showed the training one gets 
on the military line at this school. After this the same boys took part 
with the girls of the Senior class in the exercises with Indian clubs, which 
were very cleverly rendered. 

The "gym team" concluded the program by interesting the audience 
with their various exercises on the side horse. The whole demonstration 
was well carried out and very pleasing to each of the spectators present, 
due chiefly to the hard work of Mrs. and Mr. Ehinger. the physical in- 
structors. 



108 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 





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DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 109 




14 NOVEMBER 1917 



MICHAEL DORIZAS 

The Greek Traveller and Lecturer 



LTXmiZAS' FEAT OF STRENGTH 
He CatcEes a 'Falling Private 'ana Pre- 

vents Serious Bruises anfl Breaks. 

Big- "Mike" Dorizas isn't given td 
ringing- the changes on his feats of 
strength — in fact, those that know him 
best say it is the last subject he will- 
ingly discusses. But in a midnight 
talk w ith a friend after his lecture 
here Thursday night, the following in- 
cident was drawn from him: 

Base Hospital No. 20, University of 
Pennsylvania, has a hundred dollars' 
worth of supplies stored In a certain 
building. The big Greek now has the 
non-com. stripes. He had them when 
lecturing here last week, but modest- 
ly wore them in his pocket instead of 
on his sleeve. Among the duties of 
Corporal Dorizas is the taking of a 
new inventory of equipment. 

A slender private, incidentally the 
father of a family, had been cautioned 
as to the danger of moving carelessly 
aloft among the packing boxes filled 
with dozens of pairs of heavy hospital 
sheets. He made a misstep, fell from 
a height of some fourteen feet, an 
enormous case, hurling after him. 
Dorizas fortunately was on the floor. 
He sprang forward, caught the great 
weight on his broad chest and open 
palms, and the life of the sprawling 
private was saved. The big man clos- 
ed tile simple narration with. "I was 
given four times my usual strength, 
or I could not have done it." Dorizas 
lifts a ton with ease. 



When Dorizas arrived at Pennsylvania he was comparatively unknown. Gradu- 
ating- from Rohert College, Constantinople, with an A. B. degree, his only object in 
coming to America was for advanced study. But at the annual strength-testing 
examination in the Perm gymnasium for first-year men. Mike smashed all records by 
piling up 1776 points against the previous mark of 1460. In 1914 he increased this 
total to the startling record of 1890 points; in 1916, 2200, a figure never before 
dreamed of by strong men of college ranks. Considering his accomplishments in the 
fields of travel, oratory, writing, athletics, and. by all means, Christianity, he is truly 
a man of remarkable parts. 




Dr. Ehinger, Daughter Lillian, Mrs. Ehinger 



110 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




Aesthetic Dance 




Colonial Dance 

Colonial dancers in costume perform on the steps of college library for 
Washington's Birthday Celebration. 



The Annual Reception on George Washington's Birthday was given by the Class 
of 1919 in the Library of the Normal School. Many of the girls dressed in colonial 
customs, with their powdered hair and many of frills and laces, looked very attractive. 
They acted as guides and took the guests of the class through the receiving line. Our 
class officers, representing Mr. and Mrs. George Washington and Mr. and Mrs. 
John Adams, assisted by Prof, and Mrs. Dick and Miss Baldwin composed the re- 
ceiving line. 



DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 111 



Spring 1919 



Dr. Clyde Ehinger had completed thirty years 
association as director of physical training at age 62. He 
could look back to his early years when he introduced a 
number of sports into an otherwise heavily structured 
gymnastic program. 

The advent of World War I with the military and 
naval services being exposed to many sports meant that 
future college populations would be sports concious. The 
addition of Arthur C. Maroney and Herbert L. Mathers 
would provide an increasing emphasis on sports education 
with concomitant competition. Dr Ehinger provided major 
support for this movement. 

He also had continued his interest in reading the 
latest publications in his own field as well as that of art, 
sculpture and architecture. In this academic year he would 
continue his Saturday morning plan to go to Philadelphia 
by train and visit Leary's Book Store. 

It would seem that the fates of life would make a 
drastic change in his future. One Saturday morning he was 
totally absorbed in selecting books when he observed that 
he would possibly be late for the train to West Chester. 
Hastly he left the store and sped for the train station. As he 
approached the loading platform he noted the train under 
way. Clutching his books he ran after the train. As he came 
close to grasping the step rail he fell sustaining a shock and 
became unconcious. After medical care was hastily 
summoned he was taken to the hospital. Shortly his 
physician advised him concerning the nature and extent of 
his health in relation to his duties at the Normal 
Gymnasium. 

Dr. Philips, president and the teaching staff looked 
with dismay at the coming retirement of the senior faculty 
member. Dr. Charles Lewis, his assistant twenty years ago, 
was employed to relieve Dr. Clyde Ehinger. 

In retrospect his retirement was well deserved. Along 
with his talented wife Ella for thirty years they furnished 
the direction and leadership to make the West Chester State 
Normal School one of the leading physical education 
training centers in the United States. 

The greatest measure of their joint value in the 
profession was the continuing placement of their students 
and teaching assistants in all levels of education — 
universities, colleges, school districts, private and public 
gymnasiums. 

The dedication of the Ehinger Gymnasium in 1930 
will be part of the universal admiration for them both. 




DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




MRS. ELLA EHINGER 




GYMNASIUM 1880 



112 DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 




iMP**\ 






George Morris Philips looked forward to the annual alumni 
dinner in Philadelphia. On Friday, March 5, for the first time 
Seniors were permitted to attend this event. It was a happy 
evening for the Principal surrounded by many alumni and his 
Seniors. When this group was ready to leave, it had started to 
snow heavily. Reaching 69th Street, they boarded the West 
Chester trolley. The travelling was difficult for the two cars, 
drifts piling up in the track beds. Upon reaching Llanerch they 
were forced to return. On this return trip Dr. Philips became 
ill. Chris Sanderson, assisted by the trolley men and students, 
attended to him. Finally an ambulance took him from 69th 
Street to the University Hospital. His illness was diagnosed as a 




stroke. On Thursday morning, March 1 1th an era closed with 
the death of Pennsylvania's best known educator. The Normal 
community and friends from far and wide were stunned. It did 
not seem possible that he was gone. Condolences and 
expressions of sympathy flowed into West Chester. Dr. Philips 
had died in the service of the college among those he loved 
best — his students and the Alumni. 

A special memorial issue of the Amulet, the last one, was 
printed in his memory. An old era closed, a new one would 
begin. 




DR. CLYDE E. EHINGER 113 




ANDREW THOMAS SMITH 



First Alumnus President 



1920- 1927 



M.A., Ph.D. 



Andrew T. Smith was born in Worcester, Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1862. He graduated as 
President of his class from the West Chester Normal School in 
1883 while serving as a district teacher. For the next two years 
he taught at the Chester County Soldiers' Orphan School in 
Chester Springs. He returned to West Chester Normal, serving 
as Professor of Pedagogy from 1885 to 1899, during which 
appointment he served as Vice Principal for the last seven 



years. He married Elizabeth Fenton Ogden of Cape May, New 
Jersey on August 7, 1888. In 1892 he was granted a leave of 
absence to complete his graduate studies at the University of 
the City of New York. He graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Pedagogy in 1893. He accepted the position as Principal of 
Mansfield State Normal School, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 
remaining there until 1914. In January of that year he 
accepted an appointment as Principal at Clarion State Normal, 
also in Pennsylvania. In September, 1914, he moved to 
Detroit, Michigan to serve as Principal of the Thomas Normal 
School. In 1917 he returned to West Chester as Professor of 
Pedagogy. Upon the death of Dr. G. M. Philips, he was 
appointed Principal to relieve Professor Foster Starkey who 
had been serving in an acting capacity. 

During his Principalship the West Chester State Normal was 
changed into a State Teachers College; thus Dr. Smith was 
therefore technically the first President, as well as the first 
Alumnus to serve in this capacity. 

Dr. Smith was very active professionally as a lecturer at 
teachers' institutes, as a member and officer in the 
Presbyterian church and as a member of the Masonic order. He 
was the author of a number of educational articles and several 
books including "Mind Evaluations for Teaching Purposes" 
(1893), "Quarto-Centennial History of West Chester State 
Normal School" (1896), and "Systematic Methodology." His 
death occurred February 8, 1928. 




DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 115 



IV. Dr. Charles B. Lewis 



Director of Physical Education 1921-1926 

Charles B. Lewis by reason of his early training as a turner in the Philadelphia German Turn 
Gemeinde was employed as an assistant to Dr. Clyde Ehinger from 1900-1903. He then served as 
Physical Director at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania for two years. 

He accepted an appointment as Head of the Physical Training Department of Tufts College in 
Massachusetts. During this time he enrolled as a student in the Medical Department from which he 
subsequently received his Medical Degree. 

He received the next assignments as Physical Director at Worcester Academy and Worcester High 
School in Massachusetts. He also served as a member of the faculty at the Harvard Summer School of 
Gymnastics. 

Dr. Charles B. Leiws's Staff Assistants 1920-1927 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 




Dr. Charles B. Lewis 



1920-1927 



All Programs W,M,M/W 




Herbert L. Mathers 



1920-1923 



11 March 1921 W 

18 March 1922 W 

16 March 1923 M/W 




Naomi D. Ernst 

Alumna 1917 

(Mrs. Norman George) 



1920-1925 



11 March 1921 W 
18 March 1922 W 

16 March 1923 M/W 
21 March 1924 W 
27 March 1925 W 

12 March 1926 W 



Alice C. Schriver 




1922-1929 4 April 1922 (Model Sch. Show) 

16 March 1923 M/W 

21 March 1924 W 

27 March 1925 W 

12 March 1926 W 

29 March 1928 M/W 

15 March 1929 M/W 




Mira Wallace 



1923-1924 



16 March 1923 M/W 
21 March 1924 W 



116 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 




Luella M. Erion (R.N.) 



1923-1924 



16 March 1923 M/VV 
21 March 1924 W 




James F. McGovern 



1925-1928 



12 March 1926 W 
17 March 1927 M/W 




Charlotte M. Walls 



1925 



27 March 1925 W 




A. Irene Horner 



1925-1927 



27 March 1925 W 

12 March 1926 W 

17/18 March 1927 M/W 




Kathryn H. Musser (R.N.) 



1925 




Mary N. Glance (R.N.) 



1925 



27 March 1925 W 
12 March 1926 W 




Eva L. Dissinger (R.N.) 



1926 



12 March 1926 W 
17 March 1927 M/W 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 117 




NAME 
Lula V. Walker 



SERVICE 
DATES 

1926 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 

12 March 1926 W 




Gertrude Herzog 



1926-1927 



12 March 1926 W 
17/18 March 1927 M/W 




Mildred Hollobaugh 



1926-1927 



12 March 1926 W 
17 March 1927 M/W 




*^. 



iifKiKUEW^ 



By William Buffington 



118 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



12 MARCH 1921 



BIG SHOW lit 
NORMAL SCHOOL GYM. 

Pretty Girls of Physical Training De- 
^ partment Entertain Lasr/jyighf. 
Spjclidld Marching nnd Thrilling Ath- 
letic Stunts Delighted, I.nrge As- 

ftemblace of Spectator*. 
For a number of years prior to the 
great world war, the young women of 
the physical training department of 
the West Chester State Normal 
School, under direction of Dr. and 
Mrs. C. E. Ehinger. gave annual ath- 
letic exhibitions, in the Normal-School 
gymnasium, but during the years of 
the war these delightful events were 
discontinued, but last night were re- 
sumed, under management of, Miss 
Mabel Barton and Miss Naomi 
Ernest, the assistants In the gymna- 
sium. 

This gym. exhibition, as it is more 
commonly termed and known, at- 
tracted a large crowd of spectators, 
who greatly enjoyed the most credit- 
able showing by the several classes. 

Music was furnish' d by an orches- 
tra of several pieces, and aided in en- 
livening the occasion, while the sev- 
eral hundred students indulged in 
their respective cla"ss yells to their 
heart's desire. 

PRETTY GIRLS GALORE. 
Several hundred ' of the school's 
prettiest and athletic girls participat- 
ed in the ten events on the pro- 
gramme, and were attractively attir- 
ed in white blouses, black bloomer 
skirts, black stockings, white shoes 
and ties, the Seniors gearing black 
ties and the Juniors, red. 

To a lively march by the orchestra, 
sixty Senior giris marched Into the 
centre of the gymnasium and ga\e a 
numbei <• free arm exercises that 
won f r t>"?m rounds of hearty ap- 
plause, aftt, which forty-eight Sen- 
iors gave a dance 'arsovlennc. follow- 
ed by an enchanting ribbon dance by 
sixty-four Junior girls who entered 
the gym. skipping gaily and gliding in 
and out In a number of varied gyra- 
tions, and then whirling in groups, 
evoking storms of vociferous ap- 
plause. 



CLASSES IN COMPETITION. 

Thfji twenty Senior girls and twen- 
ty. ' i nior girls with their distinguish- 
ing ties of black and red. formed line 
on the west side of the floor, and were 
put through a lively and intricate 
drill in various manoeuvres by Miss 
Barton, in which they performed 
stunts that outrivaled the famous 
West Point cadets. 

Every movement elicited applause. 
The judges were Mrs. C. E. Ehinger, 
Miss Ruth Knott and Major W. But- 
ler Windlc, who awarded first honors 
to the Juniors, in wildest demonstra- 
tion of joy by the Class of 1922. 
BARXUM'S CIRCUS EXCELLED. 
Some of the biggest shows on earth 
often advertise a three-ring perform- 
ance, but the Normal girls outdid the 
great Barnum, for they put on a four- 
ring event, atid pulled off tilings in a 
wonderful way. that displayed excel- 
lent training, wonderful nerve, and re- 
markable agility. There were some 
thrill-- 1 <. as the girls clambered up 
the scries of ladders, and did all sorts 
of trii ks, then tied themselves in 
knots on tho parallel bars, vaulted the 
horse in varied movements, and then 
vaulted from the spring-board. Most 
of the girls cleared the bar in the 
spring-board contest at a height of 
rive feet four inches, but Miss Ernest 
and Miss Sleckbeck cleared the bar 
six feet, amid thunderous cheering 
Professor Herbert L. Mathers, of the 
physical training department, proved 
the "buffer" in the aerial flights, and 
had a narrow escape from getting into 
a bad mixup and spill. 

JUNIOR DANCE. 

Two dances, prettily executed, were 
given by twenty-four Junior girls, in 
quaint costumes and low shoes — (a) 
baby hornpipe; (b) Dutch dance. 
VOLLEY BALL. 

In the volley ball contest, the Se- 
nior team of ten girls got an early 
lead over the ten Junior girls, but the 
latter won the game by the score of 
11 to 10. And then there were more 
triun.phant cheers for the Juniors. 
WAND EXERCISE. 

Eighty-four Juniors entertained 
with a number of intricate movements 
with wands, to music by the. orches- 
tra, after which threo classes of girls 
gave a series of varied demonstra- 
tions, under the direction of a Irio of 



selected students— Misses ±lenrietta 
Shane. Evelyn Worth. Ruth Sharpe. 
The class work in an assortment of 
calisthenics was followed bv an 
amusing ODStacie race max evoKcu 
considerable, merriment. 

CHARMING DANCES. 
With a whoop of an Indian band. 
sixty-four Seniors pranced into the 
gym. and took positions in two large 
circles, squatting upon the floor, with 
arms folded and bodies swaying to 
the rhythm of their croning songs; 
then they jumped to their feet, utter- 
ing blood-curdling war-whoops as 
they danced lively around in the cir- 
cle, concluding this .stunt in some pos- 
ings. contributing thus to the two 
numbers— Indian dance and Cshebo- 
gah. They made their exit in another 
storm of applause. 

MORE PRETTY DANCING. 

Thirty-six Juniors contributed sev- 
eral dances to familiar airs, in which 
the girls displayed considerable alac- 
rity and gracefulness. 

The concluding event was a series 
of aesthetic dances: (a) Greek ball 
dance, by a class of special students, 
attired in gowns of pink, yellow. 
Blue and purple materials, hair rib- 
bons and bared arms, wearing black 
slippers. After the dance they group- 
ed in a number of artistic poses, while 
Misses Barton and Ernest won ap- 
plause in their dances, and each was 
the recipient of bouquets of pretty 
tlowers. 

An impromptu social and reception 
followed the gym. exhibition, and con- 
gratulations were showered upon 
Misses Barton and Ernest and I he 
other girls who participated so suc- 
cessfully. 




Aesthetic Dancers 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 119 



A linrtiniititl? (&£m Exhibition 

"Say, were you at the Gym last night?" 

"I'll say I was and I wouldn't have missed it for anything. "Wasn't it 
great ? ' ' 

That's what we heard all day Saturday March 12, because the night be- 
fore the gym sustained an unusual shock — the girls gave an exhibition of their 
athletic ability ! 

Under the skillful and competent guidance of Miss Barton and Miss Ernest 
the girls toiled untiringly for three long weeks in order to prove themselves 
capable of physical attainments. Did they succeed? Well, I guess! 

Promptly at 7:30, to our familiar society march, the first class of Seniors 
took their places upon the floor in soldierly array and performed intricate Free 
Arm Drill in perfect unison and harmony. 

Then the march resumed its sway and as the first class marched off the 
floor another class of Seniors entered and danced the Varsouvienne, which was 
followed by the Ribbon Dance by a class of Juniors. Their intricate windings, 
while holding aloof their class ties of brilliant scarlet, evidently pleased and 
astonished the audience, if we may judge by the ready applause. 

This was followed by the Competitive Marching — Seniors vs. Juniors. Up, 
down, around and across the floor they went whirling rapidly to the tune of — 
'"bout face! 'bout, face! backward, march! forward, march! 'bout face! 'bout, 
halt! - ' Altho the Seniors were forced to doff their caps to the Juniors the ready 
camradship remained unaltered. 

Two Senior classes then danced the wild and wooly Indian dance and the 
Bolshevist Chebogab, proving that we aren't so far removed from the Primi- 
tive stage as is usually believed. 

This was followed by apparatus work and springboard high jump. The 
feature of this, however, was the high diving which finished at the six foot 
mark with Miss Ernest and Lucy Steckbeck '22 triumphant. 

Two dances — the Hornpipe and the Dutch dance by Juniors closed the 
first half of the program. 

An inter-class volley ball game in which the Juniors were again victors 
with score 10-11 took place during the intermission. 

The next half opened with a wand drill bv Juniors to the strains of 
"Mighty Lak' a Rose." 

Another class of Juniors then danced gleefully to "Oh, Frenchy!" and 
"Sweet Little Buttercup." 

The closing feature was the Aesthetic Dancing. The first number was the 
Grecian Ball Dance by the members of Miss Barton's special class who were 
arrayed in flowing grecian robes of soft colors, which were touched off by the 
gilt balls with which they toyed so gracefully. 

When the Ball Dance was finished the dancers formed a graceful tableau, 
as Miss Barton and Miss Ernest danced the Bagatette. The tableau formed a 
picturesque background for Miss Barton and Miss Ernest, who were then pre- 
sented with roses by the girls of W. C. N., and the Gym Exhibition was over! 




12 March 1921 Show 



120 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



OSirls' OSiim iExhibilinn 



•■Oiil you see that CJym exhibition last nitc?" "Yes! Wasn't it great 5 ' 

Such were the comments made by everybody on March 1 Sell. Why? Because tlie demon- 
stration ni\en in the Gvm the night before showed the results of weeks of untiring effort on 
the part of the girl* and never-ending patience on the part of our skillful in-tructors, Miss 
Barton. Miss Ernest and Mr. Mathers. 

Prnmptlv at 7 :+5 a large class of Juniors marched on the flior in couples. They kept 
splendid rythm to the music as they marched into the various figures. The most impressive 
sb'hl «a- when thev marched up the Gym floor thirty-two abreast, all in perfect formation. 

As the figure marchers left the floor, a ver\ interesting group of Seniors, danced a very 
striking Russian Folk dance, "Pleytonka." Then another snappy dance, "Oxdanscn" was danced 
hv another class of Seniors. 

The rvthm drill given by a class of Seniors was especially noteworthy. This drill repre- 
sented different athletic activities, such as swimming, diving, bowling, basketball throwing, guard- 
ing and baseball pitching, catching and batting. 

The exercises on the different apparatus was very well demonstrated by both Seniors and 
Juniors. 

A class of Juniors danced the "Swedish Schottishe." after which a class of Seniors took their 
place on the floor and demonstrated some very difficult exercises in the lying and sitting positions. 

During the intermission, a volley ball game was played between the Senior and Junior 
clas-es. Both teams fought hard, hut one team had to win and luck fell to the Juniors. They 
won bv a score of 14-10. 

Another contest which was watched with much interest was the matching tactics. The com- 
petitors being twentv-fuur Seniors and iwentv-four Juniors. In quick response to the clear and 
rapid commands from Miss Barton, the girls right-about-faced, quarter-wheeled and counter- 
marched. The audience could see little difference in the excellence of the two groups, but the 
judges awarded the Seniors first place. 

A number which met with the heartiest applause nn behalf of the audience was the after- 
school activities. After the formation of the "Chinese Chain," the girls lined up for tumbling. 
This was followed lv the formation of pyramids. Miss Barton then thanked Mr. Mathers, in 
behalf of the girls, for his interest and beneficial instruction. Miss Ernest, our ven efficient 
basketball coach, awarded the letters and numeral- to the Senior and Junior Basketball teams 
High diving from a spring board was the la-; activity. Mis* Gladys Nickle and Miss Lucy 
Steckbcck cleared the bar at si-; teet and three incite-. 

I he Highland Fling was danced bj a class of Seniors, followed bv "Tarentella," danced 
by a cla-s of Juniors in pretty costumes. 

I he closing feature u.t a billet. "The Conquest of Winter." This was a fitting climax 
to such a splendid athletic performance. 




AESTHETIC DANCERS 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 121 




PYRAMID 



5 APRIL 1922 



jjd& 



EL SCHOOL GIVES 

GYMNASTIC EVENT 



Children Show Parents and Seniors What 

They Can Do on Big; Floor 

When Well Prepared. 

One of the happiest events of the 
season at' the West Chester State Nor- 
mal School took place yesterday after- 
noon when the pupils of the Model 
School gave a demcnstratlon In the 
gymnasium. Dr. Charles B. Lewis, di- 
rector of health studies In the Normal 
School, was in charge, and because he 
is fond of the young people and they 
like him, they took Intense Interest in 
their work, being delighted to show 
their parents had it should be done. 

There were in all over 280 children 
who took part, being guided to the 
gymnasium by their teachers, Miss 
Lilian W. Pierce, Principal and first 
grade; Miss Anna P. James, sixth 
grade; Miss Nora Spangler, fifth 
grade; Mrs. Grace J. Fountain, fourth;' 
Miss Edna Lowe, third; Miss Susan 
Ratledge, second;* Miss Dora E. Wol- 
fangle, first. 

Children' sat on the floor, grouped 
about their teachers, and the visitors 
occupied two rows of chairs which ex- 
tended completely around the walls. 
The gallery was filled with Normal 
School students. 

In the first three grades the work 
was in eurythmics, including many 
pretty -movements. In the fourth, 
fifth and sixth grades there were the 
regular gymnastics.- Pupils of the 
sixth grade used wands prettily. Dur- 
ing th e l as t ten minutes the three 
higher grades had games of different 
sorts directed by six Seniors who had 
them In charge, specialists in this 
work. 




THE PROGRAMME. 

Every number on the programme 
elicited rounds of well-deserved ap- 
plause. The demonstrations included 
the following: 

First Grade: Imitation plays — 
Giants, See-saw, Blowing Bubbles. 
Story Play: Making garden and cut- 
thing the grass, etc. Rhythmic 
play: "Did you ever see a lassie," and 
"How do you do, my partner.' 1 Tho 
children danced to music furnished 
by a phonograph. 

Second Grade: Imitation plays — 
See-saw, frogs' school, soldier boy. 
Story play: The circus, introducing 
dancing bears, feeding the elephants^ 
roaring lions, jugglers, jumping 
horses, and the band. Rhythmic 
play, "The Shoemaker." 

Third Grade — Forms of work, with 
five fundamental gymnastic positions, 
"and Danish dance. 

"Fourth Grade — Group exercises in 
calisthenics. Rhythmic- plays, "Oats, 
Peas, Beans and Barley." 

Fifth Grade — Calisthenics, with 
arm. leg and trunk exercises. - 

Sixth Grade — Varied movements 
with the wands. 

Games — Fourth grade, bowling pin. 
races; fifth grade, side-pass ball; 
sixth grade girls, overhead pass ball; 
sixth grade boys, straddle ball. The 
leaders were Misses Florence Carey, 
Miss Alice Schriver, Miss Lucy Steck- 
bek and Charles Lyons, Roy Maurer 
and Charles Brooks. 




SENIORS ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 
(Charles S. Swope, far right) 



122 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



UJlir §orial Hour 

Last spring when we left the Normal school for our summer vacation, 
everyone wondered what our social privileges would be this year. Many 
rumors filled the air. but no one knew definitely what changes would be made 
under the new Administration. Everybody? however, longed for the privilege 
to dance, (boys and girls together). 

In the fall while it was still so delightful on the campus, we cared little 
about being in doors, hut when the evenings grew cold and dark early and we 
could no longer enjoy being on the campus, we all were waiting patiently to see 
if an announcement would be made to the effect that we should be permitted to 
use the gymnasium after supper. In due time that announcement came. "The 
girls are invited to the gymnasium Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 
evenings to enjoy a social hour from after supper until Seven o'clock." When 
we assembled there we were given the opportunity to dance. 

Each evening some members of the faculty were at the gym to properly 
chaperone the dance. 

So far the boys were ignored this privilege, but' on the following Friday 
evening, Dr. Smith invited the young men to join the' young ladies. Alas, 
with this addition the social hour indeed became very complete. 

. A large sign was hung in the gymnasium containing these words: "Straight 
Dancing Only Allowed on this floor." With this constant reminder, every 
student was particular to carry out the wishes of our principal and faculty. 

Besides the regular dances, during the winter months which occasionally 
alsted until nine forty-five on Friday evenings, we have Moore Anniversary and 
Aryan Reunion to remember. On these two occasions there was afforded what 
the boys would term. "A Regular Dance with real music." 

The Class of 1921 can say that we were the first to be granted the privi- 
lege of dancing at the West Chester State Normal School. We appreciate the 
fact that we have realized that which former classes have looked upon as "The 
Impossible." 

As a class, we are very happy to have enjoyed such a rare opportunity 
during the year. We shall never forget our good times in the gymnasium and 
shall always be very grateful to our kind and thoughtful Principal and to the 
entire Faculty for granting us this unprecedented privilege in the history of 
our school. 

RUTH S. SHARP 





i_ 


W4 \ ' f^.J' m\M 


4 





'Before 1920" 



The Dance "After 1920" 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 123 



12 MARCH 1923 



OF THE 



DqNMMtf of 



Gyir. Shov at the Normal. 
The* aiyiuul demonstration of the 
Health Education Department of the 
West Chester State Normal School 
will be lipid in the gymnasium on 
Friday evening. March 16th. under 
direction of Dr. Charle* B. Lewis, 
when the sir's will entertain with 
pretty inarches, folk dances, exercises 
with the wands, dumb bell*, games, 



Dr. Charles B. Lewis, head of the 
department of health, Is receiving 
much credit for the co-operation 
shown by his students in the special 
department wiio have assisted him in 
varnishing and otherwise brighten- 
ing the apparatus. Some new ap- 
paratus for the gymnasium has been 
purchased, thus adding to the equip- 
ment. 



NORMAL GYMNASIUM 

Friday Evening, March 16th, 1923 

at 7.45 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 
West Chester, Pa. 



17 MARCH 1923 



Program 



1 Marching Juniors 

2 Wands Seniors 

3 Dances • • Juniors 

(a) Pop Goes the Weasel 

(b) Cshebogar 

(c) Irish Lilt 



4 Corrective Exercises 



Seniors and Juniors 



5 Apparatus Work .... Seniors, and Juniors and 

Health Education 

6 Dances Seniors, Music Supervisors 

(a) Gopak 

(b) Gipsy Dance 

7 Dumb Bells Juniors 

8 Games Juniors and Health Education 

9 Mimetic Exercises Seniors 

10 Dances Health Education 

(a) Norwegian Mountain March 
(b 1 Gathering Peascods 

Health Education Staff 

Charles B. Lbwis, A.M., M.D., Director 
Herbert L. Mathbrs, B.S. 
Mira Wallacb 
Naomi E. George] 
Alice C. Schriver 
Llella M. Erion, Nurse 



In the Normal School Gymnasium 
last evening, the Physical and Health 
Education Department gave its an- 
nual demonstration of work with a 
large attendance of interested friends 
as audience. 

It was practically a "girls' exhibi- 
tion, the young men taking part in 
only 'one of the exercises. 

The affair was most finished in ex- 
ecution, the young people working 
■with precision and snap. Scarcely 
a word of command was given dur- 
ing the course of an exercise, a ges- 
ture from the teacher being sufficient 
to keep the big classes of half a 
hundred or more working in per- 
fect unison. -^ . \~\ 

Dr. Charles B. Lewis, -director of 
the department, was in general 
charge, but the work of training the 
girls had been done by Miss . Mira 
"Wallace. Naomi E. George (Mrs. Nor- 
man George), and Miss Alice . C. 
Schriver. Miss Luella M. Erion. the 
nurse, was present and is a member 
of the Health Education Staff. 
CORRECTIVE WORK. 

A new feature in this year's work 
is the stressing of corrective work in 
the gymnasium. One of the numbers 
on the programme showed the work 
of this class, in which are assembled, 
those pupils who show by physical 
examination that they have some 
physical handicap, which properly di- 
rected exercises will help, or cure. 

There were exercises of various 
sorts for straightening the spine, ex- 
panding the chest, strengthening feet 
and ankles and for overcoming other 
defects. The girls appeared much 
Interested in the work and are given 
close supervision by the instructors. 

The programme opened with 
marching, by a group of Juniors, who 
filled the floor. Their ev61utions 
were In excellent form and in strict 
time to phonograph music. The girls 
In their white "middies." and red ties 
looked very natty and well set up. 

A large group of Senior girls, dis- 
tinguished by black tles.went through 
a complicated wand drill with what 
■eemd to be absolute accuracy. 

Three gay little dances. "Pop, Goes 
the "Weasel." "Cshebogar," and "Irish 
Lilt," the latter a cross between the 
old fashioned jig and a Highland 
Fling, were gaily danced by Junior 
glfs. 



PERFECT DISCIPLINE. 
During the last named dance, one 
of the girls. Miss Beatrice Smith, 
Fuddenly dropped to the floor and 
lay still. There was a quick com- 
mand on the part of the teacher.Miss 
Schriver, the dance stopped, but the 
girls stood absolutely still In their 
places, while Dr. Lewis find one or 
two of the young men carried out the 
victim of a sprained knee. Then the 
dance went on as though nothing had 
Tiappened. Later in the evening Miss 
^mith returned to the room, but took 
no further part in the exercises. 

Sdiiior and Junior students train- 
ing in the special Health Education 
'Department, gave some interesting 
exhibitions of apparatus work, rope 
climbing, work on the flying rings, 
'jumping, etc.. all done gracefully and 
■with ease and finish. Miss Dorothy 
T.eahey, Miss Heimbach and Miss 
Rosella Dougherty. students who 
have won their "Letters." did partic- 
ularly fine work In this line. 

Juniors gave an excellent exhibition 
of work with dumb bells and the Sen- 
iors demonstrated gracefully, "Mim- 
etic Exercises." imitating the throw- 
ing of a, base ball, batting, swimming 
jnd vigorous arm and leg exe>cislng 
movements. 

' Juniors and students, of Health Ed- 
ucation played several wildly exciting 
games, with tenpins, bean bags, bas- 
ket ball and Indian clubs, four .'or 
Pve games going oh at one time amid 
deafening cheers and gay laughter. 

Several very pfetty folk dances 
v.-pre attractive parts of the pro- 
gramme. 

The final ones. "Norweltran Moun- 
tain March." and "Gathering Peas- 
cods/' being danced by both girls 
anrfyoune ltifflrr — The\r "were ""■partic- 
ularly prettv and graceful because of 
the colored scarfs held'ln the hands 
of the dancers and graoefullv waved 
ns ">ev went through the figures. 

Before the end of the exhibition 
three large bouquets of roses were 
presented to the three lady teachers. 
Miss Rosella Tioughertv making the 
brief presentation speech. 

ConirratuW'ons were showered upon 
dirertnrs and participants at the con- 
clusion of the afTair. for which only 
heartv commendations were heard. 



124 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 




Girls' Gymnasium Exhibition 

N March 16, the girls held their annual gymnasium exhibition. 
All who witnessed this demonstration agreed that it equalled if 
not surpassed all previous demonstrations. 

The demonstration opened with the Junior marching tactics, 
which was beautifully and rhythmically executed. They dis- 
played great ability in the intricate figure marching, which was 
brought to the climax by the- formation of "W" "C." 

Next on the program came the Senior wand drill. This 
complicated exercise was performed with absolute accuracy. The 
uniform movements of the girls gave a pleasing effect to those 
who viewed it from the balcony. 

A series of folk dances, by a Junior class, followed the wand drill. After 
these came the Senior mimetic exercises. These consisted of imitations of 
archery, shot-put, bowling, base ball and swimming, which were so effectively 
carried out that they seemed almost actual engagements. 

One of the new features in this year's exhibition was the corrective exer- 
cises. These exercises, conducted in a special class in the basement of the gym- 
nasium, are designed to correct certain deformities such as round-shoulders, 
hollow-back, etc. This department has been under the direction of Mrs. Naomi 
E. George, who has made remarkable progress in her work. 

A series of three-minute games was energetically engaged in by a very 
large class of Juniors. These were followed by a number of folk-dances by a 
Senior Class. 

The last and most impressive feature of the program was the several 
dances by the Health Education Group. The unusual and impressive char- 
acteristic about this number was the participation of the young men of this 
group. The colored scarfs, red, yellow and blue, which were held by the 
dancers, made the final number a most impressive sight. 








16 March 1923 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 125 



ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION 



22 MARCH 1924 



ot the 



Department of ^ia%'-^u*aiimr 

NORMAL GYMNASIUM 

Friday Evening, March 21st 
1924 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 
WEST CHESTER. PA. 

Program 



. Senior 
Junior 
Junior 



1. MARCHING DRILL 

2. WANDS 

3. DANCES 

(a) Reap the Flax 

(b) - Oxdansen 

4. CORRECTIVE EXERCISES Senior and Junior 



5 APPARATUS WORK 

Senior, Jun.or. Health Education and 
Music Supervisor 



6. : MIMETIC EXEROSHS ^ ^ ^^ 



. Senior 



7. DANCES 

. (a) Kamarinskia 
(bl Ribbon Dance 



8 ' C *^ S Junior, Health Education and Mu«c 
Supervisor 



q. dumb Bells 
10. DANCES 



. . .Senior 
Health Education 



(a) Troika 

(b) Tarantella 

Health Education Staff 

CHARLES BT LEWIS, A.M., M.D.. Director 
HERSCHEL L. MOSIER, B.S. 

Mira Wallace 
Naomi E. George 

ALICE C. SCHRIVER 
LUELLA IvL ERION. Nurse 



BIG, BRIGHT SHOW 

IN NORMAL GYM. 

Annual Demonstration of Health Edu- 
cation Department of School. 

Hundred* of Pretty GIrU Perform 

Wonderful Gjuiunstic StuiltM 

Tout Entertained Large 

Gathering. 

"Practice gymnastics not foe mere 
strength, but for good health," so 
reads an old maxim. 

The annual public demonstration of 
the Department of Health Education 
of the • West Chester State Normal 
School, was given last evening in thu 
spacious gymnasium of the local edu- 
cational institution. In the presence of 
a large gathering'of ^interested, appre- 
ciative { and enthusiastic spectators, 
who thronged" the building and were 
highly entertained for two hour*, In a 
continuous performance, with some- 
thing doing all the time and not a 
single dull moment, and thaj. thrilled 
and* evoked storms of applause. 

This year's show was bigger and 
better than ever before, and Barnum's 
"greatest show on earth" with the 
most wonderful performers of the 
earth was outrivaled and eclipsed by 
the girls of the Normal School, under 
the direction 0I L>r. Charles B. .Lewis, 
of the Health-Ed. Department, ably 
assisted by Miss Mira Wallace. Miss 
Alice C. ■ Schriver, Mrs. Naomi E. 
George, Luella M. Erion, and Herschol 
L. Mosier, of the Health-Ed. staff. 

All the girls who participated in the 
several events were prettily attired in 
white blouses, dark bloomers, white 
shoes, the Seniors wearing r-2d* ties. 
and the others, black. They presented 
an attractive appearance as they ap- 
peared on the floor in various groups. 

For the several marches, music was 
furnished on the piano by Miss Dot 
Smith, while the music for the. drills 
was furnished by a- phonograp.i. 
SENIORS WIN APPLAUSE". 

The big show was opened with a 
marching drill by thirty-two girls of 
the Senior Class, who marched into 
the gym. with ^ marked military pre- 
cision, under command of Miss Wal- 
lace, who took her position o n an ele- 
vated platform and therefrom directed 
the various movements of the squads 
in their marching and wheelings, 
forming various figures, and winning 
much applause for their proficiency. 
JUNIORS ON DECK. 

Provided with wands 140 gins, the 
flower of the Junior Clasa, marched 
into the gymnasium, and under direc- 
tion of Miss Schriver entertained with 
many intricate movements and com- 
binations that displayed splendid co- 
ordination of mind and muscle. These 
girls as they made their exit wore fol- 
lowed by rounds of tumultuous ap- 
plause. 



THE JUNIOR 'DANCE. 
Following rapidly came dances by 
l;o Juniors: (a) Reap the Flax; tb) 
Oxdansen. In groups of five, in* girls 
under direction of Miss Schriver. gave 
a number of lively toot movements 
and toe balancing, with amusing head- 
bobbing stunts, and wrestling, and 
took their departure from the rieid ot 
triumphant in a gay jig and applause. 
Mrs. George supervised the demon- 
stration of corrective exercises, by tile 
80 Senior and Junior girls, who took 
positions in groups on the mats, lad- . 
ders, overhead bars, and other appar- 
atus, each group having chosen 
leader. 

BARNUM OUTDONE. 
The real big event was the exhibl-, 
tlon of apparatus work, by 80 S^rls 
from all the classes, that proved won- 
derful, marvelous, spectacular- that 
required muscular development and 
nerve. Under oversight of the squad 
leaders the girls climbed ropes to the 
huge rafters overhead; vaulted over^ 
the lofty pyramids; thrilled- the crowd 
with stirring stunts on the flying- 
rings and parallel bars, the buck and 
the horse, and other apparatus. 

It was some big show, with eight 
rings, the various stunts arousing re- 
peated and prolonged applause- 
MIMETIC EXERCISES. 
The mimetic exercises by 108 girls 
of the senior class and the music su- 
pervisors proved one of the features 
of the exhibition, and was also en- 
tertaining as the girls imitated 
movements in bowling, foot ball, put- 
ting the shot, boxing, base ball, etc;, 
that proved realistic andd evoked ap- 
plause. 

SENIORS DANCE. 
Senior class girls to the number of 
160, under' direction of Miss Wallace, 
contributed two pretty dances: (a), 
Kamarinskia; (b), Ribbon Dance. 
They appeared on the gym . floor in 
numerous strenuous movements of • 
the arms and legs and bodies, ending 
in posing by the groups. The ribbon 
dance was by groups and made a 
pretty scene. y 

FLOWERS PRESENTED. 
During the short intermission, Miss 
Emily Holten, -^ho has won a num- 
ber of letters and numerals for her 
proficiency in athletics, accom- 
panied by several other pretty girls, 
appeared in the center of the build-* 
ing. carrying large baskets of beauti- 
ful and fragrant flowers, which were 
presented to Misses Wallace, Schriv- 
er, Erion and Mrs. George, in a neat 
little speech by Miss Holten. Thun- 
ders of applause, greeted the recipi-' 
ents of these testimonials as they ap-; 
peared to receive the gifts. . 

SOME GAMES ENJOYED. 
About 120 girls of the Junior. 
Health Education and Music Super- 
visor classes then entertained "with a 
number of varied games, including 
passing bean bags, etc., in groups in 
charge of leaders. 

These games proved extremely, 
lively and excitiing and seemed to bo 
enjoyed by the participants afi well, 
as tho onlookers. 



126 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



r^S 



<*>2PPI 




r 



\ 









hf* *4? 



<i* 4- 



1923 FOOTBALL TEAM 



The football team in the fall of 1923 consisted of a unique 
group of sixteen men. With only 100 males enrolled, a great 
deal was asked of this squad. By the end of the season on 
November 1 7 they compiled the best record of any football 
team in the history of the college. Led by Captain Joe Pitts, 
undefeated, scoring 205 points, and unscored on in seven 
games, their names were Herman Hoopes, Israel Corb, John 
Greising, Gordon Mink, Ken Mateer, London Jones, Emmet 
Burke, Hugh Doyle, Ken Townsend, Morris Gordon, John 
Brennan, Warren Burton, Jim Nider, Frank Bennett, and Bill 
Nancarrow. Coach Herschel Mosier and Manager Fred 
Singleton must share this honor. Two of the squad, London 
Jones and Warren Burton were the first blacks to be 
represented among the sport elite at the Normal. London 
Jones would give many years of service as teacher and coach in 
Chester as well as stride the boards as a Thespian. Warren 
Burton will serve as an outstanding educator over forty years; 
his most recent assignment being with Cheyney State College. 
Warren was also an accomplished musician, Boy Scout leader, 
football official, and is a prime community leader in West 
Chester; again athletics, music, drama, and all performing arts 
are not concerned with what a man is but what he can do. 

This sport season saw a surge of school spirit with the 
development of a "Ned Hausknecht-coached" fifty-girl 
Cheer-All squad who accompanied the team to Shippensburg. 
Following the victory a "casket" labeled "West Chester" was 
captured, shipped to the Normal via Railway Express and 
received at the depot by the Cheer-All girls led by 
"undertaker" Jerry Deisenroth, and marched through the 
town back to the school. The students were now caught by the 
spirit existing between the music and physical education 

activities balanced by dramatics and debate presentations. It 

was good to be a student in the fall of 1923 



Teacher/Coach Herschel Mosier's photo is 
from left number four in the second row. He 
was a member of the Physical Training staff 
during the Fall of 1923. In this short period of 
service he coached the first undefeated football 
team in the university's history. 

Another historic "first" occurs with the 
formation of a cheer leading group coached by 
"Uncle" Ned Hausknecht — director of the 
Music Department at the school. 




'v : 



ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION ' 

of the . ;_, , - . 

Apartment of ^^Wta,.-. 

NORMAL GYMNASIUM ' O V' ? 

Friday Evening, March 21st . ': .:. 
1924 , 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 
WKST CHESTER. PA. 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 127 



Vol.1 THE GREEN STONE State Normal School, 
===== March 24, J924 === 

GYM EXHIBITION SCORES BIG HIT 



Exceeds All Previous Performances in Number, 
Interest and Skill 

"Wasn't it great?" 

"It must have taken a lot of practice!" 

"Did you ever see so many people?" 

Sucti were a few of the comments heard on all 
sides ahout the girls' annual gymnastic exhibi- 
tion held on Friday, March 21. 

Full is right. That gym was FULL. The 
track, side lines, stairs, all Mere jammed with the 
faculty, student body, relatives and friends. They 
were a jovial, good-natured audience and played 
a large part in making the evening a success. 

The girl performers looked fine in their spotless 
white middies and "sneaks." (The result of many 
precious hours spent in the laundry.) We'll wager 
that the poor old gym was surely surprised at the 
unexpected sight. 

"Mark time — march! One-two-three-tour. 
Forward march !" This was the voice of- Miss 
Wallace as she ushered in the Seniors for the first 

4 

number. This class demonstrated marching 
tactics and Pershing himself would have been 
proud of them. They had all the pep, form, and 
minuteness of a regular army squad. This .was 
followed by two junior numbers, one a wand drill, 
the other dances. The wand exercises were done 
to music and presented a very attractive spectacle 
because of their precision and unity. The varia- 
tions added greatly to the general effect. The 
two junior dances. Reap and the Flax and Ox- 
dansen. were favorites with the spectators. 

The members of the corrective class, a mixture 
of Juniors. Seniors, and Music students, demon- 
strated the work which they are doing under the 
able supervision of Mrs. George. These exer- 
cises were ample proof of the fact that well-plan- 
ned aids to health and physical perfection are 
afforded for all those who need it. 



Then the stunts of the evening began. The 
various pieces of apparatus were set up and the 
acrobats of the school performed. They gave US 
all the thrills offered by a three-ring circus and 
then some. There were flying ring performers, 
horse jumpers, box vaulters, experts on the vari- 
ous bars, and yes, there were even some monkeys. 
Honest Injun ! Didn't you see em climbing the 
ropes? We did. 

After the circus the remainder of Miss Schriv- 
er's cadets presented the mimetics. Base ball, 
volley ball, foot ball, bowling, boxing, all were 
imitated and believe me they looked like the 
real thing. We wouldn't have gone in reach of 
those boxers for worlds. After this the Seniors 
executed two pretty dances, Kamerinski and the 
Ribbon Dance. 

The next number was games. About one hun- 
dred of the girls became kids again, just for a 
night and played children's games with a zest. 
After the games were over and the winners de- 
cided, the Seniors gave a dumbell drill. (This 
wasn't any reflection on the Senior class). The 
drills were catchy but the Seniors had them 
mastered completely. 

The evening's program was brought to a close 
by two charming dances. Troika and Tarentella. 
These were given by the Health Ed fellows and 
girls and were well liked. 

Everyone pronounced the exhibition a huge 
success. However, we must realize that back of 
every success there is a reason. Someone has 
worked, and worked hard to create that success. 
In this case it isn't at all difficult to spot these 
workers — the people who have made our exhi- 
tion posible. We are sure that the whole school 
joins The GREEX Stone in giving three hearty 
cheers and a tiger for Miss Wallace, Miss 
Schriver, and the whole Physical Ed department 
in recognition of their efforts. 




21 March 1924 Show 



128 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



(tola' $Bttmafitum £xt?tbttum 

Friday evening. March 21st. was the tl«il«* >et aside this year for the annual 
dc.mnnst rat inn of I'hysical Kduclion. If such a thing Ik 1 possible, tliis year's event 
excelled all previous ones. The inelelllenl wealhel iliil not keen the crowds away, 
for the gym was lilted to its groatesl capacity. 'I'lie demonstration started promptly 
at ~i A~>. and continued without a break until the end. 

The opening number was a marching drill by thirty-two Senior girls, who 
displayed unusual ability in the line of figure inarching. Following this was a 
wand drill hy a large group of Junior.-. The drill consisted of a number of move- 
lnents in unison, then variations of the same movements. Xcxl in order were two 
pleasing dances — "Ilea]! the Flax" and "Oxdanson"— -by a class of Juniors. These 
vcre followed by a series of corrective gymnastics hy eighty girls from both Senior 
and Junior classes. 

The next number, apparatus work. alTordcd opportunity lor displaying in- 
dividual accomplishments. F.vcry niece of apparatus in the gym was in use. and 
the audience was thrilled by the skill and daring of the various girls who par- 
ticipated. The Juniors and Music Supervisors then presented a scries of mimetic 
exercises which consisted of imitations of kicking a football, pitching, catching, 
and batting a baseball, and other similar activities. The folk dances which fol- 
lowed were Kamarinskia and Ribbon Dance. The rigorous steps and arm move- 
ments of the typical Russian dance were in pleasant contrast with the more 
restrained movements id' the English dance. Following the dancing, the Juniors. 
Supervisors and Health Eds joined in playing a variety of games, and seemed to 
enjoy themselves while pleasing the spectators. 

The Seniors next exhibited with impressive accuracy a dumbbell drill in which 
were a number of intricate variations. The rhythmic motion of lliis mass of one 
hundred and twenty girl- was especially effective. Easl on the program were two 
dances by the young men and young women of the Health Kducatiou Group. 
These were executed with unusual grace and skill and proved to be a lining finale 
for the evening's program. 

It is impossible 1o bestow sufficient credit upon those instructor- in the Health 
Education Department — Mrs. Ifeorge. .Miss Schriver. and Mi-s Wallace — whose un- 
tiring efforts made possible Hie very successful exhibition. They have indeed 
added new laurels to the work of their department in the West Chester State 
Normal School. 




21 March 1924 Show 



ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 129 



2. 



4. 



5. 



7. 

8. 



10. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

Friday Evening, March 27, 1925 



Figure Marching , . SENIOR 

Instructor, MlSS SCHRIVER 

Calisthenics JUNIOR 

Instructor, MRS. GEORGE 

Dances SENIOR 

(a) Chariot Barn Dar.ce 

(b) Schottische Couple Dance 

Instructor, MlSS SCHRIVER 

Games JUNIOR 

Instructor. MRS. GEORGE 

Dances SENIOR and MUSIC SUPERVISOR 

(a) Taotoli 

(b) Tralicn 

Instructor, MlSS SCHRIVER 

Mimetic Exercises JUNIOR 

Instructor, MRS. GEORGE 

Apparatus V/ork HEALTH EDUCATION 

Dances JUNIOR and MUSIC SUPERVISOR 

(a) Indian Dance 

(b) Varsouvienne 

Instructor, MRS. GEORGE 

V/and Drill . .' SENIOR 

Instructor, MlSS SCHRIVER 

Dance HEALTH EDUCATION 

Instructor, MlSS SCHRIVER 



HEALTH EDUCATION STAFF 
Charles B. Lewis, A. M., M. D., Director 

JOHN P. MacGoVERN, Pb.B.. Men's Athletics 
NAOMI E. GEORGE, Individual Gymnastics 
ALICE C. SCHRIVER, Senior Physical Training 
A. IRENE HORNER, B. S.. Junior Physical Training 
CHA?XOTTE M. WALLS, B. S.. Hygiene 
MARY M. GLANCE, R. N., Nurse 

4 APRIL 1925 



GO TO THE GYM ON APRIL J AND 3 
Though the main event of this particular sea- 
son is our annual gymnasium exhibition, there are 
some other coming activities which are thoroughly 
expressive of the work of the health education 
department and which are not to be entirely over- 
shadowed. On April 1st. the Model School child- 
ren will give a demonstration of their gymnasium 
work. Let's go to enjoy the kiddies' performance 
and incidentally to gain seme practical hints for 
future use. 



17 MARCH 1925 



HEALTH EDUCA- 
TION EXHIBIT TO 

BE FEATURED 



West Chester School Children 
to Take Part 



GYMNASIUM SCENE OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION 

Health F^ds Attend In Body Typical Lessons, Mass Drill, Indian 

Tin- college gymnasium was for the Club Drill, Tumbling, and Pyramids. 

second time I In- scene! of the animal . Pupils from the first to the eighth grade 

demonstration of the physical education i took part in the program. It was a 



work being carried on in the West 
Chester Schools. This demonstration 
which took place Friday afternoon and 
evening was well planned and executed, 
in the aftrnoon the children of the 



splendid example of the results achieved 
by the hard work and cooperation be- 
tween teacher and pupil. 

In the evening the Junior and Senior 
High School students demonstrated. 



Riddle, Gay, High, and Model sehools The events which included maze running 
participated in a program including and marching, wand exercises, Dutch 
Rhythms and Song Games, Mother character dance, Indian club drill. 
Goose Plays and Games, Folk Dances, "America" dance, apparatus, tumbling, 



There have been gym exhibi- 
tions before, but none quite as 
elaborate. as that which is planned 
for the school children of West 
Chester, next Friday afternoon in 
the gymnasium at the Normal 
School. Fourteen hundred children 
are to take part in the various exer- 
cises, drills, and games. It seems 
logical to believe that many people 
on this campus will be interested 
in the demonstration because of its 
correlation with the work they will 
be doing later on as they go out to 
teach. 

On the evening of the same day, 
the West Chester High School stu- 
dents, who number seven hundred, 
will give their demonstration. 
This exhibition also is open to the 
parents and friends of the students. 



stunts,' games, dumbbell drill, "Minuet", 
free exercises, Japanese fan dance, and 
pyramids were somewhat more intricate 
than those of the afternoon. 

The directors who instructed the stu- 
dents were Mr. Paul Shaffer, Mr. Harold 
Zimmerman, Miss Mereea E. Miller, Miss 
KIsie Strickland, and Miss Edna Weil 
lo them belong much praise, for the 
exhibition was a splendid example of 
the stride of advancement which has 
taken place in Health Education during 
the last few years. 

Several Health Ed students helped 
in the actual execution of the events. 
These were Frances Johnson, Evelyn 
Hursh, Catherine Rhodes, Clarinda Van 
Loon, Dorothy Ganges. 



130 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



1 APRIL 1925 



6 APRIL 1925 GREENSTONE 



GYM EXHIBIT WILL BE 

HELD THIS FRIDAY 



Come View the Spotless Army and Watch Its 
Plan of Campaign 

Are all of you coming to the big event? Are 
all of you ready? Got your middies starched 
and white? Are vour bloomers pressed? Is vour 
tie folded? ARE YOUR SNEAKS CLEAN? 
(If not, why not? Arlington does a very nice 
white job in case you can't get them real clean). 

These constitute our daily gym intelligence test. 
If we can follow directions at all we'll surely look 
like the milky way, as far as whiteness is con- 
cerned, for Miss Schriver and Mrs. George go 
over that list of questions every day. And every 
day they add some other suggestions such as long 
hoisery with black appendages, natural complex- 
ions and non-excessive waves. We're betting that 
Miss America won't be able to cope with us at 
all when we come bedecked in our complete and 
angelic regulation gym costume. 

BOYS — Don't be alarmed abowt the actions 
of your lady friends this week. Let us offer a 
few suggestions for your peace of mind. If you 
have noticed girls wrestling with brooms — they 
aren't insane. They are merelv victims of the 
wand drill. If you see them walking peacefully 
along and then suddenly leap into the air and go 
through some awful contortions — that's probably 
in preparation for a dance. If you see some 
Junior girls out in the field going through the 
motions of football, baseball, and tennis without 
pig-skin, ball or glove, that's just a few of their 
mimetic drills. Or, if you are sitting in the lobby 
with a coy health-ed young lady and she suddenly 
hurdles a chair or shinnies up one of the pillars — 
she is just under the impression that she is doing 
apparatus work. No, on the whole, fellows, we'd 
sav steer clear of the girls until after the exhibit. 




GYM EXHIBIT SCORES BIG HIT 



Performance Goes Off Without a Hitch 

It's all over now ! Gone but not forgotten. 
The hours spent waiting in the laundry, the 
hours of sleep that were lost memorizing such 
things as that wand drill, were really worth 
while after all. Things went off with a snap, 
there were no delays between numbers, in fact 
the organization was perfection personified. 

From the moment that the Music "Sups" 
marched on the floor and went thru their figure 
marching until the Health Eds, all dolled up 
in the uniform of a U. S. Gob, danced the 
Sailor's Horn Pipe, there wasn't a moment that 
wasn't taken up by mighty interesting exhibi- 
tion work. 

It was a big thrill to see the girls form the 
well-known letters of W. C, and it was equally 
thrilling to watch Jimmy Nider on the rings. 
When Dot Wells climbed the rope to the very 
top we all felt like joining in that, "Whoopee!" 




Skating on Normal "Pond" 



DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 131 



9 DECEMBER 1925 



HEALTH EDS. ENJOY 

EXCEPTIONAL TREAT 

Witness The Irish — Bryn Mawr 
Hockey Match 

We've often heard and have seen 
things that interest our whole na- 
tion, but a short time ago, the 
Health Eds. took one step further 
by being spectators at the Inter- 
national hockey game between the 
representative Irish and Bryn Mawr 
teams. Of course, this never-to-be- 
forgotton treat was brought about 
by our own Miss Schriver who so 
willingly took us to the fray. 

We shall always remember the 
fine spirit which was felt through- 
out the entire game and how thrill- 
ed we were to see our Bryn Mawr 
girls rush the ball down the field 
and enter the Irish striking circle — 
but, alas, only to be driven out by 
the bang-up defense by the goal 
keeper. Sometimes this noted 
player kicked (yes, that's her pri- 
vilege) the ball to the 25 yard line. 
All Professional Women 

Before and after the game, due 
to Miss Schriver, we talked with 
the players and to our surprise, we 
learned that some of the Irish play- 
ers are doctors, lawyers, and teach- 
ers. Captain Cummins has been an 
ardent hockey player for many 
years, having played in twenty- 
two inter-national games. 

Here's hoping we have some 
more similiar treats. 

GYMNASIUM EXHIBITION 

All Girls Will Participate in the 
Affair 

Due to the fact that the exhibi- 
tion will be held much earlier than 
usual, the whole department is hard 
at work to make the affair much 
better than usual. (If such a thing 
is possible ! ) 

One of the special features of 
this year's exhibition will be a de- 
monstration of the work done in 
the corrective classes. This side of 
the Health Education Department 
is most interesting and highly in- 
structive. 

Added to this will be the usual 
marching, free hand exercises, 
wand and dumbbell drills, mimetics 
and dances. The Health Eds will 
demonstrate their powers on vari- 
ous Dieces of apparatus. 



ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION 

of the Practice Work in 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. WEST CHESTER, PA. 
Friday Evening, March 12, 1926, at 7.45 



1 . Figure Marching JUNIOR 

Instructor, MISS HORNER 

2. Calisthenics JuNIOR 

Instructor, MISS HORNER 

3 Dance SENIOR AND MUSIC SUPERVISOR 

Yon and I (Dutch) 

Instructor, MISS SCHRIVER 

4. Games JUNI0R 

Instructor, MISS HORNER 

5. Mimetic* SeN1 ° R 

Instructor, MISS SCHRIVER 

6 £>ances JUNIOR AND MUSIC SUPERVISOR 

(a) Hunsdon House (English) 

(b) Dwarf Dance 

Instructor, MISS HORNER 

7. Individual Exercises 

Instructor, MRS. GEORGE 

8. Apparatus Work HEALTH EDUCATION 

9. Dance SenioR 

Neapolitan Tarentella (Italian) 

Instructor, MISS SCHRIVER 

1 0. Wand and Dumb Bell Drill SENIOR 

Instructor, MISS SCHRIVER 

, j Dance HEALTH EDUCATION 

Dal (Swedish) 

Instructor, MISS Hl-RZOG 



HEALTH EDUCATION STAFF 
CHARLES B. LEWIS, A.M., M.D., Director 
JAMES F. MACGOVERN, Ph.B.. Men's Athletics 
NAOMI E. GEORGE. Individual Gymnastics 
ALICE C. SCHRIVER. Senior Physical Training 
A. IRENE HORNER. B.S., Junior Physical Training 
GERTRUDE E. HERZOG, B.S.. Health Education 
MILDRED HOLLOBAUGH, R.N.. B.A.. Hygiene 
Lulu V. Walker, B.S., A.M., Nutrition 
Mary M. Glance. R.N., Nurse 

EVA D'SSINGER, R.N.. Nurse 

Girls Participate m All Athletics 

SOMEHOW or other we cannot talk of our experiences here at W. C. 
S N. S. without, sooner or later, referring to the gymnasium or 
the athletic held. This side of the school-life has been so tull ot 
good-natured fun and pure enjoyment that it stands out sharply against 
a background formed bv the numerous other activities. 

0°ne cannot^give a review of the work done in this field without taking 
the gymnastic exhibitions into consideration. It was Miss Irene Horner 
who first put us through our paces on the gym floor. That memorable night 
of our first exhibition, when we realized for the first time what it really meant 
to be a part of that great system! 



132 DR. CHARLES B. LEWIS 



17 MARCH 1926 THE GREEN STONE 



GYMNASIUM EX- 
EXHIBITION CROWNED 
BETTER THAN EVER 

AH the Girls of the School 

Demonstrate Work in 

This Department 

HEALTH ED BOYS OFFER 
THRILLS 



The gymnasium exhibition was 
"great" in every sense of the 
word. The instructors are to be 
complimented on the manner in 
which the affair was run off. 
Every person knew where she was 
expected to go and, what's more, 
went there. Each member fol- 
lowed the one before with a snap 
and precision that denoted excel- 
lent planning and supervision. 
There were no "waits." Promptly 
at 7:45 the first number marched 

on th« floor. 

Junior Participation 
Figure marching by the Juniors 
started off the evening. Their 
straight lines deserve a word of 
praise and, of course, the forma- 
tion of "W. C." at the end was 
mighty clever. The Junior Cal- 
isthenics that followed could put 
Walter Camp's "Daily Dozen" to 
shame. When it came to the: 
games, we were envious. The girls 
seemed to be having such a good 
time that we wanted to get right 
in ourselves. 

However, it was the "Dwarf 
Dance" that was one of* the hits 
of the evening. The rhythm of 
this dance was very catchy. We'd 
like to see it again ! 

The first Senior dance *~~~ ?- 
riot of fun. To the tune of "Oh 
Where, Oh Where Has My Little 
Dog Gone?" the dancer" became 
real "Dutchv." ■ "Turentella", 



"given in costume, was very attrac- 
tive and well done. 

A series of complicated exer- 
cises with wands and dumb bells 
held no terrors for this group of 
Seniors. But it was the Mimetics 
that were a source of amusement 
to the audience. 

"That's base ball !" 
"Now the3''re throwing the 
discus !" 

And there were no doubts in the 
mind of the audience when the girls 
"roughed it up" in boxing. 
Individual Exercises 
The Individual Exercises were 
introduced by a large sign board 
which explained what each exercise 
was for. With some of the 
Health Ed girls in charge, each 
group of students went from one 
series to another. This demon- 
stration gave us an excellent op- 
portunity of seeing the type of 
work that Mrs. George is giving 
in this department. 
Health Eds Show Unusual Talent 
Individual Exercises 
The Health Eds made th«ir first 
appearence on the the floor in 
apparatus work. The ropes, 
buck, horse, parallels, high jump, 
flying rings, Swedish boxes, in fact 
every piece of apparatus in the 
gvm, was put into use. The boys 
went thru their stunts with a dar- 
ing that brought forth shrieks 
from the onlookers. 

Later in the Swedish dance, 
"Dal" they showed that they were 
not only acrobats but followers of 
grace and rhythm as well. The 
picturesque costumes added great- 
ly to this number. 

So thus ended the exhibition. 
All du£ . credit belongs to the 
Health Education instructors, Dr. 
Lewis, Miss Schriver, Miss Hor- 
ner, Miss Herzog, and Mrs. 
George, for it is they who made 
such a splendid thing possible. 



Alice A. Schriver to Leave West 
Chester Teachers' College 

West Chester, Aug. 27. — Miss Alic« 
A. Schriver, since 1922 a member oj 
the faculty in the health education! 
department of the West Chester Stat* 
Teachers' College, nas resigned hep 
position to become assistant professor 
in health education at Washi&gtaa 
University, St. Louis. 

Miss Schriver is a graduate of th» 
local Teachers' College and received 
her B. S. degree at New York Uni- 
versity. She has been studying for 
the M. A. degree at the University 
of Pennsylvania, and has taught for 
several years at Chautauqua Institute. 
New York. 







ALK'K r SCHRIVER 

W ( *• 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 133 




This building is erected 

by the 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

graduates and other friends 

of the West Chester 

State Normal School 

as a 

Loving Memorial 

to 

George Morris Philips 

Principal and Upbuilder of the 

School 1881-1920 

A man of first rank in the educational work 

Gracious in personality, Excellent in scholarship 

Strong in executive ability, Superior in citizenship 

Firm in religious faith, Faithful in friendship 

Beneficent in Influence, 

He being dead, yet speaketh 



V. Dr. James G. Bliss 

Director of Physical Education 1927-1930 

Born 25 November 1891 he attended the public schools in Canton Ohio following which he 
matriculated at Ohio State University in the fields of Forestry and Physical Education. 

He received his Bachelor's Degree in 1914 and was successively employed as an Elementary 
Physical Education Teacher in West Virginia and in Ohio. During this period he continued graduate 
work at Ohio State and Harvard Universities. 

From 1917 to 1919 he served in the United States Army as Athletic Director of the Fifth Infantry 
Division. After World War I he accepted positions in Physical Education at Miami University, Oxford, 
Ohio and at both Columbia University and New York University until 1926. 



134 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 

Dr. James G. Bliss Staff Assistants 1927-1930 




NAME 

Dr. James G. Bliss 

Director Health Education; 
M.A., Ph.D., New York University 



SERVICE 
DATES 

1927-1930 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 

15 March 1929 







Alice C. Schriver 

B.S., New York University 



1922-1929 



(See Dr. Lewis Section) 




James F. McGovem 

Ph.B., Muhlenburg 



1925-1928 



(See Dr. Lewis Section) 




Earle C. Waters 

B.S., Syracuse University 



1928 



29 March 1928 M/W 

15 March 1929 M/W 

4 April 1930 M 




Eleanor V. Searing 

A.B., New Jersey College for Women 



1928-1930 



29 March 1928 M/W 

15 March 1929 M/W 

28 March 1930 W 




Vanessa Glenn 

A.B., Vassar College; 
M.A., Columbia University 



1928 



29 March 1928 M/W 




Dorothy Cross Remington 

B.S., Iowa State College; 
M.A. Columbia University 



1928 



29 March 1928 M/W 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 135 



NAME 



SERVICE 
DATES 



GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 




Mary G. Reese (R.N.) 

R.N., Moses T. Hospital 



1928 




Myra I. Wade 

B.A., Oberlin College; 

M.A., Columbia University 



1928 



15 March 1929 M/W 

25 January 1930 W 

20 February 1930 W 

15 March 1930 W 

28 March 1930 W 

26 May 1930 M/W Pageant 




Berenice L. Mueller 

A.B., Univ. of Kansas 



1928 



15 March 1929 M/W 

25 January 1930 W 

20 February 1930 W 

15 March 1930 W 

28 March 1930 W 

26 May 1930 M/W Pageant 




Anne M. Schaub 

B.S., Columbia University 



1930 



20 February 1930 W 

15 March 1930 W 

28 March 1930 W 

26 May 1930 M/W Pageant 



'/* 




V" ' 


1 


^ 


y 

i 



Eleanore Aldworth 

B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 



1930 



28 March 1930 W 
4 April 1930 




Gladys Bowen 

B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 



1930 



20 February 1930 W 

15 March 1930 W 

28 March 1930 W 

26 May 1930 M/W Pageant 



136 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



9 MARCH 1927 GREENSTONE 

PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION EXHIBITION 

HELD IN GYM 



14 MARCH 1927 



public Schools Give Demon- 
stration 



A. demonstration of the work in 
Physical Education for the grade 
schools of West Chester was given 
in the gymnasium, Friday, March 
4th. The parents and all people 
interested in the work of the child- 
ren were invited to be present. 
This was the first exhibition of its 
kind and was well attended. The 
program for the afternoon was as 
follows : 
Story Plays — 1st and 2nd Grades 

of High" Street. 
Dramatic Plays and Games — 1st 

and 2nd Grades of Gay Street. 
Mother Goose Rhythms — 1st and 

2nd Grades of Model and Biddle 

Street. 
Folk Dances and Games — 3rd 

Grades of all schools. 
Marching, Folk Dances and Games 

— 4th, Grades. . 
Mimetic Base Ball Drill, Tumbling 

— 5th and 6th Grades of Gay 

Street. 
Free Exercises, Folk Dances, 

Tumbling and Games — 5th and 

6th Grades of Gay Street. 
Safety First Drill, Folk Dances and 

Tumbling — 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th 

Grades of Gay Street. 
Wand Drill, Folk Dances and 

Games — 5th and 6th Grades of 

Model School and Biddle Street. 
The evening was devoted to the 
work of the Junior and Senior 
High School and was well attend- 
ed. The exhibitions as a whole 
were very successful and educa- 
tional. 



TRYOUTS HELD FOR 
APPARATUS EXHIBITION 

Coach Waters is Plcnsed With 
Results 

The elimination tryouts for the men's 
apparatus exhibition' to he held or th. 
twenty-ninth of tjiis month, was staged 
e:s ; Thursday night in the gymnasium 
under the critical eve of Professor 
Waters. 

The ti:M division of gymnasts to 
undergo the test were the "high bar" 
men. secondly, the "living ringers" and 
finally "the mat men." 



SCHOOL ATHLETICS 

IN NORMAL GYM 

Physical Education Exhibition Pleases 
Large Crowd. 

Parents and Others In Great Num- 
ber Witness Demonstration of 
Work Done In This Depart- 
ment. 

The first annual demonstration of 
physical education as taught In the 
Junior and Senior High Schools of 
this borough, which was given in the 
State Normal School gymnasium last 
evening proved a decided success 
from all standpoints, and those in 
charge were highly complimented on 
the success of their Initial venture. 

The seating arrangements provid- 
ed on the gym floor were all utilized 
and the balcony which circles the 
floor was also packed with spectators 
some time before the demonstration 
began. 

After a selection by the High 
School Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Floyd T. Hart, the first num- 
ber on the demonstration program, a 
marching exhibition by the 7th and 
Sth grade boys, was led by their in- 
structor, Mr. Hoffman, who gave the 
various commands which were exe- 
cuted In exact precision. 

Base ball mimetics were given by 
the 9th grade girls, led by Miss Elsie 
Strickland. The divers motions and 
actions of base ball, such as batting, 
catching and pitching were adapted 
rhythmically so as to present a co- 
ordination of mass action. 

The Senior High School boys then 
gave an exhibition of marching and 
were given their formation com- 
mands by Mr. Zimmerman. The 
girls of the Senior High, under the 
leadership of Mls« Mereeg Miller, 
gave a succession of wand exercises. 
An athletic drill of calisthenics by 
the Senior High School boys follow- 
ed this and were led by Mr. Zimmer- 
man. 

A clog dance, "The Campbells Are 
Coming," was well given by the 7th 
and Sth grade girls, under Miss 
Strickland. An Indian club drill by 
the Senior High School, boys was 
especially well done. 



Each contestant had to perform the 
prescribed required e?cercises. and then 
display his combination or specialty. 

.Mr. Waters, who was pleased with tbe 
first showing of his proteges under strain 
of observation, will undoubtedly have 
difficulty in choosing the men to take 
part on the apparatus. 

Out of approximately fifty contest- 
ants, there will be only twenty-five en- 
tered. 

The exhibit, from all appearances on 
Thursday night, will be a maze of hand- 
stands, angle swings, cut-offs, dislocates, 
hand springs, and cart wheels. 



A gypsy dance given by the Senior 
High girls was a colorful as well as 
an appealing dance. The girls were 
attired in bright gypsy costume and 
clicked their tamborlnes as they 
danced. Miss Miller led this num- 
ber. 

Free hand exercises by the Junior 
High School boys were next on the 
program and the exercises demon- 
strated a typical gym period in their 
school work. 

"Tumbling, stunts and games by 
the Junior High School boys and 
girls proved very enjoyable and in- 
teresting, but the main feature of the 
evening came last when the Senior 
High School boys, directed by Mr. 
Zimmerman, gave an exhibition of 
apparatus work, tumbling and pyra- 
mids. Cart-wheels, elephant rolls, 
walking on hands, forward rolls, and 
Innumerable other mat performances 
proved most engaging to the specta- 
tors. Harry Close, an accomplished 
tumbler of the group, won the ap- 
plause of the audience with his diffi- 
cult feats in which he was aided by 
Henry Smith and by Mr. Zimmer- 
man. Close has attracted consider- 
able notice as a tumbler and is 
steadily improving, although he 
gives a finished performance on the 
mats at the present time. This 
brought to a close the demonstra- 
tion- 

The affair was a most enJqyabMf 
one and gave the parents an opptir^ 
tunity to see what is being don« 
along the line of physical education 
in the schools. Superintendent 

Philips said: "It was a demonstra- 
tion of the actual work of this de- 
partment — no especial effort was 
made to stage an entertainment." 

A similar exhibition of the pri- 
mary grades was given in the after- 
noon and was also witnessed by a 
good sized gathering. 

Special acknowledgements were 
made on the printed programs of the 
demonstration to the High School 
Orchestra, Edith Holman and Edith 
Dender, the advertising committee, 
composed of Joseph Clark, Jack 
Pechln, Rudolph Weller and Harold 
Smith. The directors, Harold I. 
Zimmerman, W. Edward Hoffman. 
Miss Mercea Miller and Miss Elsie 
Strickland were all justified with the 
splendid success tff the exhibitions 
and received much praise for their 
work In fostering it. 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 137 



OF THE ACTIVITY PROGRAM IN 



paro tmmm 



NORMAL GYMNASIUM 
THURSDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 

AT 3.00 (FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN) 

FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 13, 

AT 7 4.'> 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 



ANDREW THOMAS SMITH, Pd.D., Prin 
*iMI L> G. lil.jSS, Ph D., Dim-lor of Health D 
A. IP!',:: HORNER, B.S. ; 
.1. !•". W.ieGOVERN, PK .;■;., 
GKR.TR.UDl'! HERZOG, H.S., 
MILDRED HOLLOBAL/'GH, R.N.. H.A 

West Chester, Pa., March 23, 1927 
"THE GREENSTONE" 

GYM EXHIBITION SHOWS 
SKILL AND STRENGTH 

Mammoth Performance Goes 
Smoothly to Conclusion 

The health education exhibition, 
which is an annual event of this 
institution was given in the Normal 
School gymnasium last Friday 
evening, all members of the physi- 
cal education classes taking part. 

The entertainment was opened 
with figure riarching bv the 
Juniors whose straight lines and 
the West Chewier formation won 
enthusiastic applause from the 
audience. This number was in 
charge of Miss Emerick. a Senior 
of the Health Education course. 



en 

1. FIGURE .MARCHING .... Junior, 

leader. MISS E.W: RICK 
Instructor, MlSS HORNFR 

2. SCHOOLROOM CYHNASTICS Juniors 

I eeiier. Miss CAl.DrRHt-.All 
Instructor. MlSS HORNFR 

3. DANCE S ""°" 

Newcastle (English) bv Sharp* 

/r?»frui-for. MlSS !!r.P7C; 

4. yLA'S AND GAMES . Juniors 

Ni!r<cv Jlhvmcs iml S<:n. , :n: 1 C.inm 
l>!.iy«i».u:K! Coru.s 
Stur.'.s 
17, 1927 ..,:,, '.!-. OKP 

.'. rrucf-i. iV'iSS : lOHr ■ ' 
',. SQ'JAD PRACTICE . . Senior, 

19^7 /•„..■'. r Miss '.:•. . 

/n.t.'r;.\ -.).• ".'"' M: !-."*", 

. .vnj'irs 

C. DANCE 

GnraWi ]\sni . i "ohshi bv CS^lit 

instructor, N'i.ss I ioUNi " 
, n.wrr ' • Professional Students 

7 - DANCE /r . rJ , y, ar 

Sc.irccrov. (Character Dance) 

/r»(ri«i-inr. MISS HERZOG 

8. FLOOR STUNTS (Croiipi) Senior* 

Leader. Miss MORRISON 
Instructor. Miss HFR'ZOC, 

0. APPARATUS ACTIVITIES OR STOUTS ^("frTsrTfw 

Imtructivs. THE STAFF 

,0 ELEMENS Of ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES . . • ■ Junio " 

I.-.s-.ructor. MISS HOUNF.R 

Professional Students 
p a | 11. DANCE „d Srd Year Mnsit 

iuvalion >p| ,.., .,,... in liel'.as 

;,..,., „,,„ r . m;ss llni/o; 

"A typical school room lesson". Miss Morrison, directed various 

directed by Miss Calderhead and groups of Seniors in floor stunts 

enacted by Junior classes, was which the health aducation students 

proved most entertaining and gave an exhibition of work on vari- 

instructive to prospective teachers. ons pieces of apparatus. The work 

The Xew Castle dance by of the third year boys particularly 

Sharpe was presented by a group was received most enthusiastically 

of Seniors, under the direction of by the observers. 

Miss Herzog. as the third number A Junior number. Elements of 

on the program. Athletic Activities under the 

The plays and games given by instruction of Miss Horner pre- 

the Juniors, carried the audience ceeded the most beautiful attrac- 

back to childhood days, and the tion of the evening. Springtime 

little do? w!ui_^lanehed received in Hellas, a costume dance given 

many a sympathetic smile from the by health education students and 

onlookers. Miss Ord was the music supervisors presented a 

leader of this number. colorful and effective picture which 

A squad practice was given next wii l not ))e f or jj 0tt en soon. The 

under the leadership of Miss eV ent, under the direction of Miss 

Graeffly, after which a Polish dance Herzog was the concluding number 

was presented by Senior classes ()n t ] u . p r0 g ra m. 
under the direction of Miss Horner. TIl( . fl ora] tributes presented by 

The first year health education x)r. Rliss to the Misses Horner, 

students, delighted and amused Herzog and Hollobaugh. were but 

their audience by an extremely :1 snia i] u ^Vcn of the appreciation 

clever Scarecrow Dance, the renlly felt by the sntdents. 
costumes of which alone would 
cause a great deal of merriment. 



138 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



19 MARCH 1927 



NORMAL "GYM'^HQVn 

TOuft ffejbptoUDo Splendid Work in 
/ DHIU/Marcliea and Games. 

Physical Director Presents Flowers 

to Assistants, Praising Theru for 

Loyally and Ability. 

B. T. Barnum's "Celebrated and 
Greatest Show on Earth" was out- 
rivaled and eclipsed last evening, in 
the gymnasium of the West Chester 
State Normal School, in the annual 
demonstration of the activities of 
the Health Education Department 
of the Normal School, under the di- 
rection of James G. Bliss, Ph. D., 
Dliector of Health Education, ably 
assisted by Miss A. Irene Horner, B. 
S.. Miss Gertrude Herzog, B. S., Miss 
Mildred Hollobaugh, A. B., of the 
same department, and J. F. McGov- 
crn. Ph. B., athletic_coach. 

It won the praise and plaudits of 
the 1500 students and invited guests 
who rilled the seats reserved on a 
portion of the main floor and the 
chairs in the balcony. 

At times there were ten rings of 
performers In activity, that evoked 
repeated applause so well earned 
and deserved. 

The program was opened with 
Figure Marching, by 6lxty-f<Xir girls 
of the Junior Class, attired in white 
blouses and shoes, black bloomers 
and stockings, and red ties. The in- 
structor was Miss Horner, and the 
leader was Miss Sara Emerick, of 
Mlfflintown, Pa. 

SCHOOLROOM GYMNASTICS. 

The 166 Junior girls, instructed 
by Miss Horner, with Miss Margaret 
E. Calderhead, of Philadelphia, as 
their leader, marched Into the gym- 
nasium, and sat upon the floor 
cross-legged, forming a pretty pic- 
ture. Then they demonstrated vari- 
ous form's of light gymnastics, with 
the use of basket balls, setting up 
Indian clubs in "charmed" circles, 
etc., followed by several movements 
of the body, arms and legs, to loos- 
en up creaking joints. 

SENIORS DANCE. 

A bunch of ninety-six active girls 
of the Senior Class, under instruc- 
tion of Miss Herzog, and wearing 
black ties, in addition to adopted 
costume of tho other classes, enter- 
t.i'ned with, a charming dance 
' Newcastle" (English) by Shavpe. 
PLAYS 'AND GAMES. 

Junior Class girls, to the number 
of 120, Instructed by Miss Horner, 
and with Miss Katherine S. Ord, of 
Carlisle, as their leader, contributed 
one of the pleasing features of the 
evening, in series of pleasing nur- 
sery rhymes and singing games— 
"The cat jumped over the moon 
"Four and twenty blackbirds baked 
In a pie," "Hickory, Hickory, Dock 
f tc, followed by several playground 
games, and Btunts-"Ever see a 
Lassie go this way and that way? 



SQUAD PRACTICE. 

Under the Instruction of Miss Her- 
zog, nlrtety-alx senior girls, with Miss 
Helen Graeff, of llarrisburg, as lead- 
er, participated in a demonstration 
of movements on the climbing ropes, 
parallel bars und other apparatus. 
THE SCAR DANCE. 

A Polish Dance (Goralski Taniec), 
directed by Miss Horner, was charm- 
ingly given by forty-eight lively' and 
■graceful girls of the senior class, and 
then followed the character dance 
(scarecrow), by thirty young women 
and young men of the first year 
group of the Health Education Class, 
instructed by Miss Herzog, teaching 
the Interpretation of a given charac- 
ter, and to lead on to intense recrea- 
tive Interest. 

FLOOR STUNTS. 

About seventy or so senior girls, 
in groups, under leadership of Miss 
Jean Morrison, of Sewickley, Pa., 
won continuous applaue as they per- 
formed in somersaults and other ac- 
tivities on the floor, and formed ar- 
tistic and beautiful pyramids and 
group postures, some requiring 
strength, nerve and ability, and cour- 
age. Then followed a series of ac- 
tivities by a class of more than for- 
ty of the professional students on 
the appaatus.who gave varied move- 
ments In balancing, rope ^fcnbing, 
etc. 

YOUNG MEN ON DECK. 

In command of Ralph McCorkle, 
former West Chester High School 
athlete, two dozen young men of the 
gym. class entertained the large 
gathering of spectators with a num- 
ber of thrilling stunts, including cart- 
wheels, head-stands, handsprings, 
spring-board vaulting and tumbling 
and high diving, interspersed with 
movements on the horse, mats and 
bars. The premier high diver was 
Michael Bales, who won rounds of 
applause. 

Some athletic activities, to develop 
a knowledge of and a skill in the 
fundamental movements of the, track 
and field activities and' athletic 
teams, were given by 120 junior 
girls, who gave portrayal of a base 
ball game, broad jump, shot-put, 
high jump, sprinting, etc. 

FLOWERS PRESENTED. 
Then Dr. Bliss, accompanied by 
a trio of "little flower girls," went 
into the centre £f the gymnasium, 
and in a neat little speech presented 
large baskets of beautiful flowers 
to Misses Herzog, Horner and Hol- 
lbbaugh. Dr. Bliss said: "The last 
number on the program is about to 
be presented, but before it makes 
its appearance and we say 'adieu,' 
it seems proper and fitting to place 
credit where credit is due. This is 
my mission now." He then called 
onto the floor Miss Horner, Miss 
Herzog and Miss Hollobaugh, and 
to them said: "I have long recog- 
nized your capabilities as real lead- 
ers in the field of Health Education, 
and you have proven here that you 



are worthy of such titles as educa- 
tors, scholars, students, ladies, 
and last but not least, I assure you, 
real leaders of young men and 
young women. In token of your sin- 
cerity, loyalty, Intellectual ability 
and scholarship, which is clearly 
recognized by the stndents of this 
great institution of learning, I have 
the honor to convey this message 
of love and good fellowship to you 
from them. I am further instructed 
by them to reinforce this friendly 
message with these friendly tokens. 
I congratulate you most heartily." 
(Applause). Dr. Bliss then present- 
ed the flowers to the young ladies 
named. 

THE FINAL DANCE. 
"Springtime In Hellas," was the 
title of a pretty and charming dance 
by thirty girls of the Health Edu- 
cation Class and the Music Super- 
visors, who were attired in gown.4 
of bright and varied colors. This 
dance aimed to develop natural 
movements as running, leaping, 
skipping, etc. 

DIRECTIONS GIVEN FOR 
ATTENDING MOVIES 

Girls Need Different Tickets 

From Men 
Each girl living in the hull will sign 
out in the following manner: 

1. Sign name on hall slip before 6PM 

March 19. 

(The hall slips will be put upon 
the respective halls after 8 P. M 
March 18.) 

2. Give the stub of your ticket to your 

councilor anytime before 6. P." M. 
March 19th. 

(a) This stub is attached to the 
part of your ticket which admits 
you to the Opera House. Girls 
must purchase these tickets with 
green stubs. Men, faculty and 
friends purchase the ticket with- 
out a stub. 

Your name must be filled in on 
the blank provided on this stub. 
Your councilor puts her initials on 
the stub and turns it in to the 
office. The stubs must check with 
the hall slips. 

3. Sign in, on hall slip when you re- 

turn before 9.9o"P^"Al. The hall 
slips will be taken down at this 
hour by the councilor. 

Girls' tickets can be purchased at any 
ing for room and board, buy tickets with 
green stubs, fill in name and give to 
house mother before 6 P. M., March 19. 
Your house mother signs and returns it, 
as she does all special permissions. 

The price of the ticket is forty cents. 
No tickets will be sold to women stu- 
dents at the Opera House. The terms 
are positively cash, as this show is no 
exception from the regular shows where 
one can not "charge" admittance. 

As has been suggested before, future 
permissions of a similar nature depend 
on the conduct of the girls on this oc- 
casion. Sign out, give the stub to your 
councilor or house mother, and sign in 
before 9.50 P. M..' 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 139 



March 7, 1928 GREEN STONE 
HEATLH EDUCATION 
EXHIBITION PLANNED 



ANNUAL HEALTH EDUCATION 

DEMONSTRATION TO BE HELD THURSDAY 



Mr. Waters is Coach 

The annual exhibition given by the 
Health Kilucatliin students and spon- 
sored hv Dr. Bliss will be given on 
March :in. 

Practice has been going on steadily 
anil tlie students are being put into shape 
by Mr. Waters. 

Only three pieces of apparatus will be 
used in the exhibition; the mats, riving 
rings, and high liar. Mr. Walters, who 
is proficient on the apparatus, is an ex- 
cellent instructor and an inspiration to 
his pupils. 

Michael Bales, who was an outstanding 
figure in the last exhibition, is again 
entered this year. 

The admission is free; the hour, after 
eight; the attraction, interest. 

The elimination tryouts for the men's 
apparatus exhibition to be held on the 
twenty-ninth of this month, was staged 
last Thursday night in the gymnasium 
under the critical eve of Professor 
Waters. 

24 MARCH 1928 

ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION 
IN COLLEGE GYM 

Students of Both Sexes Will Appear 

in Extended Program of Varied 

Activities in Education. 

The annual demonstration of ac- 
tivities in Health Education by the 
students of the State Teachers Col- 
lege, this borough, will be held in the 
college gymnasium, next week, with 
an extended program of varied ex- 
ercises, under supervision of Dr. 
James G. Bliss, the Director of Hy- 
gience and Health Education at the 
College, assisted by Miss Alice C. 
Schriever, Miss Eleanor Searing, 
Mrs. Dorothy Kemington, Miss Va- 
nessa Glenn and Prof. "Waters, In- 
structors in the Health Education 
Department. 

The program will include school- 
room gymnastics and inarching, by 
the second-year Academics; folk 
dances, by Academic Freshies; com- 
bative exercises, including boxing, 
wrestling, fencing, etc., by Health 
Education Freshies; plays and 
games, by Academic Freshies; varied 
movements on the buck horse, box, 
parallel bars, spring-board, traveling 
rings, etc., by the Health-Eds., un- 
der direction of Misses Schriver and 
Scaring; dances, by Health-Ed. 
Seniors; stun,ts, Junior High and 
Music Supervisors' classes; pyramids, 
Second-Year Academics, corrective 
gymnastics, by groups; dances, Sec- 
ond-Year Academics, directed by 
Miss Schriver; advanced apparatus 
work, by boys' of Health-Ed. Class, 
including flj'ing rings, mats, hori- 
zontal bar, etc., directed* by Prof. 
Waters. 



All Classes Take Part 

Health Education comes to the front 
on Thursday evening, March 29 at 7:30 
P. M., when the Annual Demonstration 
of the Activity Program in Health Ed- 
ucation will be given. Both the Health 
Education and Academic Students are 
working hard, with the aid of the in- 
structors, to make this the best program 
of its kind ever given in this institution. 
The admission to outsiders will be 35 
cents. 

The program consists of the following 
numbers : 

1. School Room Gymnastics 

2nd Year Academics 
Instructor — Mrs. Remington 

2. Marching .... 2nd Year Academics 

Instructor — Miss Schriver 

3. Folk Dance.... 1st Year Academics 

"Pop Goes the Weasel" 
Instructor — Miss Searing 
4. Combative Activities 

1st Year H. E. Major 
Boxing 
Wrestling 

Cane and Foil Fencing 
Instructor — Mr. Waters 
5. Plays and Games 

1st Year Academics 
Play Room Activities 
Playground Activities 
Instructor — Miss Searing 



6. Apparatus (Girls) 

lst^2nd, 3rd Year H. E. Majors 
Box Parallel Bars 

Buck Spring Board High Jump 
Horse Traveling Rings 
Instructors — Searing and Schriver 

7. Dances 2nd Year Academics 

"Vcrsoiivicnne" 
"Horse and Driver" 
Instructor — Miss Schriver 

8. Stunts 

1st, 2nd Year Jr. Highs and Music 
Instructor — Miss Searing 

9. Pyramid Building 

2nd Year Academics 
Instructor — Miss Schriver 

10. Dances... 3rd Year H. E. Majors 

"I.indy Leu" Gymnastic and Clog 

Dance 
"Grotesque" Character Dance 
Instructor — Miss Glenn 

11. Individual Corrective Gymnastic 

Restricted Activity Group 
Flat Foot 
Relaxing Exercises 
Round Shoulder and Flat Chest 
Hollow Back 
Instructor — Mrs. Remington 

12. Advanced Apparatus (Boys) 

2nd, 3rd H. E. Majors 
Horizontal Bar 
Flying Rings 
Mats 

Instructor — Mr. Waters 




Normal Orchestra 



140 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



1 he Heritage January is, 1928 Philips Memorial 

FOREWORD 

This Pageant has been a co-operative project. It was written 
by the "Pageant Class," (Physical Education Department.) 
We are indebted to the faculty members of the Music, Science, 7 MARCH 1928 

Rural Education and Health Education for their co-operation, 

and to the Poster Club for the posters. « r i* r* i nrvt r* 

Y. M. C. A. HOLD 

(IXCERPJS) ANNUAL GYM 

Scene IV— The Cavaliers EXHIBITION 

Cast: Dancers D.Stevenson J.Crawford 

College Men Witness Performance 

R. Lauback L.Atkinson , „ TT ... _, 

A small group of Health Ed gymnas- 

M. Curran A. Bowdle tic enthusiasts headed by Professor 

Waters, witnessed the Annual Gym Ex- 
H. Airey M, Guido liibition, given under the auspices of the 

West Chester Y. M. C. A. last Wednes- 
V day evening. 

The activities indulged in involved all 
bPiRlT OF Health Education— Mary Vance classes of the organization from the 

Scene I-Greek Statues J Va " d D ' iU ^ iv ? n b * ni " e - ve /' r okl f boys ' 

to the advanced apparatus class or men. 

R. Kelly, J. Aikens, R. Bradley, B. Cunningham The exhibition was staged before a 

o tt A/t i- • large gallery, and between events a seven 

bcene H— Monasticism rieoe orellC s tra of bovs entertained. 

Monk P. Garthwaite The program consisted of wand drills, 

T,, ALLT-jAjtnni porpoise rolling;, tumbling clowns, Indian 

feasants Ashburn, Tweed, Malloy, Ramaley ,.,„,, swi „„j np , flasn i; K | lt drills, appar- 

Scene III— Knights C. Cox and B. Cunningham atus work > contortions, tumbling, wrest- 

ling, pyramids and bell drills. 
Scene IV — Scholasticsm The big event of the evening was the 

Student H. Siller contortions enacted by Allen Mason. 

He twisted himself into everything from 
Scene V — German Formal Gymnastics airedale scratch to the crawling spider. 

r, , . .. _ „ _. _ , . _ . , , _ It would seem that he is the Lon Chaney 

.Dales, Aikens, lieliy, Clauser, Deakins, Smith and Porter f j ne E as t 

Scene VI— Playground Festival T * e "«shiight drill given in the dark- 

ened gymnasium presented a weird ef- 

Ace of Diamonds Misses Hunter fect and th e Indian club swinging of 

r> i Christian Sanderson was a feature of the 

evening. 

Blowing Bubbles Blenkin Tbe ^ hi ^ iion w * s , coa £ h n e . d " n< l spon- 

sored by Raymond A. Elliot, physical 
Burns director of the Y. M. C. A. 

Gehr 

Haslam 
Home 

Waltz Study Misses Brown 

Speed 
Valentine 

Mountain March Roddy 

Clendenin 
Pritchard 

Oxdanscn (Parody on Boxing) 

Cast: Freshman students in Health Education 
Kamarinskaia — Freshman students in Health Education 

HEALTH EDUCATION PAGEANT, JANUARY 18 
What a wonderful experience- to have the whole process and evolution of Education 
pass before one's eyes in less than two hours' time. This pageant. "The Heritage," showed 
also the contributions of Art and Music from every known source. The whole program 
was a truly educational as well as delightful one. 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 141 




NORMAN W. CAMERON 

A.M., Ph.D. 

Athlete - Teacher - Coach 
Administrator - President 

1928-1935 



Dr. Norman W. Cameron was born at Zion, Maryland, 
September 27, 1876. He graduated "magna cum laude" from 
Washington College, Chestertown, Maryland in 1895. Two 
years later he received his A.M. degree from the same college. 
His teaching experiences were extensive, including that of 
Superintendent of Schools, Blacksburg, South Carolina 
1898-1901; teacher and administrator, Philippine Islands 
1901-1904; Supervising Principal, Lewes, Delaware 1905-07; 



and Supervising Principal, Elkton, Maryland 1907-09. He came 
to West Chester Normal School as Head of the Department of 
Psychology and Education in 1909, and in 1913 he accepted 
an appointment for a similar position at Western State 
Teacher's College, Kalamazoo, Michigan. He received his Ph.D. 
degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1912. From 
1916 to 1924 he was Director of Teacher Training and 
Principal of the City Normal School, Baltimore, Maryland. 
From 1924 to 1926 he was Superintendent of Schools in 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania and of Chester, Pennsylvania from 
1926-28. He was appointed President of West Chester in 1928, 
serving in this capacity until 1 935 . 

Dr. Cameron was actively associated with a number of 
professional organizations and service groups including the 
Pennsylvania State Y.M.C.A., West Chester Board of Trade, 
National Education Association, Progressive Education 
Association, National Society for the Study of Education, 
Academy of Political and Social Science, Pennsylvania 
Academy of Science, Pennsylvania State Education Associa- 
tion, and Chester County Historical Society. He also was active 
in the Methodist Church and in the Masonic Order. Following 
his term as President of the college he served as 
Superintendent of Schools in Garfield, New Jersey. Dr. 
Cameron died in November, 1947. 




Dr. Cameron Baseball Coach 1910 



142 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
West Chester, Pa. 

ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE 

ACTIVITY PROGRAM 

IN 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

8.00 Friday Evening - - - March 15, 1929 

PROGRAM 



16 MARCH 1929 



i. TACTICS and FIGURE MARCHING 

Instructor, Miss Schriver 



Freshmen 



2. GYMNASTIC EXERCISES - Juniors and Seniors 

Instructor, Miss Searing 



3. PYRAMIDS 



Instructor, Miss Mueller 



4. CLOG DANCES 



"Dixie" "Old Plantation' 

Instructor, Miss Wade 



5. MIMETICS 



Sophomores 



Juniors 



Freshmen 



Instructor, Miss Schriver 

G. APPARATUS ----- Juniors and Seniors 

Ropes Box 

Parallel Pars 

Instructor, Miss Searing 



7. CYMNASTTC. DANCE 

Instructor, Mr. Waters 



ErM^hm^u 



3. MASS INSTRUCTION IN ATHLETICS - - Sophomores 
Hocky — Leader, Catherine Rhodes '29 
Track Events — Leader, Evelyn Hursh '29 
Field Events— Leader, Bernice Sundel '29 
Tennis— Leader, Margaret Henning '29 
Instructor, Miss SCHRIVEK 

9. ADVANCED APPARATUS - - Juniors and Seniors 

Horse Parallel Bars 

Instructor, Mr. Waters 



10. ATHLETIC DANCES 

"Arkansas Travelers" "Topsy" 

Instructor, Miss Wade 



11. STUNTS 



Instructor, Miss Schriver 



12. INDIAN CLUBS 



Instructor, Mr. Bliss 



13. NATURAL DANCING 

Instructor, Miss Wade 

14. PLAYS AND GAMES 

Instructor, Miss Mueller 

15. INDIVIDUAL CORRECTIVE GYMNASTICS 

Instructor, Miss Wade 

16. MASS TUMBLING - 

Instructor, Mr. Waters 



Juniors 



Freshmen 



SelectpH 



Freshmen 



Sophomores 



Juniors 



All the Boys 



College Health Education Department 
Entertains Large Audience. 

Pretty, Drills and\ Thrilling Gym- 
nastic Work Pluase Spectators, 
Who Are 'J luMlcri by Dar- 
in;; Stunts uf Platform. 

The annual demonstration of the 
activity program 



inonstration of the 
c(£ the Health Edu- 
cation Department of the' Pennsyl- 
vania Teachers College, this place, 
an affair that foif many years past, 
inaugurated in tfce days when Dr. 
and Mrs. C. M. if.hinger were direc- 
tors of physical education at the in- 
stitution, has evef been one of the 
big features in tine school life, was 
held last evening iwhen for three 
[hours was entertanned a gathering 
iOf students and invjited guests that 
ithronged the spacious Philips Me- 
■morial Chapel to the? doors, the large 
'assembly greatly enjoying and ap- 
preciated the splendid work of the 
,many well-trained students who 
.participated in the sixteen numbers 
ion the program. 

Heretofore the demonstrations 
have been held in the chapel, but 
with so much better seating accom- 
modation in the Plilips Memorial 
Chapel, it was decided to hold this 
year's "hig show" there, and every- 
thing passed off mqst successfully 
and delightfully. , 

The young women, and the few 
young men who tool, part in the 
several events, displayed remarkable 
ability and training, and were ac- 
corded rounds of well-deserved and 
merited applause. 

Dr. James U. Bliss, bead of the 
department, and his assistants, Miss 
Schriver, Miss Searing. Miss Wade, 
Miss Mueller and Prof. Waters, were 
warmly congratulated on the suc- 
cess of the demonstration, \yhile the 
students participating were com- 
plimented upon their proficiency 
and skill. 

EARLY EVENTS. 
The program was opened shortly 
after eight o'clock by a class of two 
dozen girls selected from the Fresh- 
men class, who entertained with a 
series of figure marching, etc., un- 
der direction of Miss Schriver, won 
applause as the execution varied 
movements, a la West Point cadets. 
These girls concluded their feats 
with formation In groups of the let- 
ters "W" and "C." 

Then followed varied gymnastic 
exercises by seventeen girls of the 
Junior and Senior classes, directed 
by Miss Searing, after which twen- 
ty-six girls of the Freshmen class, 
with Miss Schriver as instructor, 
contributed a series of mimetics, in- 
troducing bowling, the shotput. 
swimming, boxing, base boll and 
other sport activities. 

Then fifteen pretty girls appeared 
in a clog-dance, "Dixie," winning 
a big measure of applause for their 
proficiency, and were followed by a 
group of ten young men who gave 
the "Old Plantation" dance, but the 
honors went to the maidens. 
CIRCUS PARADE. 
Under the instruction of Miss 
Mueller, nineteen active and acro- 
batic girls of the Sophomore class 
won repeated applause in their 
series of attractive pyramids, con- 
cluding their turn -with a laughable 
"circus parade." 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 143 



STUDENTS DISPLAY MUSCLE AND SKILL (cont.nued) 



Twenty agile girls of the Junior 
and Senior classes, under the in- 
struction of Miss Searing, entertain- 
ed the large audience with numer- 
ous feats upon the ropes, box and 
parallel bars, and introducing some 
tumbling feats that were decidedly 
pleasing to the spectators. 

Mr. Waters directed a class of '_en 
young men In a pleasing gymnastic 
dance in which the performers exe- 
cuted some lively cart-wheels. 

VAIUED FIELD SPORTS. 
. Classes of ten girls representing 
the sophomore class, illustrated vari- 
ed movements in the training for 
several outdoor sports — field hockey, 
with Catherine" Rhodes, leader: 
track events. Evelyn Hursh, leader; 
field events, B§rnice Sundel, leader; 
tennis, Margaret Henning, leader. 
These girls illustrated the rudiment 
of handling the hockey stick the ten- 
nis racquet, and the first principles 
of starting in races and in the vari- 
ed jumps. 

These were followed by an im- 
promptu diversion by Joseph George 
and Ed. Hopkins that amused the 
audience. 

MORE THRILLS. 

Fourteen young men of the junior 
and the senior classes gave an exhi- 
bition on the horse and the parallel 
bars that gave thrills to the onlook- 
ers as the gymnasts performed mar- 
velous stunts requiring skill and 
nerve. This bunch deserved the lib- 
eral applause that greeted their 
work. 

ATHLETIC DANCES. 

Six 'girls gaily attired and six 
young men participated in a dance. 
"The Arkansas Travelers," and won 
applause, but the burlesque dance, 
"Topsy," by another group of girlj 
in nondescript attire and with many 
grotesque movements evoked thun- 
ders of applause. The audience 
seemed to be "tickled" with this in- 
novation. 

MORE STUNTS. 

Twenty-four girls of the freshmen 
class, under instruction of Miss 
Schriver made a big hit in presenta- 
tion of a long list of varied stunts 
that were greatly enjoyed by the 
crowd; introducing the crane dive, 
crawling through the stick, jumping 
the stick, the tail-spin, the greetings, 
stomach balance, sitting balance, 
handstand on knees, carrying act, 
the pedestals, archway, treadway, 
leap frog, and concluding with tht 
great and wonderful animile race of 
the crabs, centipedes, crickets, 
ducks, the wonderful crowirig roost- 
er, frogs, seals, camels, and the mar- 
velous prehistoric creatures. Con- 
cluding with a number of musical 
stunts, with the merry-go-round, 
and the formation of the living let- 
ters — W. C. S. T. C. Thunders of 
applause greeted this demonstration. 
FLAMING TORCHES. 

tone of the features of the show 
was the spectacular exhibition of 
Indian Club swinging by group of 
eight selected young men, under in- 
struction of Dr. Bliss. These per- 
formers were equipped with flam- 
ing torches with which they executed 
many intricate movements that elic- 
ited repeated applause from the de- 
lighted onlookers. 



NATURE DANCING. 
Fourteen girls of the freshmen 
class, with Miss YVade as the instruc- 
tor, delighted the audience with 
many dances and poses, to music on 
the pipe organ. These girls wer« 
bare-legged, some with abbreviated 
skirts and others with skirts of var- 
ied colored diaphanous materials. 
They disported in varied postures 
and evoked rounds of applause a.-,i 
they nibly cavorted about the stage 
In the execution of their dances. 
PLAYS AND GAMES. 
This affair was a rip-snorter and 
replete with activity and fun. a* 
twenty girls of the sophomore class 
arrayed in overalls, rompers and 
similar drygoods, had jolly time un- 
der instruction of Miss Mueller, in 
presenting a number of lively games 
— straight line, bluebird, the thread 
follows the needle, pirates, farmer in 
the dell, human ten-pins, swat the 
kaiser, human hurdles, etc. This 
proved a big ovation. 

It was 11 o'clock, "-Jien about 411 
young men participated in- a series 
of mass tumbling in which thev disj 
played wonderful training 

PURPLE AND GOLD 
MARCH 1929 

HEALTH EDUCATION 
DEMONSTRATION 

The annual demonstration of the activity 
program in Health Education was held in 
the Philips Memorial on the evening of 
March 15, 192°. Contrary to the custom 
of several years standing, the Academic 
pupils did not participate in this demon- 
stration. 

The exhibition itself was very colorful. 
In the clog dances, nature dancing demon- 
stration and in several other numbers the 
students participating were dressed in 
costumes befitting the particular activity. 
For the other numbers the students were 
attired in their Health Education costumes. 

The program was as follows: 

I. Tactics and figure marching which 
was demonstrated by the Freshmen girls. 
This number ended with the formation of 
the letters, "W. C." 

II. Gymnastic exercises by the Juniors 
and Seniors which contained numerous 
rhythmic exercises. 

III. The pyramid building of the Soph- 
omores explains itself and was very well 
done. 

IV. The clog dances given were "Dixie" 
and "Old Plantation," the former done by 
girls of the Junior class and the latter done 
by the boys of the same class. 

V. Mimetics. In this number such ac- 
tivities as boxing, bowling, diving, swim- 
ming, rowing, etc., were demonstrated by 
the Freshmen group. 



VI. Apparatus work on the Swedish 
box and the ropes was demonstrated by 
the Junior and Senior women. 

VII. Gymnastic dance done by the 
Freshmen men. 

VIII. In the "mass instruction in 
athletics," the fourth year health education 
girls led. Catherine Rhodes was the 'leader 
of hockey. Instruction in the correct way 
to hold a hockey stick for the various 
strokes was given. 

Evelyn Hursh taught the track drill, 
which included instruction in the start, 
the passing of the baton, and correct 
running form. 

Berenice Sundel taught the various field 
events; broad jumping, both standing and 
running, and the high jump. 

Margaret Henning was the leader for 
tennis. As in hockey, the various strokes 
were taught as well as the other funda- 
mentals of the game. 

IX. Advanced apparatus work done by 
the Junior and Senior men. This number 
contained exercises on the parallel bars 
and on the horse. 

X. "Arkansas Traveler," and "Topsy," 
were the two athletic dances done by the 
Junior class. 

XI. The program of stunts offered was 
very spectacular. Such "stunts" as "Jack- 
in-the-box," stomach balance, sitting bal- 
ance, carrying the wounded, archway, 
treadway, animal parade, merry-go-round 
and ring-around-the-rosy were depicted. 
These activities were presented by the 
Freshmen girls. 

XII. The Indian club drill was done in 
a rather unusual manner. The auditorium 
anil stage were dark, while the ends of the 
whirling Indian dumb-bells had been pro- 
vided with lighted torches, making the 
drill very effective-looking to the audience. 

VIII. In the natural dancing number 
by the Freshmen girls, several dances were 
demonstrated with characteristic actions. 
Several "Greek freizes" were depicted also. 

XIV. The Sophomore girls enacted a 
playground instruction period. Julia Landis 
led in the group in this particular activity. 
Such games as "Thread follows the needle," 
"Swat the kaiser," and "Human hurdle," 
were played. 

XV. The mass tumbling was a very 
effective demonstration done by all the 
boys in the Health Education Department. 



144 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
WEST CHESTER. PENNA. 

DANCE RECITAL 

GIVEN BY 
CLASSES IN DANCING 

JANUARY 24. 1930 



20 FEBRUARY 1930 



8.0D P. M. 



PROGRAM 
FREE RHYTHMS 

Stud y Salisbury 

Faust Waltz Gounod 

CHILD RHYTHMS 

Steps 

Little Miss Muffet 

Raggedy Ann 

See Saw . . . . 



Naydn 

■irrangemen 

Wilson 

■ Marion 

My Shadow Chavagnat 

Statues Old English May Pole Dance 

Simple Simom Smtlh 

DANCE PATTERNS 

Pan and the Hamadryads Arrangement 

Study with Balloons Dvorak 

FunatSea Arrangement 

The Fountain .... . ... Godard and Arrangement 

The Refugees Schubert 

WaltzStudy Schubert 

FINALE Fanfare 



25 JANUARY 1930 



COLLEGE DANCE 

PROGRAM ATTRACTIVE 

Instructors in Health 'Education De- 
partment Coach Girls Who Show 
Ability in This Line. 

Students at the State Teachers Col- 
lege were delightfully entertained 
last evening by a program put on In" 
the Philips Memorial Chapel by 85 
girls who during the past semester 
have been under the instruction olF 
Miss Myra I. Wade, Miss Anna Marie 
Shctub, Miss Gladys Bowen and Miss 
Bernice L. Bueller, instructors In the 
Health Education Department. The 
program was made up of rhythmic 
dances and was skillfully executed 
by the students. 

Three parts of the program in- 
cluded free rhythm, child rhythm 
dances and dance patterns, the sec- 
ond part consisting of such dances-'as 
Simple Simon, Raggedy Ann' and 
Little Miss Muffet. Features of the 
progam included clog and baloon 
dances. As a finale a waltz study was 
6«.e»i. A numoer of the dances were 
originated by the • students them- 
selves. 

Miss Edith Holmah presided at the 
piano during the. evening, while -Miss 
Lillian Keener presided as -organist. 



GIRLS PERFORM 
".NIGHT. AT THE CIRCUS" 

Meeting of W. A. A. at the State 
Teachers College. 



Bis Bunch of Jolly Young Women 
Enjoys Merry Hour in the Gym- 
nasium — Jnggling, Tumbl- 
ing and Elephant Rid- 
ing Givo Thrills. 
The regular monthly meeting *f 
the Women's Athletic Association of 
the Pennsylvania State Teachers 
College, this place, was held last 
evening in the big gymnasium at fh« 
college, with Miss Julia S. Landis, of 
Ambler. Montgomery county, the ef- 
ficient and popular President, oc- 
cupying the big chair and directlnf 
the affairs in a most creditable man- 
ner, while the Secretary, Miss AnlU 
M. Gualco, of Allentown, jotted down 
the proceedings. 

This Association was recently or- 
ganized and sponsored by Miss Anna 
Marie Shaube and Miss Bernice L. 
Mueller, instructors in the Health 
Education Department of- the Col- 
lege, and is to foster ideals of good 
sportsmanship, to increase partici- 
pation in all sports, and to develop 
leadership and the initiative 
throughout the student-body. :.. , 

Following the transaction of the 
preliminary business, Miss Ethel 
Brietinger, of Wyomissing, Ber^s 
county, the treasurer, made report 
on the financial condition of the As- 
sociation, and then Miss Mueller' 
spoke of a number of the activities 
of the association, and spoke of ttf- 
eral of the future plans for Increas- 
ing interest and pleasures of the 
membership. 

Other business, deferred and new 
received proper attention, and -then 
President Landis appointed several 
committees, as follows: 

To prepare official song for the 
association — Miss Dorothy M. 
Hauck, of Noffsvllle; Miss Ruth 
Walker, Bristol, Pa., and Miss liary 
Curran, of Mercersburg. 

Committee to Obtain Awards- 
Miss Mildred R. Terhune, Easton;. 
Miss Josepehlne Hendrickson. ■'"-•■, 
Committee to Plan Entertainment 
Programs — Miss Ceola Anderson, of 
Bath, Pa.; Miss Dorothy Stevenson, j! 
Lancaster; Miss Delia S. Leech, of 
Philadelphia; Miss Alice Erb, Har- 
risburg. 

These committees will make re- 
port at the next business meeting of 
the Association. 

THE BIG CIRCUS. 
Following the business, session, 
then came a great, big merry time at" 
"The Circus," -with Miss Breitlnger! 
at the ticket wagon, dispensing the 
passes and collecting the' lucre. 
This wonderful entertainment was 
prepared and dramatized by ifjss 
Sue Goldberg, of Brldgeton, N. ,J„ a 
bright -student .of the.'" second-jear 
class' of the Health'" Education De> 



IJ&rtment. Under the direction of 
Miss Goldberg, who officiated as the 
ringmaster, the eighty or so jojly 
girls arranged themselves into four 
groups, and, in the circus parade, 
imitated numerous animals — beari, 
elephants, horses, a centipede more 
than twenty feet in length, etc. 

Many of the girls were attired in 
nondescript outfits, some -wore over- 
alls, some were barelegged,- others 
were attired in grotesque, and mlrth- 
provpking raiment, and all but for a 
big time at the circus. .* 

After a lively exhibition of tum- 
bling, diving and other . perform- 
ances on the^ mats, Miss .Ruth A. 
White, of Greenlane,' Pa,,, lavishly 
attired, thrilled the assemblage with 
her, hair-raising gyrations -in her 
tight-rope performance, and was ac'-' 
corded salvos of vociferous huzzas. 

Miss Mildred Terhune, o^ Easton, 
astonished the crowd of onlookers 
in her marvelous . wand-swallowing 
act. 

Then Miss Jo. Hendrickson mysti- 
fied the audience with wonderful act 
of juggling various articles, and was 
followed by the tumbling dogs-^— 
Ruth Anderson and Madeline How- 
Iett. i 

Miss Dorothy Stevenson,' as the 
strong man, handled huge weights 
In an astounding way that evoked 
rounds of applause. 

One of the real lively acts was the 
appearance of the bucking broncho 
(Miss Mary Miller), who unseated 
the rider. Miss Ruth Lincoln, amid 
considerable merriment. 

Then Miss Anita Gualco pulled off 
a stunt, in which she called upon 
several girls to illustrate various ob- 
jects — a table, pair of chairs, clock, 
fireplace, rug, floor lamp, etc, . and 
then after they were arranged la 
various positions, the affair was: la- 
beled, "Gathering of Nuts."' Lla, 
ha. " / 

Then '.'Miss Liberty" appeared in 
the ring seated on "the top of; 'the 
largest elephant, in captivity,' and 
Miss Delia Leech gave an exhibition 
of development of muscles due to 
her thorough training at the West 
Chester College^ She readily broke 
a big bar of iron (?) with her (teeth, 
and entertained with other feats 
(not feet). 

Miss Louise Kent performed. ~6n 
the horizontal bar and "skinned the 
cat," etc., and then Miss Fifl Fox did 
some cartwheels, and similar physi- 
cal activities. 

A merry affair was a hilarious af- 
fair, "Going Around the Circus 
Tent," In which the, bunch of laugh- 
ing maidens were led by Miss Helen 
Gordon, Barnesboro^ Pa., and they 
sure did have one big time In sing- 
ing and dancing all sorts of Iudi- 
orotiB movomontH,' roaring like the 
Uoijh, grunting llko the elephant^ 
Imitating V e climbing of the mon- 
keys, etc. 

Then followed informal dance'.to 
music on the piano, by Miss Ruth 
Bauer, and the circus was proclaim- 
ed a big social success. 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 145 



15 MARCH 1930 



%LKYRIE CLUB 

STAGES REVUE 

College Audience Is Entertained by 
Health Education Students. 



Original Dances and Acts Are Put on 
by Young People Who Appear 
in Costumes of Many Col- 
ors and Designs. 

The Valkyrie Club was the chief 
attraction at the State Teachers 
College on Saturday evening, when 
the members of that organization 
sponsored last year by the Junior 
Health Education girls staged a 
colorful revue In the Philips Me- 
morial Chapel. The revue was given 
to show the original talent in the 
Health Education group. Most of the 
dances were original with the stu- 
dents and were directed by mem- 
bers of the Club, of which Miss Ber- 
nice L. Mueller is advisor. They were 
well executed and were heartily ap- 
plauded by the audience. 

Robert (Bob) Kelly was Master 
of Ceremonies and kept the audience 
in a good humor between the acts. 
The Hoosler Hop featured the 
opening of the revue, with the junior 
and sophomore Health Eds taking 
part. Dressed in sweaters and skirts 
of flashy colors the following girls 
won a big applause: Elizabeth Ely, 
Pauline Bauer, Vera Gilbert, Ruth 
Lincoln, Mildred Miller, Alice Ives, 
Lois Diffenbacker, Martha Henry, 
Dora Fulmer, Mary Miller," Martha 
Cooper, Myra Wilson. Kathryn 
Kuhns. Sue Yeager, Myrtle Potteig- 
er, Julia Landis, Betty Shaw, Verna 
Dotter, Lovenia Miller, Mercy Smith 
and Dorothy Hickey. 

UKELELE MUSIC. 
Two freshmen Health Eds. put on 
a clever stunt between the main 
acts, when they appealed dressed 
appropriately for St. Patrick's Day. 
The girls were: Carmella Chellini 
and "Fifi" Fox. Accompanied by a 
•'uke" the girls sang a couple of 
"popular songs, "Howdye'do Every- 
body" and "Following You." 

An original dance, put on by four 
of the girls, who clogged to the tune 
of "On the Sidewalks of New York," 
was enthusiastically applauded. The 
dance had been composed by Anita 
Gualco, one of the four girls who ap- 
peared in the act, tHe other dancers 
being, Helen Will, Ruth White and 
Betty Evans. 

A tap dancing number, staged by 
two clever artists, Caroline Newell 
and Andrew (Andy) Bowdle, was 
carried out perfectly. The dance was 
original with the couple and was 
staged with the cleverness of profes- 
sionals. 



A tarantella number, with a fair in 
Italy as the setting, was staged by 
the following students: Townspeople, 
Dorothy Asnip and Martha Henry; 
juggler, Elizabeth Eby; peddler, Wil- 
bur Schopf; balloon man, William 
Smith; fortune teller, "Sis" Breitin- 
ger; farmer's wife who had her for- 
tune told, Louvenia Miller; gypsy 
dancers, Julia Landis, Myrtle Pot- 
teiger, Betty Shaw and Dora Ful- 
mer, the four having originated the 
dance themselves; Italian dancers, 
Richard Hohenshelt, Francis Tweed, 
Thomas Closser, George Ramaley, 
Mildred Miller, Mildred Reagan, 
Martha Cooper and Polly Bauer. 
bOME CLEVER TAKE-OFFS. 
A take-off on Tony Surg's marion- 
ettes, who entertained a college audi- 
ence some weeks ago, was put on 
by Martha Henry and Elizabeth Eby. 
Jimmy Aikens, on the shoulders of 
Joe George, tool; the part of Tony 
Sarg. 

Another take-off was staged by 
Dorothy Asnip and Julia Landis, who 
imitated the production put on, re- 
cently at the college by Ruth Page 
and Frank Parker. Both acts were 
well received by the audience. 

An original skit by Elizabeth Eby, 
entitled, "A Mystery Act," threw the 
house into an uproar. Those who 
took part were: Elizabeth Eby, Lo- 
venia Miller, Myrtle Potteiger, 
Charles Cox, Wilbur Schopf and Ru- 
pert Williams. 

A PRETTY NUMBER. 
One of the prettiest numbers on 
the program was an interpretative 
dance, put on by a group of sopho- 
more Health Eds. The scarf dance, 
the "Dance of the Flames," was quite 
artistic and was carried out in grace- 
ful form. A frieze staged during which 
time a chorus of girls' voices sang 
"The Volga Boatman," was very at- 
tractive and was heartily applauded. 
The dancers in this number were: 
Margaret Keller, Betty Swartz, Vera 
Gilbert, Sue Yeager, Lois Diffen- 
backer, Mercy Smith, Ruth Bonney 
and Myra Wilson. The chorus in- 
cluded Treva Dise, Anna Pruchinchi, 
Blanche Raines, Josephine Flinch- 
baugh, Betty Wilson, Mary Pyle, 
Margaret Schrack, Martha Cooper 
and Hazel Cromarty. 
"SINGING IN THE BATHTUB." 
An original dance, carried out to 
the tune of the popular song, "Sing- 
ing in the Bathtub," and composed 
by Mardette Walter, was staged by 
Sue Yeager, Margaret Keller, Betty 
Swartz, Mildred Reagan, Dorothy 
Asnip and Martha Henry. The cho- 
rus was sung by Carmella Chellini 
and ••Fifi" Fox. 



THE THREE TREES. 

A skit entitled "Three Trees" was 
put on by Mary Miller, Ruth Lincoln, 
Mildred Miller, Dorothy Hickey and 
Lois Diffenbacker. Vera Gilbert 
was at the piano during this act. 
THE GRAND FINALE. 

The final number of the evening 
was In the form of a dance chorus 
which had been arranged by the men 
who took part. Those who took part 
in this colorful number, which was 
concluded by the singing of the Val- 
kyrie Song, are as follows: Richard 
Hohenshelt, Herbert Pearl, Thomas 
Closser, Francis Tweed, George Ra- 
maley, William Smith, James Mc- 

~-*ar, Myra Wilson, Margaret Keller?! 
'auline Bauer, Mildred Reagan, Bet- 
;y Swartz and Dorothy Asnip. 

FACULTY MEMBERS HELPED. 

The faculty members who helped 
in the revue, besides ' Miss Mueller, 
were: Miss Myra Wade, Miss Anne 
Schaub and Miss Gladys Bowen. 

The revue committee of the Club 
included : i Miss Martha Cooper, presi- 
dent; Miss Betty Shaw, Miss Alice 
Ives and Miss Vera Gilbert. Miss 
Julia Landis and Miss Elizabeth Eby 
were in charge of the costumes, etc. 

Those who accompanied in various 
parts of the program were: Miss 
Fredu Etter, Miss Pauline Berman 
and Miss Lovenia Miller. 




DEAN WINFIELD W. MENHENNETT 



146 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



Annual Demonstration of the Actiyity Program 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 28, 1930 
Eight o'clock 

PHILIPS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

Program 

1. MARCHING Seniors and Juniors 

Instructor, Miss Searing 

2. CLOG DANCING Extra-curricular Class 

"Captain Jinks" "Country Dance" 

Instructor, Miss Wade 

3. MIMETICS Freshmen 

Instructor, Miss Searing 

4. ATHLETIC DANCING Juniors 

"Arkansas Travelers" "Rustic Dance" 

Instructor, Miss Mueller 

Juniors 



29 MARCH 1930 



5. CORRECTIVE GYMNASTICS 

Instructor, Miss Wade 

6. PLAYS AND GAMES Sophomores 

Games originated by the classes in Playground Practice 
Instructor, Miss Mueller 

7. APPARATUS Seniors and Juniors 

Instructor, Miss Searing 

8. AESTHETIC DANCING Seniors 

"Sorrentina" "Plyasovaia" 

Instructor, Miss Wade 

9. ATHLETICS Freshmen 

"The Wax Works" 
Instructor, Miss Bowen 

10. FOLK DANCE - „ Juniors 

"Irish Lilt" "Csehbogar" 

Instructor, Miss Mueller 

11. PYRAMIDS AND TUMBLING Sophomores and Freshmen 

Instructor, Miss Searing 

12. NATURAL DANCING Extra-curricular Classes 

Instructors, Miss Schaub and Miss Wade 

GIRLS' GYM DEMONSTRATION 

The annual demonstration of the girls 
of the Health Education Department was 
held on Friday night, March 28, 1930. in 
the Philips Memorial Auditorium. 

The program was as follows: 

Marching Seniors and Juniors 

Clog Dancing — Capt. Jinks and Country Dance 

Extra-Curricular Class 

Mimetics Freshmen 

Athletic Dancing — Arkansas Traveler and Rustic 

Dance Juniors 

Corrective Gymnastics Juniors 

Plays and Games Sophomores 

Apparatus Seniors and Juniors 

Aesthetic Dancing — Plyasovaia and Sorrentina 

Seniors 

Athletics — "The Wax Works" Freshmen 

Folk Dance — Irish Lilt and Csehbogar Juniors 

Pyramids & Tumbling — Sophomores & Freshmen 
Natural Dancing Extra-Curricular Class 



COLLEGE GIRLS IN 

HEALTH-ED. STUNTS 

Annual Gymnastic Exhibition At- 
tracts Larea Audience. 
Many Briglit Features. Showing; Skill 
and Endurance, Please Stu- 
dents and Their Visllin? 
Friends. 

The annual demonstration of the 
dflllv activity program of the students 
in the Health Education Department 
of the State TeacHers College, this 
place, was given last evening In the 
Philips Memorial Chapel, South High 
street, that was crowded with the stu- 
dents of the college and their friends, 
including many residents of this bor- 
ough. 

The affair was under the direction 
and supervision of Miss Schaub, Miss 
Wade, Miss Mueller, Miss Bowen and 
Miss Searing, Instructors in the 
Health Education Department, and 
the scores of pretty and agile girls 
who participated with unbounded 
gusto and praiseworthy effort, repre- 
sented the several classes of the 
Health Education Department of the 
College. 

There were thirteen numbers on the 
program, all of which were greatly 
appreciated and enjoyed by the large 
assemblage, who heartily applauded 
the deeds of dexterity, skill and dar- 
ing so ably displayed by *hose who 
took part "in the several events and 
varied stunts. 

The curtain-raiser was a series of 
marches, by sixteen girls of the senior 
and the junior classes, with Mlssi 
Elizabeth Terrels, of Swarthmorc. as 
the commander of the group, who 
executed with marked precision and 
alacrity numerous evolutions from 
column of squads into line, into single 
file, line of files into column of fours, 
etc., that evoked a storm of applause 
as they marched from the stags. 

One of the particularly pleasing 
numbers on the program was thei 
clog-dancing, by a class of twelve i 
barelegged girls, attired In rompers, of I 
various colors and designs, represent- 
ing the extra-curricular class, and in- 
structed by Miss Wade, These girls 
delighted the audience with proficient 
rendition of two pleasing dances— 
"Captain Jinks" and the 'Country 
Dance," and were recalled by the pro- 
longed encore. 

Twenty-four of the girls of the 
freshmen class entertained with 
mimetics, introducing in successions 
of rope-Jumping, see-saw, the swing, 
playing marbles, spinning, the fight. 
etc., and then followed athletic danc- 
ing by ten junior girls in the "Arkan- 
sas Traveler," followed by 'en in a 
production of a "Rustic Dance," these 
girls having been Instructed by Miss 
Berenic li. Mueller. 



Twenty little Juniors, instructed by 
Miss Wade, gave demonstration ot 
corrective gymnastics, including col- 
lege foot ball, a group of the girls ly- 
ing supinely on the stage and pro- 
pelling the ball In lively way with 
their feet extended upward. 

PLAYS AND GAMES. 

With Miss Mueller as Instructor, 
about thirty girls of the sophomore 
class, amused and entertained with a 
series of games originated by the 
classes in playground practice. This 
event was a "scream," and proved in- 
tensely interesting. The opening af- 
fr.lr was the visit to the Zoo, where 
the monkey, the elephant, and other 
the girls encountred the bear, the lion, 
wild animals, and then followed an 
exciting game, "The Scarcrow and the 
Blackbirds," followed by the Chinese 
Lady Tag," the "Fllp-Flop Relay," the 
"Yellow Jacket," the "HumaD Ten 
Pins," the "Padukah Tag," and the 
grand finale, "The Pirates," the latter 
play being accompanied with a merry 
scng. 

A bevy of well-trained Seniors and 
Juniors gave some skillful work on 
the apparatus — horse, bars, etc., ex- 
hibited proficiency in head and hand- 
stands, etc, that won them deserved 
applause. 

About a dozen or so Seniors con- 
tributed two pleasing dances, "Ply- 
asovia," in which the girls wore bright 
red sashes and scarfs. The second 
dance was "Serrentina," in which the 
participants merrily trumped upon 
metallic tambourines, in joyous man- 
ner. 

PRETTY WAX-WORKS. 

Under the instruction of Miss 
Bowen, twenty girls of the Freshman 
class proved their prowess as auto- 
matons In the number termed "The 
Wax-Works," In which they were 
amply wound up and performed at 
soccer, hockey, c-aske "jail, fencing, 
swimming, archery, tennis and base 
ball, etc. 

Nine Jnnior girls participated in a 
folk dance, "The Irish Lilt," and 11 
others in another folic dance, the 
"Csehbogar." 

Forty Sophomore and Freshmen 
girls took part' in a clever exhibition 
of pyramids and tumbling, most of 
them displaying rare ability in num- 
erous cts of 'irt . and skill. Fol- 
lowing was an exhibition of natural 
dancing and slopping, by twenty-two 
bare-legged girls of the extra cur- 
ricular class, who were attired in 
varied raiments of the semi-diaphan- 
ous materials. 

An- extra number that concluded 
the "big show" was the scarf- dance, 
"The Dance of the Flam?s," by a sex- 
tette of the girls, who' contribuated 
this dance at the ecent Valkyrie Re- 
vue, and so closed the delightful en- 
tertainment. 



DR. JAMES G. BLISS 147 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



WEST CHESTER, PA. 



Annual Demonstration of the Activity Program 

IN 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Presented by Senior Majors 
FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 4, 1930. 

Eight o'clock 
PHILIPS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

X 

Program 

1. DANISH GYMNASTICS Freshmen 

Senior Leader, Michael Guido 

2. DANCING Seniors 

Saneo-Clog Duo-Athletic 

Senior Leader, Harry Donald 

3. HUMAN APPARATUS Selected 

Senior Leader, Joe George 

4. STUNTS Selected 

Senior Leader, James Crawford 

5. PYRAMIDS ON APPARATUS Selected 

Senior Leader, Jerome Kernan 

6. ANTAGONISTICS Seniors 

Fencing Wrestling 

Senior Leader, Eugene Deakins 

7. HAND APPARATUS Sophomores and Juniors 

Wands and Dumb-Bells 
Senior Leader, William Kumkle 

8. GAMES Freshmen 

Antagonistic Obstacle Relay 

Senior Leader, Leo Atkinson 

9. TUMBLING Sophomores 

Senior Leader, Clarke Allison 

10. FOLK DANCING Juniors 

Pirate Tarantella 

Cabin Dance 

Senior Leader, James Aikens 

11. APPARATUS .Selected 

Horizontal Bar Horse 

Parallel Bars Rings 

Senior Leader, Andrew Bowdle 

Committee Health Education Department 
Elean^re Aldwcrth, Chairman 
Earle E. Waters 
Bernice L. Mueller 



PURPLE AND GOLD 

The Annual Demonstration of the Activity 
Program of the Men Health Education 
Students was presented by the Senior Majors 
on Friday evening, April 4, 1930, at eight 
o'clock in the Gymnasium. 

PROG R A M 

1. Danish Gymnastics Freshmen 

Senior Leader, MICHAEL gvido 

2. Dancing Seniors 

Saneo-Clog Duo-Athletic 

Senior Leader, harry DONALD 

3. Human Apparatus Selected 

Senior Leader, joe GEORGE 

4. Stunts Selected 

Senior Leader, james Crawford 

5. Pyramids on Apparatus Selected 

Senior Leader, jerome kernan 

6. Antagonistics Seniors 

Fencing Wrestling 

Senior Leader, eugene deakins 

7. Hand Apparatus Sophomores and Juniors 

Wands and Dumb-Bells 
Senior Leader, WILLIAM kunkle 

8. Games Freshmen 

Antagonistic Obstacle Relay 

Senior Leader, leo atkinson 

9. Tumbling Sophomores 

Senior Leader, clarke allison 

10. Folk Dancing Juniors 

Pirate Tarantella 

Cabin Dance 

Senior Leader, james aikens 

1 1 . Apparatus Selected 

Horizontal Bar Horse 

Parallel Bars Rings 

Senior Leader, ANDREW bowdle 

In every detail the program was admir- 
ably managed and expertly executed and 
the demonstration will remain one of the 
most interesting events of the year. 



Next Friday night, the young men 
of the college will give an exhibition 
of athletics, games and va. Id stunts, 
among the leaders being Guida, 
Harry Donald, Joe George, Crawford, 
Kernan, Deakins, Kunkle, Leo At- 
kinson, Allison, Jimmie Aikens, Andy 
Bowdle and other well-known young 
men of the college. 



148 DR. JAMES G. BLISS 



"The Queen's Holiday" 

A Pageant by the 

Class of Nineteen-thirty 

State Teachers College 

West Chester, Pa. 

MONDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 26, 1930 

2 O'clock (Standard Time) 

-^- 

South Campus 
PROCESSION 

The Queen's Champion 

Heralds 

The Court Fencers and Archers 

Pages 

Courtiers 

THE QUEEN'S MAJESTY— ELIZABETH 

Ladies in Attendance 

Pages 

Oxford Worthies 

Ballad Singers 

Players in Daphne Pantomime 



Robin Hood Interlude 
Midsummer Night's Dream Episode chimney Sweeps' Dance 
Morris Dancers 



ORDER OF EVENTS 

Fencing feats by Her Majesty's Court Fencers 

Robin Hood Interlude 

Portraying the introduction of Friar Tuck and the Jolly 
Miller to Robin Hood's Band. 

Ballad — "Brown October Ale," sung by Friar Tuck and 
the Outlaws. 

Archery contest between Court Fencers and the Outlaws 

Ballad— "Oh, No, John, No." 

Milk-maids' Dance 

Morris Dance — "Bean Setting" 

Daphne Pantomime 

Diana and her Huntresses come on full tilt in the chase. 
A chorus of Zephyrs herald the approach of Daphne 
and her team of Butterflies. Apollo enters playing 
his lyre. He sees Daphne and pursues her. To 
stay the ardor of Apollo, Daphne calls upon the 
River God, who sends the Zephyrs to waft her away. 

Ballad— "Raggle, Taggle Gypsies, 0." 

Gypsies' Dance. 

Morris Dancers — "Flamborough Sword." 



Milk-maids 
Chimney Sweeps 
Gypsies 



Director 

Elizabeth May Roberts 

Art and Costume 

Marion Farnham 



Ballad— "Country Gardens." 

Will Shakespeare presents his own players in an episode from 

"Midsummer Night's Dream." 
Minuet— Lords and Ladies of the Court. 
Faculty Coaches 



Gertrude Schmidt 



Anna Schaub 



FOREWARD 

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth, in the course of her 
progresses through her kingdom, visits Oxford and there on the 
green receives her loyal and devoted subjects. They sing and 
dance, perform feats of skill and prowess for her entertainment. 

To show their appreciation to the people for their 
entertainment the lords and ladies of the court dance a grace- 
ful minuet. After graciously thanking her subjects, the Queen 
passes on to the castle where a great feast has been prepared. 



Myra Wade 



Bernice Mueller 

Gladys Bowen 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 149 




VI. Mr. Harry R. Allen 

Director of Physical Education 1930-1947 

He was born October 22, 1879 and attended the public schools in Whitewater Wisconsin. 
Enrolling in the Normal College of the American Gymnastic Union at Indianapolis, he received his 
diploma in 1909 and then accepted a position as Teacher Supervisor in Indianapolis. 

He came to Pennsylvania and accepted a teaching position in the public schools of Philadelphia, 
during this period he also taught at the Normal School in that city until 1920. 

He then accepted a position as Supervisor of Physical Education in the State Department of 
Public Instruction at Harrisburg. He next returned to the Philadelphia Normal School at which time 
he enrolled in Temple University. He attained both the bachelors and masters degrees by 1930 



150 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Mr. Harry R. Allen Staff Assistants 1930-1947 

SERVICE GYMNASTIC 

NAME DATES PROGRAMS 

Harry R. Allen 1930-1947 27 March 1931 

17/18 March 1933 

23/24 March 1934 

21/22/23 March 1935 

7 March 1937 

11 March 1937 

17 March 1939 

Earle C. Waters 1928 (See Dr. Bliss' Section) 

21 March 1931 M 

11 March 1932 

17/18 March 1933 

23/24 March 1934 

21/22/23 March 1935 

7 March 1936 

11 March 1937 

17 March 1939 

14/15 March 1941 



Myra I Wade 1928 (See Dr. Bliss Section) 

6 February 1931 W 

18 March 1932 

30 April 1932 

17/18 March 1933 

6 January 1934 

23/24 March 1934 

21/22/23 March 1935 

7 March 1936 

10 March 1937 

12 March 1938 

14 May 1938 

17 March 1939 
14/15 March 1941 

Anne M Schavb 1930 (See Dr. Bliss' Section) 

6 February 1931 W 

18 March 1932 
30 April 1932 

17/18 March 1933 

21/22/23 March 1935 

6 January 1935 

14 May 1938 

14/15 March 1941 

Eleanore Aldworth 1930-1938 (See Dr. Bliss' Section) 

18 March 1932 

24 March 1933 

14 May 1938 

14/15 March 1941 

Gladys Bowen 1930-1932 6 February 1931 

18 March 1932 

Howard A. Wescott 1931-1935 23 March 1934 

C. Van Dyke Conover 1931-1935 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 151 



NAME 
Muriel Leach 



SERVICE 
DATES 


GYMNASTIC 
PROGRAMS 


1931 
1931-1933 


18 March 1932 

17/18 March 1933 

6 January 1934 

21/22/231935 

14 May 1938 

14/15 March 1941 

11 April 1931 
18 March 1932 



Janice Goodwin 



Walter A. Cox 



1932 



Aldan W. Thompson 



1934-1936 



23/24 March 1934 



W. Glen Killinger 


1934 


23/24 March 1934 
14/15 March 1941 




Munroe Maclean 


1934-1935 


21/22/23 March 1935 




Charles L. Graham 


1935-1951 


14/15 March 1947 
26/27 April 1947 




Lloyd H. Lux 


1938-1942 


14/15 March 1941 




Elinore Zimmerli 


1940-1942 


14/15 March 1941 




Russell L. Sturzebecker 


1946-1981 


26/27 April 1947 
17 July 1947 




Mrs. Margery Moffett 


1946 


26/27 April 1947 




Mrs. A. Henry 


1946 


26/27 April 1947 




Mrs. Alexander 


1946 


26/27 April 1947 





152 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Health and Physical Education Department 
(L. to R.) Gladys Bowen, Earle Waters, Eleanore Aldworth, C. Van Dyke Conover, 
Director Harry R. Allen, Howard Wescott, Muriel Leach, Myra Wade Anne Schaub. 



Moore Literary Society Anniversary i 8 72 

The Outstanding Event of the Fall Semester 

TED SHAWN AND DENISHAWN DANCERS 



1930 



Fresh from their triumphs at the Lewisohn 
Stadium in New York, where thousands were 
turned away at each performance, Ted Shawn 
and the Denishawn Dancers will appear at 
State Teachers College on Saturday night, 
Oct. 25th., to offer the 58th Anniversary pro- 
gram of the Moore Literary Society. 

The program will abound in novelties and, 
as has always been the rule in Denishawn 
offerings in the past, it will have exceptional 
variety. Of particular interest will be the 
new dances which Mr. Shawn brought back 
from Europe, where he made an extensive 
tour during the past spring and early summer. 
These will include a Bavarian group, — a ma- 
zurka by Wachs, and in a comedy vein "A 
Bavarian Holiday," danced by Mr. Shawn, 
assisted by Ernestine Day and Regenia Beck, 
in the quaint costumes of the Tyrol. From 
Spain, where he spent Easter in order to wit- 
ness the centuries old dance ritual given in 
the Seville Cathedral, comes a Flamenco Scene 
entitled "Andalusia," for the star and the 
entire company. Joined with it in an Hispanic 
Suite will be "La Rumba," a sensational native 
dance from Cuba, to be performed to native 
music by Mr. Shawn and Miss Day, and a 



sprightly and colorful Mexican "Hat Dance," 
a duet for Gladys Tinker and Campbell 
Griggs. 

The Orient will be represented by a new 
Cawnpore Nautch by the ensemble, a Cam- 
bodian solo by Miss Beck, Mr. Shawn's justly 
admired "Spear Dance Japonesque," and "In 
a Shantung Garden," a solo for Miss Day. 

Adding to his gallery of portraits of the 
American Indian, Mr. Shawn will present 
Osage-Pawnee "Dance of Greeting," paired 
with "Invocation to the Thunderbird," in 
which he will have assistance from Mr. Griggs 
and Jack Cole. 

Music Visualizations will include composi- 
tions by Brahms, Scriabin, Max Reger, De- 
bussy, and Griffes and popular numbers as- 
signed to the ensemble will include a "Valse 
Bn'llante", by Mana Zucca and de Lachau's 
"Valse Extase." 

The assisting company features Ernestine 
Day and includes Regenia Beck, Gladys Tink- 
er, Martha Hinman, Phoebe Baugham, Vivian 
Berman, Muriel Barnett, Campbell Griggs 
and Jack Cole. Mary Campbell, a concert 
pianist of wide reputation, will supply the 
accompaniments. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 153 




Harry R. Allen 

B.S., M.S., Temple Univer- 
sity 
Health Education (Director) 

FORMER STATE CHIEF 
GETS COLLEGE POST 

Dr. Harry Allen Will Head Health 
Education Department Here. 

The appointment of a new head 
for the Department of Health Edu- 
cation at the State Teachers Col- 
lege, in this place, was revealed yes- 
terday by Dr. Norman W. Cameron, 
President, wh is now completing de- 
tails in connection with the twentieth 
summer session to be held at the 
Teachers College, beginning June 23. 
The new Health Education head is 
Dr. Harry Allen, for six years Su- 
pervisor of Physical and Health Edu- 
cation in the State Department cf 
Public Instruction, and at present the 
head om Health Education work in 
the Philadelphia Normal School. 

Dr. Allen is a graduate of Temple 
University, where he was awarded hm 
Bachelor's and Master's Degrees, and 
later studied at the University og 
Pennsylvania, completing his studies 
at the Normal College of Physical 
Education in Indianapolis. He has 
had many years of successful supervi- 
sory work as well as classroom expe- 
rience. 

Dr. Allen will take up his new duties 
in this place at the opening of the 
summer session and will continue as 
head of the Health Education De- 
partment throughout the college year. 






\V. 


A. 


Cox 


B.S., 


University of Wis- 


consin 






M.A., 


, Col 


umbia L'niver- 


sity 










MR. EARLE C. WATERS 



Mr. Earle C. Waters, member of 
our health education faculty, was 
born at New Haven, Connecticut. In 
his youth much of his time was 
spent on athletic fields competing 
for the Bancroft-Foote Club in A. 
A. U. meeets and for St. James' 
Church in church leagues. His 
summers he spent on the Quinnipiac 
River and Long Island Sound with 
boats or canoes, and as a member 
of the Quinnipiac Canoe Club he 
raced in single and double canoe 
races in the yacht club annual re- 
gatta. 

•After elementary education at 
Strong School in New Haven, Mr. 
Waters graduated from New Haven 
High School. He then went to 



Clark College at Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, where he was a member of 
the U. S. Infantry in the Officers 
Training Corps. Later he attended 
Arnold College, New Haven, Con- 
necticut. He spent a summer at 
Columbia University and attended, 
at Bucknell College, the Rockne- 
Meanwell Coaching School. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree from Syra- 
cuse University, where he majored 
in physical education, and his M.E. 
degree at Temple as a psychology 
major. 

Mr. Waters has held teacherships 
at New Haven for two years; at 
Waverly School, Waverly, N. Y. for 
one year; at Calvary Baptist Church, 
Syracuse, for one year; at West- 
hampton Beach, New York, for five 
years, and has been at West Chester 
since 1927. 

Here he has taught hyginene, ap- 
plied . anatomy, scouting, boxing, 
wrestling, fencing, athletics, swim- 
ming and gymnastics. He has 
coached with great success our soc- 
cer team, our track and field team, 
and our gym team. Both at West 
Chester and elsewhere his teams have 
had very high records. A girls' 
soccer which he coached at West- 
hampton was for six consecutive 
years county champions. Our own 
soccer team has been very success- 
ful. 




C. Van Dyke Conoveh 
Ph.B.,Tavlor University 




How 


AHI) A. 


\Y 




B.S.. Mkhi 
Normal C« 


L'.lll 


St.Uc 


M.A., 


Co! u m 




l 


nivcr- 


Mtv 











Another appointment was also made 
by Dr. Cameron, in the person of 
Howard A. Wcscott, a graduate of the 
Michigan State Teachers College, and 
Columbia University, New York City. 
Mr. Wescott has also done graduate 
work r.t. the University of Michigan. 
He will aid in coaching of athletics 
and wiil also teach courses in the 
special four-year Health Education 
curriculum. Mr. Wescott will also 
assume his duties here, at. the open- 
ing of the 20th summer session the 
latter part of this month. 



154 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



A PROGRAM OF DANCING 

PRESENTED BY 

MEMBERS OF THE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION FACULTY 



6 FEBRUARY 1931 



FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 6, 1931 



8.00 P. M. 



PART I-NATURAL DANCING 

Dance of Greeting Schubert 

The Frolic Schubert 

In a Garden Aletter 

The Struggle Rachmaninoff 

Waltz Study Chopin 

Pyrrhic Dance Chopin 

PART II— FOLK DANCING 

Slavak Folk Melody 

Flemish Folk Melody 

Italian Lomas 

Swiss Mountaineers Sckubeit 

PART III— CLOG AND CHARACTER DANCING 

Cotton Pickers Strickland 

Reuben arr. by Garland 

Clown Dance Platzmann 

The Stepping Quartette arr. by Garland 

Tap Specialty McHugh 

On Deck arr. by Garland 

In the Cornfield arr. by Garland 

Helen Bear at the Piano 



DANCING EXHIBITION 
AT COLLEGE TO-NIGHT 

Women uf Physical Education ' Ue- 

nartmeni Participate in Varied 

Procram on Staye, 

At. the State Teachers College this 
evening the women members of the 
Physical Culture Education Depart- 
ment are giving an entertainment for 
the benefit of the Women's Athletic 
Association. The program has bee:'' 
arranged bv the women members c>: 
the Health. Education Department 
and is under the direction of .Mis< 
Anno M. Schaub snd her assistant; 
The program includes natural c!;l:k-- 
ing. foil; dancing, clod uiui charar.Iei 
dancmg, and is being given on tilt 
stage in the Philips Memorial Audi- 
torium. 



7 FEBRUARY 1931 



HEALTH ED FACULTY 

GIVE DANCE EXHIBIT 

Teachers -at College Present Three 
Types of Stage Dancing in Pro- 
gram Pre— ired For Athletic 
Association. 

Members 01 the faculty of the 
Health Education Department at the 
State Teachers College here cnter- 
tained in a program of exhibition 
r'-'-'oes Ian nieht on the stage of the 
Pnilip;, Memorial Auditorium, under 
tne uui,tuoa ol Miss Anna M. Schaub 

Those who tool: part in the dances 
ivere : Miss Schaub, Miss Delia Leach, 
Miss Gladys Bowen, Miss Myra I. 
Wade and Miss Goodwin. 

Although primarily given for the 
benefit of the Women's Athletic As- 
sociation of the Teachers College, as 
a regular annual feature of the 
Health program, all students of the 
College were invited, and a large 
n , umb ? r "tended. The program in- 
VXa , natura > dancing, folk dancing, 
ana clog dancing, the folk dancing 
being given-in costume. 





Myra I. Wade 
B.A., Oberlin College 

M.A.. Columbia L'mvci 
sitv 




Gladys Bowen 

B.S., Teachers College 
Columbia University 




(ank E Gl K>[)\VIN 
Sargent School ■ <!' Ph\ si- 

c.;l Eilucati' -n 
B.S., M.A., Colurabu 

L'niversitv 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 155 






1 

N 

C 



c 



156 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



g>tate Ceacfjer* College 

at 
meat Chester, $a. 

Men's Annual Demonstration 

of the 

Activity Program in Health Education 

Presented by Senior Majors Saturday Evening, March 21, 1931 

Eight fifteen o'clock 

NEW GYMNASIUM 



PROGK AM 



21 MARCH 1931 



1. Marching Freshmen 

Senior Leaders . . L. Sennin— F. McLear 

2. Danish Gymnastics • • Sophomores 

Senior Leaders . . W. Schopf— R. Williams 

3. Pyramids Juniors 

Senior Leaders . . A. Maloy— C. Cunningham 

4. Fencing Seniors 

Senior Leaders . . C. Cox— I. Kepner 

5. Tumbling Sdected 

Senior Leaders . . R. Kelly— V. Graham 

6. Clowns Juniors 

Senior Leaders . . P. Boyd— M. Minch— M. Singer 

7 Bells and Wands .... Freshmen and Sophomores 
Senior Leaders . . V. Tweed— A. Ottaviano— T. Clouser 

8. Apparatus Selected 

Senior Leaders . . G. Ramaley— W. Smith 

9. Statues Selected 

Senior Leaders . . L. Dimm— M. MacLean 

10. Dancing 8eniors 

Topsy . . Irish Waltz Clog . . Duo 

Senior Leaders 
H. Pearl . . . G. Hohenshelt 



GYM EXHIBITION 
AT HOME COLLEGE 

Boys Will Stage First of Two 
Annual Health-Ed Dem- 
onstrations. 



WILL USE NEW FLOOR 



The first of two demonstrations of 
the activities of West Chester State 
Teachers College Health and Physical 
Education Department will be held 
at the new gymnasium this evening. 
It will be staged by the male students 
of the college, and will begin at 8:00 
o'clock. 

Next Friday evening the girls will 
put on their exhibition. This also 
will be held at the new gymnasium. 

Both program- will be under the 
supervision and management of Dr. 
Harry R. Allen, Director of the 
Health and Physical Education De- 
partment. 

The program for to-morrow evening 
will include varied movements in 
marching, by the Freshmen Class, 
with these Senior leaders: Sennin 
and McLear. 

Danish gymnastics, by Sophomore 
Class, with Senior leaders: Wilbur 
Schott" and Rupert A: Williams. 

Pyramids, by Junior Class, with 
Senior leaders: Arnold A. Maloy and 
Charles Cunningham. 

Fencing, by Senior Class, with 
Senior leaders: Charles Cox and Ir- 
vin C. Kepner. 

Tumbling, by selected group, with 
Senior leaders: Van E. Graham and 
Robert H. Kelly. 

Clowns, Junior Class, with Senior 
leaders: Phillips Boyd, Matthew 
Minch end Morris Singer. 

Bells and Wands, by Freshmen and 
Sophomores, with Senior leaders: 
Francis Tweed, Andrew Ottaviano 
and 'Thomas Clouser. 

Apparatus, by selected group, with 
Senior leaders: George Ramaley and 
William C. Smith. 

Statutes, by selected group, with 
Senior leaders: Leroy Dimm and 
Munroe MacLean. 

Dancing, by Senior Class, with 
leaders: Herbert Pearl and Gtorge 
Hohenshelt. The dances: Topsy, 
Irish waltz clog and duo. 



MARCH PURPLE AND GOLD 

GYM. DEMONSTRATION 

The annual demonstration of the Men's De- 
partment of Health and Physical Education 
was held in the new gymnasium on Friday, 
March 20. As usual, this event was one of 
the high-lights of the season. It was the first 
opportunity for a great many visitors to see 
our new athletic building, and to them it was 
a treat. A great many folks look forward to 



this event for it is something different — not 
an exhibition of skill shown in a musical pro- 
gram or in a single athletic contest, but an all 
around exhibition in which various skills can 
be shown combining both the physical and the 
musical. Too much credit cannot be given 
Mr. Waters for putting this event across, for 
it was he who spent a great deal of time and 
energy in preparing the different events and 
supervising the work of the senior leaders. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 157 



Department of Health and Physical Education 

State Teachers College 

West Chester, Pa. 

girls' gymnasium meet 

March 27, 1931 New Gymnasium 

at eight o'clock 

Seniors and Sophomores (Red) 

Vs. 
Juniors and Freshmen (Blue) 

PROGRAM 



27 MARCH 1931 



Song — 5 Points 

Senior and Sophomore Leaders 

Junior and Freshman Leaders 

Cheer — 5 Points 

Senior and Sophomore Leaders 

Junior and Freshman Leaders 



. Delia Leech and Margaret Hoopes 
Lois Dieffenbaeher and Dorothy Derk 

Mardette Walters and Zora Faschnact 
. Helen Gordon and Adalene Whitesel 



II 



Marching — 10 Points 

Senior Leader Ethel Breitinger 

Junior Leader Myra Wilson 

III 
Apparatus — 10 Points 
1. Horse 

a. Fencers' rear vault 
B. Thief vault 
c. Face vault 

D. Squat straddle vault 

E. Straddle vault 
Parallel Bars (original exercise) 
Vaulting over the high elephant from springboard 

A. Flank vault 

B. Face vault 

C. Attempt a hand stand 
Straddle vault over the buck for height 
Scaling the high elephant 

IV 



2. 
3. 



4. 
5. 



Stunts, Tumbling and Pyramids — 10 Points 

V 

Dancing — 10 Points 
Seniors 

A. Clogging — Saneo Medley, Lyza Jane 

B. Folk dancing — Tarantella, Russian Scherr 
Juniors 





A. 
B. 


Clogging — Lindy Lee, 
Folk dancing — Ostend, 


Waltz Clog 
Highland Fling 








VI 










Relay Races — 10 Points 












1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 


Rope climbing 
Hoop race 
Roller skating 
Chariot 












5. 


Obstacle 














Class Representatives 








Senior 


. . Martha Cooper Junior 
Ella Mat Jackson Freshm 






Mercy 
Ruth 


Smith 


Sophomore 


en . . 




Byler 



GIRLS EXHIBIT 
GYMNASIUM SKILL 

Fine Program of Contests to 

Be Presented in Annual 

Meet Here. 

Gprls of the Department of Health 
and Physical Education at West 
Chester State Teachers College will 
participate in their annual gym- 
nasium meet at the new college gym 
this evening. The program will start 
at 8 o'clock. 

The first event on the program will 
be a . contest of songs, with Delia 
Leech and Margaret Hoopes as the 
Senior and Sophomore ■ leaders, and 
Lois Diffenbacher and Dorothy Derk 
as the Junior and Freshman leaders. 
Cheers will follow, with Mardette 
Walters and Zora Fashnact, leading 
the Seniors and Sophomores and 
Helen Gordon and Adalene Whitesel 
leading the Juniors and Freshmen 
Ethel Breitinger will lead the Seniors 
and Myra Wilson will lead the Juni- 
ors in marching. 

Other events on the program will 
include apparatus drills, stunts, 
tumbling and pyramids, dancing and 
relay races. 

The class representatives are: 
Senior. Martha Cooper; Junior, 
Mercy Smith; Sophomore, Ella May 
Jackson; Freshmen. Ruth Ryler. 

The exhibition wll! be under the 
supervision of Dr. Harry Allen, head 
of the Department of Health and 
Physical Education. 




Muriel Leach 
.M.A., Columbia Uni 
sitv 




El^ANORF. Aldworth 

B.S., Teachers College 
Columbia University 



158 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



PAGEANT 

AROUND THE WORLD IN FOLK DANCING 
presented "by- 
Senior b in the Music Education Department 
STATS TE.-.CKERS COLLEGE 
West Chester, Pa. 
April 11, 1931 7:30 P.M. Philips Memorial Building 

Toddy - Florence Davis 
Lil - Lillian Keener 



Rustic Dance - England Chalif 
Feder Mikkel - Denmark Ainsworth 
Holland Kiddies - Holland Serova 
Wooden Shoe Dance - Holland Chalif 
Tambourin, Le - France Chalif 
Cachucha - Spain 
Italian Tambourine - Italy 
Barvarian Dance - Germany Chalif 



Tatra - Capathian Mts. 

Russo - Slav Russia 

Russian Dance Russia 

Chinese Dance China Serova 

Indian Dar.ce America 

Colonial Minuet America 

Old Homeland - Anerica Burchenal 

Clogging 



Finale 
Student Participants 



Doris Ackerman 
Eloise Bates 
Alma 3oyer 
Elsie Cullis 
Marjorie Dunn 
Esther Fenton 
Thelma Frye 
Florence Davie. (Toddy) 
Fred Zeller 

Roy Bergey 



Reba Hurst 
Ruth Jenkins 
Louise Kauffman 
Elizabeth Kepner 
Marie Klausroan 
Carolyn Kline 
Ruth Kofahler 



Charles Eggert 



Anna Shillow 
Ailean Shook 
Irer.e Skari-onovicz 
Eli^vjbe'th olotter 
Do:-p ~hy Smith 
Katrryn Snyder 
Eva "runk 

Lillian Keener (Lil) 
John Caldwell 



Harry Haigh 



Writer of Pageant 
Director of Pageant 
Scenery 
Piano 



11 APRIL 1931 



DANCE PAGEANT AT 
i- . COLLEGE TO-NIGHT 

Folk' Dances or All Nations Will Be 
Seen In Student Program Here. 

Seniors in the Music Education De- 
partment of the State Teachers Col- 
lege are presenting a program entitled 
"Around the World in Folk Dances" 
to-night. It will be held in the 
Philips Memorial Auditorium. 

The program is arranged in the 
form of a pageant, created by Caro- 
lyn Kline, and directed by Miss Jan- 
iece Goodwin. Twenty-eight students 
of the Music Education Department 
will be seen in the sixteen dances 
scheduled, and strict adherence to 
type in costuming and technique of 
the dance will be observed. The 
pageant will start, at 7.30. 



Carolyn Kline 
Janiece Goodwin 
Hazel Lar:born 
Dorothy Keffer 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 159 



NEW GYMNASIUM AT STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 




Dedication exercises for the new gymnasium were held this morning at the 'State 
Teachers College. The new building, situated at the southwest corner of Church street 
and College avenue, will be known as the Ehinger Gymnasium, in honor of Dr. and Mrs. 
Clyde E. Ehinger, of Keokuk, Iowa. Dr. Ehinger organized the Department of Physical 
and Health Education at the college many years ago. 

Dedication of Nezv Gymnasium 



With members of the Board of Trustees, 
members of the faculty, and several hundred 
students present on September 15, 1930, the 
cornerstone of the new gymnasium of the 
West Chester State Teachers College was laid. 

The dedication service, which started at 
three o'clock, was opened with prayer by the 
Rev. N. Barton Masters, pastor of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, of West Chester. 
"America", played by the college band, was 
sung by the entire group under the leadership 
of Prof. C. Edward Hausknecht, Director of 
Music. 

After announcing the purpose of the ser- 
vice Dr. Norman W. Cameron, President of 
the College, introduced Miss Isabel Darling- 
ton, Secretary of the Board of Trustees, who 
applied the trowel and mortar for the stone, 
bearing the four numerals 1930. When the 
mortar had been placed upon the foundation 
which will support the cornerstone, four work- 
men moved the latter into position. Just be- 
fore placing the top on the stone a copper bo\ 
was carefully laid within, containing a college 
catalogue, a directory, two copies of the stu- 
dent publication, "Purple and Gold", and also 
a copy of the Daily Local News, carrying the 
story of the preparations for the laying of 
the stone. When this phase of the ceremony 
was completed, Miss Darlington sealed tlv: 
stone with mortar handed her by workmen 
nearby. 



The following articles were placed in the 
cornerstone of the gymnasium : 

A Student Handbook. 

A Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. book. 

A catalog of the college. 

A summer session book- 

A list of the faculty and administrative staff. 

A list of the student body. 

A list of the officers and administrative staff 
of the men's and women's Health Edu- 
cation department. 

A list of the Men's Student Government As- 
sociation- 

A statement of the good work done by the 
Lackawanna County Club. 

A copy of the "Pennsylvania Schoolmen's 
Journal." 

A copy of the Alumni Directory. 

A copy of the Daily Local News. 

A map of the college. 

Some pennies donated by our generous fac 
lift} ■ 

A Bible. 

Two copies of the Purple and Gold. 



160 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



State Teachers College 
West Chester, Pennsylvania 
April 16, 1931 

Dear Alumnus: 

On Saturday, May 16, the New Gymnasium recently completed 
on the College Campus will be dedicated and named in honor of Dr. 
and Mrs. C. E. Ehingcr who for many years so efficiently conducted 
the work in Physical and Health Education in the State Normal 
School. A splendid program on Health Education featured by per- 
sons distinguished in this field is being prepared and best of all. Dr. 
and Mrs. Ehinger will be with us. 

You are cordially invited to be present. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Norman W. Cameron, President 

PROGRAM OF EXERCISES 

T)edication^ 

— of— 

The Ehinger (gymnasium 

in 

Appreciation of the Services 

of 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde E. Ehinger 

9:30 A. M. (Daylight Saving Time) 

Presiding— Dr. Norman W. Cameron 

Invocation— Dr. Charles R. Williamson 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church, West Chester, Pa. 

Music 

Presentation of the Kevs of the Gymnasium to the Board of Trustees— 

Mr. Kenneth A. Rugh 

District Engineer, Department of Property and Supplies 

Acceptance and Official Naming of the Gymnasium— Col. A. M. Holding 
President of the Board of Trustees 

Address— Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger— "In Retrospect" 

Music 

Address— Dr Carl L. Schrader— "The Training of Teachers for Physical 

Education in the Light of the White 
House Conference" 
Director of Health and Physical Education 
Department of Education, Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Address— Dr. James E. Rogers— 'Rrecreation Training in a Teacher 

Training Program" 
Director, National Physical Education Service 
National Recreation Association. New York City 

Address— Dr. James N. Rule— Greetings from Department of Public In- 
struction 
Acting Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Chorus— The Audience 

* * * * 

AFTERNOON 

Championship Track Meet of State Teachers Colleges 

Chairman of Committee on Arrangements 
Mr. Harry R. Allen, Director of Health and Physical Education 



EHINGER AT 73 
SAYS HE'D LIVE 
SAMEUFE OVER 

Preventing Illness One Step 

Ahead of Practicing 

Medicine. 



EDUCATbR RECALLS 

EARLY DAYS HERE 

Organizer of Health Educa- 
tion Department at Local 
Teacher Training Institu- 
tion, and Now a Resident of 
Iowa, Is Great Lover of 
Outdoor Life. 



"Yes, I think If I had it to do over 
again, I would follow the same line," 
remarked Dr. Clyde E. Ehinger, last 
evening, as he sat chatting with one 
of ibis Oid friends in town, "There 
wis" one thing" better than" practicing' 
njjfediclne, and that it, preventing ill- 
ness. You know I was a physician 
for ten years before I took up physi- 
cal training, and I have always been 
glad I made the change. Prophylac- 
tic work. That is the idea, that is 
the", great thing. Get hold of the 
patient before he gets sick, and give 
lilta -a chance to stay •well. 1 . - 

"I liked West Chester from the firstf 
and Mrs. Ehingier and I were here 
for thirty-one years. I saw it first 
as I came in over the Frazer Branch, 
and soon after I arrived I wrote to 
Mrs. Ehinger that it was a delightful 
place. We both were greatly pleased 
with the fine, old trees and shrub- 
bery here, so well planted and so well 
preserved." 

Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger are being en- 
tertained here by Dr. and Mrs. Nor- 
man W. Cameron, at the home of the 
President of the State Teachers Col- 
lege, on Rosedale avenue. They 
knew the home forty years ago, when 
it was occupied by Thomas B. Dar- 
lington and family, and they are 
greatly interested in its transfor- 
mation. 

They will leave here on Monday 
for Atlantic City, where they are to 
be entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Jolin 
R. Hollinger at dinner that evening, 
and will meet half a hundred mem- 
bers of the State College Alumni who 
are teaching or doing other work in 
and near that city. From there they 
go to Pennington, N. J., on Tuesday 
to attend the seventieth anniversary 
of the birth of Dr. Francis Harvey 
Green, Headmaster of Pennington 
School for Boys, and altogether they 
will spend about three weeks in this 
neighborhood. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 161 



APPROPRIATE EXERCISES MARK THE 

DEDICATION OF EHINGER GYMNASIUM 

AT THE TEACHERS COLLEGE TO-DAY 



Founders oi Physical and Health Education Department 

Are Honored at Special Program; State Speakers 

Bring Congratulatory Addresses as Feature of 

Gathering Here; Massachusetts Educator 

Delivers Message. 



Dedicatory exercises for the hew 
gymnasium of the State Teachers 
College were held here this morn- 
ing in a formal program which con- 
stituted a iitting tribute to Dr. and 
Mrs. Clyde E. Ehlnger, of Keokuk, 
Iowa, who years ago were numbered 
on the faculty of the Teachers Col- 
lege here, and who were instru- 
mental in organizing the Health 
Education Department for the 
school. Henceforth, the splendid 
new building, completed two months 
ago at a cost of more than $125,000 
and embodying all the conveniences 
of modern physical training and 
recreation, will be called the Ehinger 
Gymnasium, in appreciation of the 
services of the couple who paved the 
way for Its foundation many yeais 
ago. To celebrate the dedicating 
and christening of it to-day, many 
prominent personages in the field of 
physical education were present, and 
contributed, with Dr. Ehlnger, to the 
program ' of the occasion. 

Looking back over a period of 
years which he found rich in mem- 
ories of West Chester and the State 
Teachers College here, Dr. Clyde 
Ehinger spoke this morning "In 
Retrospect." With his wife sitting 
;ust behind him on the platform, the 
man who- founded the Health Educa- 
tion System for West Chester State 
Teachers College and who servedas 
director of Physical Training here 
for a great many years, rehearsed 
the events of his life here, recalled 
the early fundation standards of the 
college and department which he cre- 
ated, and expressed the hope and the 
conviction that those standards, 
which he called unusually high, 
would endure. 

Not satisfied to lay down his task 
of working in behalf of finer phy- 
siques and finer ideals, despite ad- 
vancing years, Dr. Ehinger said that 
for the remainder of his life he would 
be engaged in "educating young peo- 
ple £b appreciate the beautiful things 



of life, and to take care of them- 
selves." Advocating the sound mind 
in the sound body, he said, "I like 
the term health education better 
than physical training, because it 
implies so much more." He spoke of 
the advancements of medicine and 
the preventive as well as curative 
strides which modern science has 
taken, contrasting this situation with 
that which existed years ago. 

Presentation of keys of the gym- 
nasium to the Board of College Trus- 
tees was made by Kenneth A. Rugh, 
District Engineer of the Department 
of Properties and Supplies of tne 
Commonwealt hof Pennsylvania. The 
key was received on behalf of the 
Board by Colonel A. M. Holding, 
President, who, in accepting it, gave 
a short synopsis of Dr. Ehinger's ca- 
reer here, and of the founding of the 
Health Education Department of the 
Satte Teachers College. Mr. Holding 
was empowered to officially designate 
the building as the Ehinger Gym- 
nasium. 

Several hundred people, including 
students, faculty and townspeople 
gathered in the gymnasium for the 
exercises, where Dr. Norman W. 
Cameron, President of the college, 
presided. With the West Chester 
State. Teachers College Band, direct- 
ed by Professor Edward Zimmer, 
opening the program with several 
spirited melodies, the crowd assem- 
bled on the main floor of the gym, 
in the gallery, and on the bleachers. 




Dr. Williamson gave the invocation, 
after which Dr. Cameron prefaced 
the program with a short address. 
He expressed his great pleasure and 
pride in the occasion, and emphasiz- 
ed £he significance of it to human 
welfare. "Sometimes," he said, "we 
look at material things in a material 
way. This morning we are looking 
at something which I think we might 
call the spiritual side, for if we could 
analyze all of the elements that have 
entered Into the construction of this 
splendid building, we would not fail 
to see the spirit with which it was 
created by those who had, a part In 
the work. It has been constructed 
for a great purpose in human society, 
and the degree to which that pur- 
pose is carried out will be the degree 
to which our human welfare will im- 
prove." 

Dr. Cameron admitted considerable 
satisfaction at being able to bestow 
Dr. Ehinger's name on the gymna- 
sium, and stated that from the very 
first, in the early stages of construc- 
tion, It had been his intention and 
desire to christen it In honor of the 
couple who have devoted so much of 
their lives and energies to the cause 
of physical training and health edu- 
cation. 

Other speakers who appeared on 
the program were Dr. Carl L. Schra- 
der, Director of Health and Physical 
Education in the Department of Edu- 
cation in Massachusetts; Dr. James 
E. Rogers, Director of the National 
Physical Education Service of the 
National Recreation Association, New 
York, and Dr. James N. Rule, Acting 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Dr. Schrader, who formerly of the 
staff of assistants under Dr. Ehlnger 
here years ago, on the college faculty, 
spoke on "The Training of Teachers 
for Physical Education In the Light 
of the White House Conference." 

Messages of congratulation vera re- 
ceived from many persona Tbo vet* 
unable to attend the exercises. 



DR. CARL SCHRADER 
DR. CLYDE EHINGER 



162 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



MARCH PURPLE AND GOLD 

GYM TEAM PERFORM 

FOR CONVENTION 

Gymnasts Under Coach Waters 

Demonstrate Various Phases At 

Scranton, Pa. 



"CEJje Jiiate {Headers College 



at 



JHesi (Ulster, fa. 



MENS' ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION 

of the 

ACTIVITY PROGRAM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



DIRECTOR ALLEN-. MAKES TRIP 



Elementary Apparatus Work; Safety 

Measures shown To Group; 

Gain Applause. 



FLOCCO, ST. Ml ON SPRINGBOARD 



On Friday, March 3rd, the West 
Chester Gym team of twenty-seven 
men, under the direction of Coach 
Earle C. Waters, and Harry Allen, 
head of the Physical Education De- 
partment, journeyed to Scranton, Pa., 
to participate in the Teachers' Con- 
vention being held there. 

Their performance was a demon- 
stration of various phases of gym- 
nastic work. They demonstrated 
the Modern Gym movement, includ- 
ing the Newest German Gymnastic 
movement. Elementary apparatus 
work and safety measures work 
were shown in detail. The apparatus 
work was limited to the buck, paral- 
lels, and mats. A spectacular event 
that gained the plaudits of the as- 
sembly was an exhibition of high ele- 
phant diving. 

Ruggerio Flocco received the ap- 
plause for the remarkable skill he 
demonstrated in his performance on 
the springboard. 

Among the group that attended 
were: Lafell, Koomar, Kiernan, 
Hawk, Snook, McLaughlin, Ramsay, 
Godsall, Atticks, Unger, A. Brown, 
H. Brown. L. Brown, Ostroff, Senita, 
Johnson, Ebbecke, Thompson, Gieb, 
Strayer, Knabb, and Hilbert. 



Presented by Senior Majors Friday Evening, March 11, 1932 

Eight fifteen o'clock 



EHINGER GYMNASIUM 



PROGRAM 
Values of Physical Education 

1. Suppleness • Freshmen 

Senior Leaders W. Styer . M. Camp 

2- Strength • Juniors 

Senior Leaders H. Marvel . W. Conrad 

3. Oganic Vigor • Selected 

Senior Leaders C. King . W. Richards 

4. Physiological Stimulation • . . . . Sophomores 

Senior Leaders C. Yetter . J. Quigc 

5- Speed Freshmen 

Senior Leaders H. Singer . M. Cooper 

6. Grace • • Seniors 

Senior Leaders E. Bailey . D. Lanckammer . I. Zarfoss 

7. Agility • Sophomores 

Senior Leaders J. Shields . W. Ryan . J. Doyle 

8. Skill Juniors 

Senior Leaders P. Mazza . D. White . P. Weigle 

9. Endurance • • Selected 

Senior Leaders M. Genner H. Slaughter 

10. Rhythm . . • Seniors 

Senior Leaders J. Kenny . M. Free 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 163 




I 
H 

— 
C 

6 
>-. 

O 

ON 



ON 



164 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



WEST CHESTER, PA.. SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 



Teachers College Students 
Demonstrate Activities of 
Physical Education Program 

Student Men Display Skill at Gymnastics and Other 

Features of Training While Capacity Crowd 

Applauds Their Efforts. But One 

Slight Mishap Mars Show. 



Technique that rivalled the acrobatics of the saw- 
dust ring was exhibited last night in the Ehinger Gym- 
nasium of the State Teachers College, when the cream 
of the College Health Ed squad went through their 
paces in the Student Men's Annual Demonstration of the 
Activity Program in Physical Education. Designed to 
bring out the values of physical education, the program 
incfuded gymnastics, calisthenics, rope climbing, fencing, 
boxing, hurdling, diving, and performances on the side- 
horse, parallel bar, high bar and flying rings. 

The capacity of the gymnasium was taxed to the 
utmost to accommodate a large crowd of students and 
townspeople, and many were unable to obtain more than 
standing room. • 

Under the direction of senior leaders, students of all 
classes took part, displaying a splendid training, co-op- 
eration, and physical development. Only one mishap 
occurred during the exhibition. This was when Walter 
Boyle fell to the floor with a painful ankle sprain after 
a fine performance on the flying rings. 



The program was arranged un-< 
der the supervision of Dr. Harry 
Allen, Director of Health Education; 
at the College, and Coach Earle C- 
Waters. Coach Waters drilled tne' 
Senior leaders in their work, and 
they in turn became responsible lorj 
the performance of the lesser ad-' 
vanced students who partlcvpated, 
last night. 

The various exhibitions, together 
with the Senior leaders and the par- 
ticipating squads, are as follows: 

Suppleness, W. Styer and M. 
Camp, leaders, performed by 
Freshmen; strength, H. Marvel and 
W. Conrad, leaders, performed by 
Juniors; organic vigor, C. King and 
W. Richards, leaders, selected squad; 
physiological stimulation, C. Yetter 
and J. Qulgg, leaders, performed by 
Sophomores; speed, H. Singer ar.d 
M. Cooper, leaders, performed by 
Freshmen; grace, E. Bailey, U. 
Langkammer and I. Zarfoss, lead- 
ers, performed by Seniors; agility, 
J. Shields, W. Ryan and J. Doyle, 
leaders, performed by Sophomores; 
skill, P. Mazza, D. White and P. 
Weigle, leaders, performed by 
Juniors; endurance, M. Genner and 
H. Slaughter, leaders, selected 
squad; rhythm, J. Kenny and M. 
Free, leaders, performed by Seniors. 



Among the most interesting ex- 
hibitions were the relay race in the 
speed test, and the hurdle race. In 
which Jim McLaughlin demonstrat- 
ed beautiful technique; the fencing 
matches and boxing exhibitions in 
the skill test; the lifting stunts in 
the strength test; the high bar bal- 
ancing in the agility test, and the 
numerous apparatus acts in the en- 
durance test. 

Franklin Disslnger gave a splen- 
did exhibition on the flying rings, 
as did Walter Boyle, "Bun" John- 
son, Paul Hawk and others. Moe 
penner on the parallel bars, Weigle 
and Lafell on the high bar, Koomar 
in-tumbling', and Flocco in the div- 
ing exhibition were all in excellent 
form. 

, Next Friday night, the girls of 
the Health Ed department will give 
their annual demonstration. 



MEWS GYM EXHIBITION 

On Friday, March 1932, the men of 
the Physical Education Department gave 
their annual Demonstration to a full audi- 
ence in the Ehinger Gymnasium. Design- 
ed to bring out the values of physical 
education, the program included gym- 
nastics, calisthenics, fencing, boxing, 
diving, and performance on the side 
horse, parallel bars, high bar and flying 
rings. Some of the star performers were 
Dissinger, Boyle, Johnson, Hawk on the 
rings, Genner on the parallel bars, Weigle 
and Lafell on the high bar, Koomer in 
tumbling, and Flocco in the diving ex- 
hibition. 

13 MARCH 1932 

COLLEGE GRADS 

BACK IN TOWN 

Many Former Students of Teachers 

College Enjoy Big Show in 

Gymnasium. 

Scores and scores of former stu- 
dents of the State Teachers College, 
this place, came back to town last 
night, to attend the annual dem- 
onstration of the activity program 
in the Physical Education Depart- 
ment, by the young men. Among the 
visitors were Miss Myrtle Potteiger, 
of Shllllngton; Andrew Bowdle, 
Charles Cunningham, Leo Atkinson. 
Joe George, Charles Cox, Herbert 
Pearl, George Roscoe, Francis 
Tweed, Harry Donald, Samuel B. 
Morrison, Wilbur Schopf, Morris 
Singer, Worley Deakins, Matt. 
Minch. Of the former teachers in 
the Health Education Department 
was Mrs. Bernlce Mueller Ball, of 
"Five Beeches," Milltown. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 165 



19 MARCH 1932 



COLLEGE GIRLS 
IN GYM EXHIBIT 

Health and Physical Educa- 
tion Department Show 
Skills on Floor. 



COMPETITION KEEN 

Senior-Freshmen defeated the 
Junior-Sophomores last night at. 
the annual Girls' Gymnastic Meet 
In Ehinger gymnasium. State 
Teachers College. The score, 35 to 
31, was meted out by a committee of 
women, judges after an eight-part 
program of songs and cheers, 
marching, dancing, apparatus work. 
stunts and tumbling, and relay rac- 
ing, In which both joint groups per- 
formed creditably to a packed house. 
The meet was promoted by the De- 
partment of Health and Physical 
Education, under the supervision of 
Miss Anna M. Schaub, Miss Gladys 
Bowen, Miss Janlece Goodwin, Miss 
Myra I. Wade, Miss Muriel Leach, 
Miss Eleanor Aldworth and others 
of the Health Education Depart- 
ment faculty. Senior committees 
were In direct charge of the stunts. 

Forty Senior and Freshman girls 
were matched against an equal 
number of Junior and Sophomore 
girls In every event of the program 
except one, a non-competitive spe- 
cialty number, consisting of several 
original clog dances, a fencing ex- 
hibition, and combination exercises 
on the side-horse, given by a group 
of Senior girls. 

The competitive program was 
opened with a song, "Cheer for W. 
C. S. T. C," given by the Senior- 
Freshmen under the leadership of 
Sue Yeager, which won the Judges' 
verdict over the Junior-Soph retali- 
ation, "On to Victory." In the cheer 
contest, however, the Junior-Soph 
girls turned the tables and won 
from their opponents. They were 
led by Zora Fasnacht and Dorothy 
Derk; the Senior-Freshmen were 
led by Helen Gordon and Elizabeth 
Mattsy. 

A beautiful exhibition of march- 
ing, which ended in the forming of 
the letters SF, won the decision 
for the Senior-Freshmen in that 
part of the program. Elizabeth 
Swartz led the Senior-Freshmen, 
while Jean Saylor led the op- 
posers. 

An apparatus test was divided as 
follows: Siflehorse, parallel bars 
and elephant jump won by Senlor- 
Frcshmsn, total of 6 points; flying 
rings and high jump, won by 
Junior-Sophomores, totar of 4 
points. 

Junior-Sophomores, under the 
leadership of Adalcne Whitrsel, 
won the pyramid stunt over the 
Senior-Freshmen, led by Ann Cun- 
ningham. With the score 21-19 
against them, the Junior-Sophs 
then came forward tr seize first 
honors in clog dancing and the 
Irish folk danc3. v.'hich gave them 
a 29-21 advantage. 



department nf ^calth ana ipbjjstcal JxJrucaiian- 

jiiate ©eadjers College 

3$est CLfCBter, $a. 



GIRLS' GYMNASIUM MEET 



March 18, 1932 



Ehinger Gymnasium 



at eight o'clock 



SENIORS AND FRESHMEN 

Vs. 

JUNIORS AND SOPHOMORES 



PROGRAM 

Song — 5 Points 

Senior Leader Sue Yeager 

JuDior Leader Zora Fasnacht 

Cheer — 5 Points 

Senior and Freshman Leaders .... Helen Gordon and Elizabeth Mattey 
Junior and Sophomore Leaders Zora Fasnacht and Dorothy Derk 

II 
Marching — 10 Points 

Senior Leader Elizabeth Swartz 

Junior Leader Jean Saylor 

111 

Apparatus — 10 Points 

Pyramids — 10 Points 

Freshman Leader Ann Cunningham 

Sophomore Leader Adalene Whitesel 

V 
Dancing — 10 Points 

Seniors — A. Clogging - On Deck B. Folk Dancing - Sorrentina (Chalif) 
Juniors — A. Clogging - Reuben B. Folk Dancing - Irish Lilt 

VI 

Specialty Number — Seniors (not competitive) 

A. Original clog dances — B. Fencing — C. Combination exercises on the horse 

VII 
Stunts and Tumbling — 10 Points 

Senior Leaders Elizabeth Flinchbaugh, Helen Diffendafer 

Junior Leader Marion Wettrick 

VIII 
Relay Races — 6 Points 

A. Roller Skating — B. Stilt Race — C. Torch Race 

Senior Committees in charge of the Meet 

Chairman and Announcer - Virginia Wells 

Song, Cheer, and Dancing - Sue Yeager, Katherine Kuhns 

Marching - Helen Gordon, Elizabeth Swartz 

Pyramids - Eleanor Kressley, Mercy Smith 

Apparatus - Margaret Keller, Vircinia Wells 

Stunts and Tumbling - Helen Dtffendafer, Elizabeth Flinchbauch 

Relay Races - Lois Dieffenbacher, Adonia Lechthaler 

Junior Representative - Anna McBride — Sophomore Representative - Ruth Sprenkle 

Freshman Representative - Dorothy Yanisch 

The Senlor-Frosh won the stunts threw victory in the lap oi tne 

and tumbling contest under the Senior-Freshmen. The latter won 

leadership of Elizabeth Flinch- tne ro u er skating and stilt race, 

baugh and Helen Diffendafer. while the Junior-Sophs took the 

Junior-Sophs were led by Marlon torch race. 

Wettrick, and gave a good per- miss Virginia Wells, Senior, 

formance. , served as chairman and announcer 

Excitement mounted high In a during the program, 
roller-rlcatlng, stilt and torch race 
which climaxed the program, and 



166 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



A PROG-RAK 0? DA1 T CI176 
presented by 

Students ar.d Faculty of 
the 
Department of Health and Physical Education 

April 30, 1932. 8:15 o'clock. 

NATURAL DAITCES 

Giga ---------------- Corelli 

Waltz ---------------- C-odowgVy 

The Fountain ------------- Arranged 

In the Fields ------------- Coleridge-Taylor 

The dawn of a new day brings new work which 
ends only with the sun's last rays. 

The Fairy Thorn Tree -____-__ Sibelius 

(From an old Ulster 3alla.d by Sir Thomas Fergusen) 

" And those who dance ' neath the Fairy Them 
Must lose their fairest ere breah of morn" 

Furioso --------------- C-ounod. 

FOLK AITD CHARACTER DAITCES 

Fanshy --------------- Chalif 

Spanish Dance Hoszkowski 

Kate Greexiaway Polls. ---------- Serova 

Cheer Leaders ------------- Frost 

Kopal: (Russian) ________ Chalif 

CLOG DANCES 

Country Dance ------------- Frost 

The Raw Recruit ------------ Frost 

Old Dutch -------------- Frost 

Waltz Tap -------------- Arranged 

Di::ie ---__-__-_----- Frost 

2 MAY 1932 

who are premier devotees and ex- The opening dances were the 

DANCERS PLEASE ponents of the terpsichorean art. extremely enchanting natural 

l/nilVLfiiu l iaunuu entertained a large concourse of dances, that portrayed marked 

A T TUC fAI I E/T students and townsfolks, on Satur- ability by the groups who partici- 

Al lull LUlLluL day evening, in the Philips Me- pated, the initial number being 

Entertaining; Program Put on by mortal Chapel, with a program of Giga (Corellil by sixteen agile girls 

Talented Group. dancing arranged and presented in who cavorted in varied pleasing 

' a trio of interesting classifications: movements, and then followed a 

Faculty Students Take Part In natural dances, folk and character waltz movement by Miss Anna M. 

Numbers Which Please Large dances and clog dances. All were Schaub, Miss Gladys Bowen. Miss 

Audience. were greatly enjoyed by the large Myra I. Wade, of the faculty, and 

A score or so of State Teachers assemblage, who liberally applaud- Miss Sue Yeager, student. "The 

College girls, representing the fac- ed performers. Fountain" was a decidedly pretty 

ulty and the senior and Junior The accompanists were William arrangement in which eight danc- 

classes of the Health Education Springer and Millard Newton, the ers delighted the audience in an 

Department at the college, and latter at the pipe-organ. ir; .i^ative dance. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 167 




FEBRUARY 1933 



EXHIBITION GIVEN big show start! ) P.li. 

by teacheks 

GYM TEAM 



The health and physical education department at 
West Chester State Teachers College has decided to out on its 
annual demonstration in the fore of a circus. 

The circus will be opened with a grand parade, 
led oy a genuine band of circus calibre, after which the ring- 
master will step into the rine and announce with icniliar sten- 
torian tones, the acts which are to follow on the program. Among 
other dazzling stunts will be animal acts, clever aerial per- 
formances, comical clown stunts, wonderful pyramids, and beau- 
tiful ballet dances. 

Peanuts, popcorn and candy will be on sale at a 
small price while the performance ,r;oes on. A2>1 of tn: s will turn 
the Ehinger gynrnastran into a "Big Top" on the evenings of Uarch 
17th and 18th. The admission price is 25 cents for the big show. 

You are cordially invited to be present when the 



The S. T. U. gym team strutted its 
stuff at the Unionville Consolidated 
School on Friday afternoon, and made 
a fine showing. The purpose of the 
demonstration was fourfold: 

1. To demonstrate clog, tap, and 
folk dancing. 

2. To stimulate interest in physi- 
cal education through apparatus 
work: 

3. To set an ideal for the newiy 
formed gym team at the Unionville 
Consolidated School. 

4. To amuse the spectators to 
stunts and games. 

Everyone who participated per- 
formed his task with skill and ease. 
The program and participants are as 
follows : 

1. Junior Dance — "Irish Lill" — 
Thompson, A. Brown, H. Brown, 
Unger, Flocco, Dissinger, Godsall, 
Strayer, and Martin. 

2. High bar act — Godsall, Thomp- 
son, Lafel, Ebbeke, Conrad, Mc- 
Laughlin, and Martin. 

3. Parallel Bars— Lafel, Ebbeke, 
Estlack, McLaughlin, Godsall, Stray- 
er, Thompson, A. Brown, H. Brown, 
Hawk, and Koomar. 

4. Rings — Hawk, Strayer, Ebbeke, 
Dissinger, Godsall, Conrad, and H. 
Brown. 

5. Senior Dance — "On Deck," en- 
core, "School Days" — Kearnan, Koo- 
mar, Snoke, Estlack, Lafel, and 
Hawk. Kearnan and Koomar each 
did a solo dance. 

6. Finale — Fumbling. Everyone 
took part. 

Coach Waters was well pleased 
with the performance of his proteges, 



HAEHY R. ALL3E 
DIPoCTOR 0? ESALTH AITD 
P T ~T3ICAL EDUCATION EHFABTHEHT 



20 MARCH 1933 



COLLEGE "CIRCUS" 

4S REPEATED 

Health Education Students Please 
Audience on Saturday Night; 

Gymnasium Well Filled. 
The second presentation of the 
"big cire.us" by the students of the 
Physical and Health Education 
Department of the West Chester 
State Teachers College, on Satur- 
day night, under the management 
of Dr. Harry R. Allen, head of the 
department, assisted by Miss Mu- 
riel Leach. ..Miss Mvra Wade. Coach 
Earl Waters, and other teachers of 
the Health Education Department, 
again attracted another large gath- 
ering of residents of this place and 
nearby, once more filling the 
Ehinger gymnasium to its capacity, 
and several hundred persons were 
unable to gain admission. 

The music by the college band 
was of first-class order and was 
much appreciated and enjoyed by 
the big audience. 

The grand entree of all the var- 
ied animals, performers, etc.. was 
intensely interesting, under the di- 
rection of Paul Hawk, the efficient 
ringmaster. 



The long program of events, in- 
cluded the animal acts, clever per- 
formances on the parallel bars, 
flying rings and aerial bar. etc.: 
many clown stunts, too numerous 
to mentiou, the organ-grinder, bi- 
cycle built for two, . boxing bouts, 
tight-rope walkers, the strong 
man, etc.; the wonderful pyramids 
and tumbling; beautiful ballet 
dances. 

The event that won most ap- 
plause was the fancy skating, on 
rollers, by eight pretty girls of the 
Junior Class — poetry of motion. 

Ten maidens of the Junior Class 
also entertained with a fascinating 
hoop-dance, while groups of girls 
contributed the dance of the 
jockeys, and the charming ballet. 

One of the thrillers was the ex- 
citing chariot race, the chariots be- 
ing drawn by teams of bare-legged 
girls. 

Throughout the two-hour show, 
a bevy of girls and some of the 
grotesquely-attired clowns, sold 
peanuts, lemonade. ice cream 
cones to the spectators. 

The concluding number was a 
series of acts of skill and daring 
by a class of young men and wom- 
en. 



168 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



18 MARCH 1933 



18 MARCH 1933 



1 500 Crowd College Gym To 
Witness Big Student Circus 

Health Education Department Stages Two-Hour Perfor- 
mance Which Thrills Spectators — Dr. Harry R. 
Allen Directs "Show" Under "Big Top." 



Two hundred and fifty rolling, 
rollicking, jumping gymnasts liter- 
ally turned Ehinger Gymnasium, 
at the State Teachers College, here, 
into a "big top," last night, as the 
Health Education Department pre- 
sented its annual physical culture 
exhibition after the best manner of 
Messrs. Bamura and Bailey, and 
the Ringling Brothers. 

They called it a circus. It was all 
of that. The more than 1500 people 
who packed the hall realistically 
experienced every known thrill of 
the sawdust ring— from pachyderms 
to peanuts, and from pink tights 
to lemonade of the same color. 
ecTwith a cnanor, race, icmuiiw-cui, 
of Ben Hur and Circus Maximus. 
Teams of four girls were "lashed" 
into a canter that sent the two- 
wheeled vehicles careening merrily 
around the ring. 

CLOUD STEPPERS. 

The Cloud Stsppers, a corps of 25 
men, were introduced in perforances 
on the parallel bars and ladder, after 
which the Dancing Horses occupied 
the roped-off enclosure. The 'horses' 
were grotesque creatures formed by 
the students. To the slow strains 
of "The Old Gray Mare," played by 
the Purple and Gold Band, they 
scraped and shuffled in an amusing 
manner. Similar 'animals' — includ- 
ing an elephant, a donkey, an os- 
trich, and other creatures — were 
formed by clever imitation, and used 
in a nummer of really funny acts. 
FEATS OF MAGIC. 

Miss Ruth Byler, dressed In the 
guise of Howard Thurston, perform- 
ed some feats of magic that were 
more humorous than mystifying. 
Miss Fleta Fox played "Cab Callo- 
way," and drew down a shower of 
applause for her clever imitation 
of the colored conductor's rhytlimic 
antics before the microphone in 
"Kicking the Gong Around." 

Rome very good tap dancing was 



In a steady series of perfor- 
mances lasting more than two 
hours, the gymnasts — both men and 
women students of the Health Edu- 
cation Department — indulged in al- 
most every manoeuver possible on 
the mats, the parallel bars, the 
horizontal bar, and the flying rings. 
Skating, dancing, tumbling, and 
most of the orthodox acrobatics of 
the circuit performers, were pre- 
sented by a galaxy of supple men 
and maedchens— in uniform! And 
every act of the center ring was 
burlesqued hilariously by clowns 
who were really clownish. 
The whole show, from start to 
f,dward Dnger, showed that they 
knew a thing or two about the, 
business. 

CLOWN ACTS. 

Among the various clown acts 
done outside the main ring, the best 
were a boxing match, a bicycle built 
for two, the organ grinder, and the 
strong man act. Several genuine 
feats of strength were performed in 
the main ring. 

The Circus came to an end with 
a finale tumbling act, featuring four 
men and three girls. Gus Lafel and 
Miss Muriel Jones did some splen- 
did feats on the mats in this num- 
ber, displaying strength, balance, 
and remarkable agility. 

No casualties occurred through- 
out the entire program, and not a 
single hitch of any kind could be 
charged up against the trainers or 
the performers. The gym was beau- 
tifully decorated for the occasion, 
and music was furnished by the 
Purple and Gold Band, under the 
direction of La Verne E. Irvine. 



TO STAGE CIRCUS 
AT COLLEGE GYM 

Mr IE ±33- 

Animal Acts, Pyramids, 
Dances and Other Fea- 
tures Scheduled for 
This Evening. 

Instead of the usual annual 
demonstration of physical training, 
the students of the Physical and 
Health Education Department, at 
the West Chester State Teachers 
College, under the management of 
Dr. Harry B. Allen. Director of 
Sports and Head of the Health 
Education Department, will pre- 
sent to the public in the Ehinger 
Gymnasium, tonight and Saturday 
night, a great big show, in the na- 
ture of a circus, which will open 
with a grand parade, led by a gen- 
uine band of the circus calibre. 
There will be a ringmaster and 
numerous wonderful animals that 
will perform astonishing tricks, 
comical' clowns in dazzling stunts, 
clever aerial performances, marvel- 
ous pyramids, and beautiful and 
stunning ballet dances, by a big 
troupe of beauties. 

Among the varied events will be 
animal acts, the dances, pyramids, 
the high elephant, the clowns and 
the jockeys, fancy skating on rollers, 
tumbling acts by young women and 
men; with tight-rope walkers, the 
Siamese twins, duck hunt, baseball 
stunt, the monkey and the organ 
grinder, four-handed men and 
women, bicycle built for two, rid- 
ing the donkey, the strong man. 
boxing exhibition, the ostrich and 
the clown act, hoop race, baseball, 
etc. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 169 





170 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



24 MARCH 1933 



mkmkkks of hkaltii k1h cation 

dkpaktmknt chlkkkatk in 

anm'al festival 

Several Hundred Disappointed People Refused Admission As Gymnasts 
Give Exhibiuoii Of Their Versatility Before An Enthusiastic Audi- 
ence Of Two Thousand Town-folk And Student Spectators. 

DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTORS PRAISED FOR ORGANIZATION 



Pink lemonade, ferocious animals, 
tumblers, aerialists, peanuts, freaks, 
strong men. clowns, clowns, clowns, 
bands playing, laughter, excitement, 
crowds and crowds of people! It 
could mean but one Jiing — the circus 
had come to town. Whose circus, 
Barnura and Bailey's? Of course not! 
It was our own Health Education 
Department's circus, positively and 
without a doubt the "biggest show on 
earth!" 

For many weeks, with the air 
charged with suppressed excitement, 
careful preparation had been going 
on for the stupendous climax achiev- 
ed last Friday and Saturday nights 
under "the Big Top" at Rdsedale and 
Church Streets. Whispered reports, 
gorgeous costumes peeping out from 
under coats as performers scampered 
across the campus to rehearsal, 
stunts rehearsed wherever a group of 
"Health Eds" happened to come to- 
gether, all these and many other 
peeks behind the scenes caused rumor 
to be rampant and expectations to 
run high. " Just what did all this 
mean?" What did the Health Educa- 
tion department have up its sleeve? 
The answer to these questions was, 
"Come and see." And so, with high 
anticipations we "came and saw." 

We were luckier in this respect 
than some three hundred others who 
came but did not see. Although the 
show was not scheduled to start until 
8:00 P. M.. the house was packed at 
7:15 and it was estimated that be- 
tween 250 and 300 were turned away. 
Including the extra bleachers and 
chairs, the house seated over a thou- 
sand and thus in two nights the per- 
formance was viewed by more than 
2.000 people. 

We had scarcely gotten accustomed 
to six inches of bleacher which ap- 
peared upon the insistance of a velvet 
clad usher, when the band struck up 
a lively tune which set feet to tapping. 
Peanuts, clowns, ice cream, lemonade 
appeared. Promptly at 8 P. M. the 
ring-master, himself, none other than 



Paul Hawk, booted, spurred, tall- 
hatted and with whip in hand, step- 
ped into the center of the ring and 
the show began in earnest. 

First, of course, came the parade, 
and what a parade. At the crack of 
the ring-master's whip there trouped 
into the ring such a swarm and 
variety of animal life as has seldom 
been seen collected under one roof. 
Everything from the sublime to the 
ridiculous was represented. Beautiful 
maidens danced gaily at the heels of 
the lordly elephant; clowns frolicked 
and cart-wheeled; charioteers re- 
strained prancing steeds; bears and 
monkeys tumbled over each other. 
Yes, indeed, it was a parade of 
parades. 

Then, as if by magic, the ring war, 
cleared and the first featured act 
was ready. A chariot race ! Two 
gaily colored chariots drawn by 
thoroughbreds careened furiously 
around the ring. Whips cracked; 
dust flew, and the betting was just 
beginning to warm up when the win- 
ner was announced. Perhaps it is 
just as well that it did end that way 
because someone said that the race 
was "in the bag" from the start. 

The second big act was put on by 
the Junior men and consisted of 
pyramid building. It received well 
deserved applause. 

Next came an animal act which 
(believe it or not), was put on entire- 
ly by Junior girls. It featured a pair 
of boxing apes, an exceedingly learn- 
ed elephant and a horse dance to 
which the audience responded with a 
"horse laugh." 

Then, out rolled a set of parallel 
bars piled high with mats and the 
Sophomore men went into their 
famous high elephant act. Taking 
off from a spring-board each por- 
former swaned or somersaulted over 
the elephant with matchless grace 
and minimum of broken bones. Their 
act was very well received. 

The next three acts were dances. 
The first was a ballet dance by the 
Senior girls, then a clown dance by 



lunior men and a jockey dance by 
Senior women. 

Following this, mats were brought 
ut and the women were given a turn 
t building pyramids. Strength as 
•ell as agility and grace combined to 
reate very artistic effects. 

Next came more dances; a hoop 
ance by girls, a hilarious esthetic 
jmedy dance by men (in case you 

dn't know it) and a Cab Calloway 

nice. 

And so we come to one of the high 
lights of the evening — the aerial act. 
The frying rings and the horizontal 
bar were let down and many hair- 
raising feats of strength and daring 
were performed upon them, by such 
luminaries as Ebbecke, Conard. God- 
sail, Ramsay, Johnson, Anderson, H. 
Brown, Koomar, Strayer, A. Brown, 
and Estlack. Dissinger achieved im- 
mortal fame by doing a "double cut 
off" and a "flyaway" blindfolded, 
which just about turned the audience 
on its ear. However, the side-split- 
ting antics of Flocco, Unger, and 
Laffe! men brought it around n nor- 
mal. 

The next act belonged entirely to 
the Freshmen men. It was called 
"the strong man act." and that very 
aptly describes it. One spectacular 
feat was the one in which Earl Fuoss 
supported a large, heavy rock upon 
his chest as it was being smashed to 
bits with a sledge. 

Following a fancy skating act by 
Junior girls, came the final perform- 
ance of the evening, a mixed tumbling 
act which was very spectacular and 
effective, starring Jones, Hawk, 
Unger and Laffel. 

The Health Education Department, 
teachers and students alike, are to be 
congratulated upon putting on a 
show which packed the house and 
turned people away for two nights in 
a row. For one thing only can they 
claim no credit, and that is the 
splendid work of the band which gave 
life and color to the whole perform- 
ance. Mr. Zimmer. Mr. Irvine and 
the band worked as hard as anyone 
for the success of the show and de- 
serve their share of credit. 

Miss Aldworth and Miss Bowen 
who had charge of the dancing are 
also to be congratulated, but. not 
wishing to take more than their 
share of credit, they wish it to be 
known that in several cases the stu- 
dents, themselves, originated the 
dance they used. 

Lastly, Coach Westcott did a big 
job well, as chairman of the property 
committee. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 171 



6 JANUARY 1934 



JANUARY 10, 1934 

W. A. A. AND VALKYRIE 
CLUBS SPONSOR RECITAL 



A Pro ~ran of Dancing 
presented by 



Modern Dance Presented Before 
College (Audience 



The W. A. A. and Volkyrie Clubs, 
aided by the Men's Junior Health 
Education Dancing Class, enter- 
tained the college in the first Satur- 
day night entertainment of the year. 
All combined in presenting a dance 
recital of high calibre. 

For the first time many' college 
students were given the opportun- 
ity to observe an interprelation of 
the„.modern trends in dancing. A 
well-selected group of tap and clog 
dancers and a series of merry folk 
dances completed the program. 

The modern dance, new to the 
dancing world, was presented by 
the Junior and Senior Hfealth Edu- 
cation women in a group of original 
forms.- The program was a follows: 

I. Original patterns with per- 
cussion accompaniment. 

II. Original patterns with piano 
"In the Fields" — Coleridge Taylor. 
Next on the program was a group 

of tap and clog dances, which are 
always pQpular on a dance program. 
In this group the clogging classes 
of W. A. A. took part, aiding the 
Junior and Senior Health Educa- 
tion women. This consisted of: 

1. Reuben Taps. 

2. Railroad. 

3. Buck Routine. 

4. Cornfield. 

5. Waltz Clog. 

6. Georgian Quartet. 

7. Arithmetic. 

The last group was one of popu- 
lar folk dances of some of the gay 
countries of Europe. The men of 
the Junior Health Education Danc- 
ing class entered into this with the 
Senior Health Education women. 
The series danced: 

1. Csebogar Hungarian 

2. Kaca Czechoslocakian 

3. Gathering Peascods . . English 

4. Seven Jumps Swedish 

5. Sweet Kate Engliish 

6. Jauko Czechoslovakian 

7. Sellenger's Round . . English 
The entire performance was ac- 
companied by Kay Hartzell. The 
well-balance program and the first 
appearance of the modern dances 
were the result of the combined ef- 
forts of Miss Schaub, Miss Wade 
and Miss Leach, advisors of the 
Valkyrie and W. A. A. Clubs. 



The Women's Athletic Association and the Valkyrie Club 

Accompanist 

«, , - -, Kathryn Hartzell 
Modern Dance Forms 

I. Original Patterns with Percussion Accompaniment. 

II. Original Patterns with Piano Accompaniment. 

Waltz Schubert 

Polka Russian Polk Song 

Snycopation Ashton 

"Sand Fun" 

III. Canon Form. 

A contrapuntal composition in the style of strict 
imitation, one part repeating another part at any interval. 

IV. Resultant Rhythms. 

Rhythms which result from the combination of two or 
more distinct and different rhythms. 

V. "In the Fields" Coleridge-Taylor 

Clog and Tap Dancing 

I. Reuben Taps. 

II. Railroad. 

I II. Buck Routine. 

IV. Cornfield. 

V. Waltz Clog. 

VI. Double Quartet. 
VII. Arithmetic. 

Folk Dancing 

I. Csebogar Hungarian 

II. Eaca Czecho-Slovakian 

I I I. Gathering Peascods English 

IV. Seven Jumps Swedish 

V. Sweet Kate English 

VI. Janko Czecho-Slovakian 

VII. Sellenger's Round English 



172 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE - WEST CHESTER, PA MARCH 1, 1934 

PRESIDENTS OFFICE 



ut on its 
"Side Show. 

This show will co 



The Health and Physical Education Departmen 
the West Chester State Teachers College has deci 
to put on its annual demonstration in the form o 



clow 
Am on 
band 
etc. 

and 
invi 

The 



uj.o oiiww WJ.J. cunsist of a number of amusing 
n stunts, acrobatic feats, and other nov 
g these novelties will be the regular Si 
, south of American Sun Dancers, clowns, 



acrobats , 



The show will take place on the evenings of March 23 
24th at the Ehinger Gymnasium. You are cordially 
ted to be present when the show starts at 8:00 p.m. 
tax will be . 25 C . 

Very sincerely yours, 
Norman W. Cameron 
President 



GYMNASTS TRAINING FOR 
EX HIBITION JAUNTS 

Coach Waters' Troupe of Acrobats 

Will Visit In Various Cities of 

the State. 



With the beginning of the" new 
year, we find the West Chester 
gymnasts preparing for a series of 
exhibition jaunts that will take them 
into various parts of the State. 

Having a nucleus of ten letter- 
men, Coach Waters has a fine group 
of all-around stars that perform 
consistently. The team is cap- 
tained by Franklin Dissinger, who 
has starred for the past two years 
on the rings. Included in the letter- 
men and their specialty are: H. 
Brown, horse; C Connard," rings; 
Flocccs tumbling; Geib, piano; Mc- 
Laughlin, parallels; - Thompson, 
ropes; Minger, horse; Wyatt, hori- 
zontal; Doyle, tumbler; Martin, hori- 
zontal bar. 

Among the other men who have 
displayed promise include: Fenton, 
Boyd, Ostroff, Rudolph, White, 
Topping, Deppen, Satterfield. 

The tentative schedule includes 
exhibitions at Harrisburg, Lebanon, 
Norristown and Wilmington. 




Wyatt, Satterfield, A. Brown, White. 

Coach Waters, Doyle, McLaughlin, Martin, Geib, Stampher, Topping, Gwynn. 

L'uger, H. Broun. Thompson. Capt. Dissinger, L. Brown, Fenton, Ostroff. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 173 



QUAD ANGLES 



Health Ed 
Circus 



SENIOR HEALTH ED MEN 
TO GIVE ANNUAL CIRCUS 



WEST CHESTER, PA., MARCH 21, 1934 



NO. 23 



Many New and Novel Features 
Added To Circus Routine; Side- 
show Attractions Gathered 
From Four Corners of 
Earth 



The Senior Health Education men 
will present their annual circus 
side-show on Friday evening, March 

23, and Saturday evening, March 

24, in the Ehinger Gymnasium, at 
7.30 o'clock. 

Some of the great attractions will 
be the clown band, the Central Am- 
erican sun-worshippers, the diving, 
dancing clowns, and the champion 
wrestlers of the world in action. 
Borneo wild men will bandish their" 
native war clubs to a thrilled audi- 
ence. The champion drill team of 
the world will march in exacting 
fashion, the apparatus twins will 
perform their' death-defying stunts, 
the cowpunchers will punch cows, 
and sailors imported direct from the 
high seas will go through their 
reportoire of dangerous antics high 
above the heads of a breathless 
multitude. 

As an added attraction, the Col- 
lege Criterions will furnish the 
music and will open the show with 
some of their lively popular arrange- 
ments. 

In a recent interview, the pompous 
ringmaster proclaimed the show to 
be "stupendous, colossal,- supreme, 
and breath-taking." In fact, if his 
praise is not a bit biased, the per- 
formance has as many great adjec- 
tives as a modern moving_ picture. 
As a last thought, the veteran show- 
man mentioned that the privilege of 
seeing the greatest collection of 
freaks under one tent is one of 
which anyone may avail himself, — 
provided that he has the small sum 
of one quarter, the fourth part of a 
dollar, or twenty-five cents, United 
States currency. 



23 MARCH 1934 

College Health-Eds Stand 
Ready to Display Ability 
At Annual Gymnastic Show 

Coach Earle C. Waters' Men Stage Circus at Ehinger 

Gymnasium to Exhibit Skill. Side Show Will 

Feature Many Novel and Amusing Acts 

The men of the Health Education Department of the 
State Teachers College will present their seventh annual 
demonstration of physical education, tonight, in the 
Ehinger Gym. 

The program, as usual, is staged by the Senior 
Health Education students, coached by Earle C. Waters, 
gymanstic instructor. 

There are fourteen side shows. They start with 
the clown band, led by Arnold Brown, and star such 
famous players as White, Diffenbaugh, Hudicka, Wilson, 
and others. 



Students Strayer, Himes and 
Doyle have turned the Sophs into 
Sun Worshipers of the Aztec race. 
This took much persuasion on their 
part, but finally they converted 20 
of the class, including such no- 
tables as Warvel, Oberle, Steckbeck, 
McNelly, McGlnnis, Swiggett, Puoss 
and others possibly less noted, but 
not less talented. 

The "Tumbling Clowns" were 
created by Senior DeHoff, and they 
sure would make that A&P me- 
chanical man laugh. 

The "Fools on Skates" portray 
the sidewalks of West Chester in 
1936, if this craze for roller skating 
continues. They are worth smiling 
at with their creator Rosenthal. 

"Sailors of the Good Old U. S.,"~ 
by Thompson, provide a few thrills 
on the high ropes. 

Flocco, State low-board diving 
champion, will provide his concep- 
tion of the low-board diving 
champs of 1876. 

The strong boys of the college 
have been collected by "Downing- 
town" Fulton and they present the 
"Steel Muscles of Pa" in a strong 
man act that is difficult. 

The "Assorted Half-Baked Rolls 
of Mother Nature" presents the 
best of the college tumblers in a 
spectacular number by Harry 
Brown. 



Connie Friend's act of "Acrobatic 
Clowns" will make a big hit, as it is 
Different from anything ever shown 
in West Chester. They fall upstairs 
and down, and how they treat fur- 
niture! 

The "Champion Wrestler of the 
World" is another side show attrac- 
tion. It shows how the champ 
lasted until he reached West Ches- 
ter, where he loses his title. This 
act is a mixture of skill and riotous 
fun. Dunmore and Kelly are the 
promoters. 

The last side show will present 
the only apparatus twins in cap- 
tivity. They are clever and beau- 
tiful to see, working on the hori- 
zontal bar, parallel bars, horse and 
rings, doing combinations that only 
an Unger and Dissinger couid con- 
ceive. 

The side shows will run two 
nights, so that all who wish may be 
able to see it. Last year many local 
people failed to get in because of 
the early filling of all available 
space in the Ehrlnger gym. 



174 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 

26 MARCH 1934 EVENING BULLETIN 

Teachers College Troupe 
of Athletes Score a Hit 
in Gymnastic Exhibition 

Annual Circus Carnival At Ehinger Gym Pleases Large 

Crowd in Offering Demonstration By Men of the 

Health Education Department. Second 

Performance Tonight 

"Right this way, ladies and gentlmen ." 

"Let me call your attention to the most spectacular, 
the most stupendous, the most colossal ." 

"Only ten cents, one dime, the tenth part of a dol- 
lar >' 

It was side show time at the State Teachers College, 
here, last night, and the busy barkers barked a bully 
ballyhoo. Ehinger Gymnasium was the "midway; the 
acrobats, the clowns, the death-defying what-have-yous 
of the circus carnival were men students of the Health- 
Education Department of the college, a hundred strong, 
who leaped through the whole category of gymnastical 
entertainment in what, to the public, bore the appearance 
of being a succession of tip-top tent shows, but which 
was whispered about the college campus as being the 
seventh annual demonstration of the Physical Education 
Department. 

Senior Health Education students 
sponsored the show, which was 
coached by Earle C. Waters, in- 
structor in gymnastics. The gym 
was nicely filled with spectators, 
and an equally satisfactory crowd 
is expected for the repeat perform- 
ance tonight. 

In many respects, the demonstra- 
tion was similar to that of last 
year, when ■ a high peak in gym- 
nastic entertainment was* reached 
by the local college. The chief dif- 
ference lay in the exclusion of 
women students from participation 
in the same demonstration with 
the men. Last year, women and 
men were featured together. This 
year, a demonstration by the wom- 
en students of the Health Educa- 
tion Department will be held later. 
The gymnasium was attractively 

decorated with posters and colored 
streamers for the occasion, and 

music was provided by the College 

Criterkms. A clown band, led by 

Arnold M. Brown, provided plenty 

of laughs and discords. Barkers 

for the show, who lustily and ex- 
travagantly advertised each and 

every act of the fourteen separate 

side shows, were Edward Good, 

Ruggerio Flocco, Arnold M. Brown, 

Martin .Kelly and Bill Hickman 
The opening show was an Aztec 

sun dance, in which Sophomore 

students, stripped to the waist, went 

through the prayerful antics of the 

native Indian. The group, dancing 

in a yellow spotlight, was under the 

leadership of Connie Strayer, John 
Doyle and Bill Hlmes, Senior stu- 
dents. 



"Tumbling Clowns" was a hil- 
arious act in which De Hoff, Senior 
leader, directed a corps of fun- 
makers through a. series of clever 
tumbling performances. 

"Fools on Skates" presented more 
clowning. Rosenthal, Senior leader, 
created this roller-skating riot, 
which demonstrated remarkable 
skill and daring on the part of the 
troupers. 

"Sailors of the Good Old TJ. S. 
A." was a more serious presentation, 
directed by Thompson, Senior lead- 
er. Rope-climbing appeared easy 
for these lads, who went hand-over- 
hand like mariners bound for the 
crow's nest. 

One of the best features of the 
whole show was given by the "Div- 
ing Clowns," led by Ruggerio 
Flommo, State low-board dicing 
champion. Excellent tactics, com- 
bined with large doses of • slapstick, 
made this one of the best mlijh- 
provokers of the bill. 

"Steel Muscles of Pennsylvania 
was a good strong-man show, 
by Fulton, Senior student. "' 
Assorted Half-Baker Rolls of Motj 
er Nature" was the best of 
tumbling acts, created by Ha 







Chet Piotrowski 




The Author 

And 

Chet Piotrowski 




Evei 



n? Bulletin March 26, 1934 

A Human Cantilever in the West Chester State Teachers College phv 
sical education demonstration and circus. Herbert Ostroff, of Lansdown 
»nd Samuel Thompson, of Tyrone, in a specialty act called "Clowning, 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 175 



CIRCUS SIDE SHOWS 19 34 

Department of Physical Education 

1. Clown Band - Clown Dances 

2. Central American Sun Worshippers. 

3. Tumbling Clowns 

4. Sailors of the U. S. A. 

5. Diving Clowns 

6. Muscles and Muscles 

7. Mother Natures Rolls 

8. Clown Acrobats and Skaters 

9. Champion Wrestler of the World 
3D. Drill Team Champs. 

11. Cowpuncher's Hoe Down 

12. Borneo Wild Men with War Clubs - 

13. Apparatus Twins 

14. Finally. 



Music: 

Music Orches 
tration: 

Costumes: 

Make Up: 

Publicity: 

Finance: 

Signs: 

Decorations: 

Properties: 

Program: 

Coach of Program: 

Actors: 



Purple & Gold Dance Band 
Director: Paul Zoehler 

Music Department 

Senior Health Education Men 

Mi 8s Barrer 

Mr. A. W. Thompson 

Mr. H. E. Allen 

Mr. Martin Kelly 

Mr. Kenneth Friend, Chairman 

Mr. Howard Wescott 

Senior Health Education Men 

Mr. Earle C. Waters 

Health Education Men 



Music Program 
Before shew - 7:30 - lively musi«. 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



10. 
11. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 



Clown Band - no music 

Central American Indians - ne music 

Clown Tumbling - Laurel and Hardy Entrance Music 

- Auch Der Leiber Augustine. 
Sailors on Hopes - Sailing 
Spring Board Rascals - In the Good Old Summer Time 

- Bicycle Built for Two. 
Steel Muscles of Pa - Waltz on entrance and exit. 
Assorted Rolls - waltz 

Clown Acrobats and Skaters - Skaters Waltz 
Champ Wrestler - Chord after introduction - 

Ho music for first 3 bouts - 

4th bout lively musie - after 5th bout funeral dirge. 
Champion Drill Team - College Boys March - Football Hero 
<5bwboy Hoe Down - Big Corral - Turkey in Straw 

Old GSey Mare 
War Clubs - 

War Clubs Clowns - same as 12 
Apparatus - any waltz. 
Finally - Clown Band 



176 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



24 MARCH 1934 



Teachers College Troupe 
of Athletes Score a Hit 
in Gymnastic Exhibition 

Annual Circus Carnival At Ehinger Gym Pleases Large 

Crowd in Offering Demonstration By Men of the 

Health Education Department. Second 

Performance Tonight 

"Right this way, ladies and gentlmen ." 

"Let me call your attention to the most spectacular, 
the most stupendous, the most colossal ." 

"Only ten cents, one dime, the tenth part of a dol- 
lar ." 

It was side show time at the State Teachers College, 
here, last night, and the busy barkers barked a bully 
ballyhoo. Ehinger "Gymnasium was the "midway;" the 
acrobats, the clowns, the death-defying what-have-yous 
of the circus carnival were men students of the Health- 
Education Department of the college, a hundred strong, 
who leaped through the whole category of gymnastical 
entertainment in what, to the public, bore the appearance 
of being a succession of tip-top tent shows, but "which 
was whispered about the college campus as being the 
seventh annual demonstration of the Physical Education 
Department. 

benior Heaith Education students 
sponsored the show, which was 
coached by Earle C. Waters, in- 
structor in gymnastics. The gym 
was nicely filled with spectators, 
and an equally satisfactory crowd 
is expected for the repeat perform- 
ance tonight. 

In many respects, the demonstra- 
tion was similar to that of last 
year, when a high peak in gym- 
nastic entertainment was reached 
by the local college. The chief dif- 
ference lay in the exclusion of 
women students from participation 
in the same demonstration with 
the men. Last year, women and 
men were featured together. This 
year, a demonstration by the wom- 
en students of the Health Educa- 
tion Department will be held later. 

The gymnasium was attractively 
decorated with posters and colored 
streamers for the occasion, and 
music was provided by the College 
Criterions. A clown band, led by 
Arnold M. Brown, provided plenty 
of laughs and discords. Barkers 
for the show, who lustily and ex- 
travagantly advertised each and 
every act of the fourteen separate 
side shows, were Edward Good, 
Ruggerio Plocco, Arnold M. Brown, 
Martin Kelly and Bill Hickman. 

The opening show was an Aztec 
sun dance, in which Sophomore 
students, stripped to the waist, went 
through the prayerful antics of the 
native Indian. The group, dancing 
in a yellow spotlight, was under the 
leadership of Connie Strayer, John 
Doyle and Bill Himes, Senior stu- 
dents. 



•V..T..T..T..T. 



"Tumbling Clowns" was a hil- 
arious act in which De Hoff, Senior 
leader, directed a corps of fun- 
makers through a series of clever 
tumbling performances. 

"Fools on Skates" presented more 
clowning. Rosenthal, Senior leader, 
created this roller-skating riot, 
which demonstrated remarkable 
skill and daring on the part of the 
troupers. 

"Sailors of the Good Old U. S. 
A." was a more serious presentation, 
directed by Thompson, Senior lead- 
er. Rope-climbing appeared easy 
for these lads, who went hand-over- 
hand like mariners bound for the 
crow's nest. 

One of the best features of the 
whole show was given by the "Div.' 
ing Clowns," led by Ruggerio 
Flommo, State low-board diving 
champion. Excellent tactics, com- 
bined with large doses of slapstick, 
made this one of the best mirth- 
provokers of the bill. 

"Steel Muscles of Pennsylvania" 
was a good\ strong-man show, led 
by Fulton, Senior student. "The 
Assorted Half-Baker Rolls of Moth- 
er Nature" was the best of the 
tumbling acts, created by Harry 
Brown. 

"Acrobatic Clowns," created by 
Connie Friend, was a new and sen- 
sational flip-flop act, in which the 
performers showed real skill plus 
the ability to "take it." 

A burlesque wrestling act, which 
incidentally revealed a few of the 
stratagems of the mat, was pro- 
moted by Dunmore and Kelly. 




Return Engagement 

The 1934 Version 
of the 1933 Success! 

Staged by the SENIOR PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION MEN of West 
Chester State Teachers College. 

* The World's Greatest * 

Side Show 

Stupendous! Thrilling! 
Mirth Provoking! 

Presenting Acrobats, 
Clowns, Jugglers 

Wild Animals Fortune Tellers 

Plan to Get Your Tickets Early 

Remember the 1933 Crowd! 

EHINGER GYM 

West Chester State Teachers College 

FRIDAY Ma 8^f 4 SATURDAY 

r 







Tickets (25c) Now 
at College Office 



88 



oiner presentations were, •'Comic 
Drill Team," under Good and 
Forbes; "Cowpunchers' Hoe-Down," 
promoted by Diffenbaugh and Fen- 
ton; and the "Wild Men of Bor- 
neo," who weren't so wild after aH, 
but co-ordinated nicely in an In- 
dian club drill, arranged by Free- 
land, Baldwin and Kurtzman. 

The closing act presented the 
"Apparatus Twins," led by Eddie 
Unger and Fred Dissinger, who did 
some clever and beautiful work on 
the sidehorse, parallel bars, the 
horizontal bar and the flying rings. 

In the grand finale, every per- 
former on the evening's program 
joined in the parade around the 
arena, amid the cheers of the spec- 
tators. The demonstration was one 
of the best ever presented at the 
local college, and the program was 
a long and thrilling one. It will be 
repeated tonight. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 177 





APPARATUS PYRAMIDS BY SENIOR HEALTH EDUCATION STUDENTS 





MAT PYRAMIDS BY SOPHOMORE HEALTH EDUCATION STUDENT. 





Chant 



Sustenvto 




y- 




fT'-tJ 



Force -ti*sim< 




Sw .. 









l»f 



lit 



Broad cr«st*rwio 



178 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Mvra Wade, A. Thompson, Harry Allen, Earle Waters, Muriel Leach, Eleanore AUUvorth 

Demonstration School MAY MY FESTIVAL I-&y 10, 1934 

1. Processional 

Entrance of the Queen 

2. Dance of the Spring Fairies 

Kindergarten Children 

3. Singing Games - grades 1, 2, 3. 

How D'ye do, my partner 
Oats, Peas, Beans 

4. Polk Dances - grade 5 girls 

Csebogar (Hungarian) 
Crested Hen (Danish) 

5. Tumbling and Pyramids - grade 6 boys 

6. Singing Games - grades 1, 2, 3, 

Jolly is the Miller 

Go Round and Round the Village 

7. Tumbling and Pyramids - grades 7-8 girls 

8. Sword Dance - grades 7-8 boys 

9. Scarf Dance - grade 6 girls 

Note: All tumbling interludes - grade 4 boys 

10. Crowning of the Queen 

11. May Day Song 

12. May Pole Dance - grades 4-5 boys and girls 

13. Recessional 



12 MARCH 1935 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 179 
19 MARCH 1935 



COLLEGE CIRCUS 
IS NEARLY READY 

Three Hundred Performers 
Are Rehearsing for 30 
Major Acts of Ath- 
letic Show. 

Intensive preparation for the 
West Chester State Teachers Col- 
lege's most extensive athletic show 
—the annual Indoor Circus, to be 
staged March 21, 22 and 23— con- 
tinued at a Barnum &. Baily pace 
in the Clyde E. Ehinger gymnasium, 
here, yesterday afternoon. 

Three hundred performers, a cast 
that includes every member or 
both men's and girls' Health and 
Physical Education Departments, 
rehearsed their parts in some thirty 
odd major acts yesterday, and be- 
cause several sections did not 
come up to the general excellence 
of the Circus as a unit, there is an- 
other full show practice this after- 
noon. It will be a strictly closed 
rehearsal. Director Earl C. Waters 
announced. 

"The show, as originally planned, 
will take close to three hours,'' 
Coach Waters said. "Our present 
difficulty is getting a continuous 
performance throughout without 
breaking the Interest in necessary 
changes of scenery, costuming, etc. 
Yesterday's rehearsal took close to 
lour hours, and rather than cut any 
of the individual acts we must step 
up the work of stage hands, etc." 

From the advance notices, this 
year's Circus will employ three 
rings, the two end plots being used 
for minor gymnastic work and 
small group drills, and the center 
ring for the main act. There will be 
continuous action in all three 
rings, permitting every Circus-goer 
a close-up of at least one division 
of the show. 

It was the getting of one set of 
actors in and out of their respective 
rings promptly that proved to be 
yesterday's problem and an old Cir- 
cus secret that the Teachers nave 
not as yet learned. Perfect timing 
is essential and Director Waters 
feels tne difficulty can be corrected 
only with show-length rehearsals. 

Be that as it may. the West Ches- 
ter Circus cannot help but be the 
most extensive and inclusive show 
ever attempted in this section. 
Every conceivable Circus idea has 
been woi'Ked out, by more than a 
dozen different committees, in re- 
spect lo the local Physical Educa- 
tion work. Acrobatics, trapeze work, 
and gymnastics, of course, is right 
down the College's main street, and 
i.i execution. Director Waters is 
willing to put his men against those 
ol a professional circus, a '.ribute 
to their work. 



While last night's prevue might 
have been billed "For Actors Only," 
it was th3 night of nights for elec- 
tricians, stage managers, make-up 
experts, and crstume out-fitters. 
The rings have been pitched, the 
exclusive c?nter circle measuring 
35 feet in diameter, permitting 
mass occupation for the twelve fea- 
ture acts. An amplification system 
has been installed, and band plat- 
form erected. Even the ventila- 
tion system was tested. 

The real achievement of the eve- 
ning, however, was scored by the 
committee in charge of costuming 
the entire show. Every actor and 
actress will appear in appropriate 
circus attire, arrangements having 
been worked out through the aid of 
a well-known New York stock com- 
pany. 

The show, according to rings in 
which the acts appear, includes: 

Ring One— Act 1, Wild Animals; 
Act 2, Midgets; Act 3, Clown mir- 
rors; Act 4, Floating Body and 
Bomb act; Act, Clown dances; Act 
6, Football; Act 7, Rollicking danc- 
ing dolls; Act 8, Girls' basketball 
game; Act 9, Coffin number; Act 10, 
Centipede and trained seals. 

Center Ring— Act 1, General an- 
nouncements and introductions by 
Raymond Kantz, master of cere- 
monies; Act 2, Grand parade; Act 
3, Mixed pyramid building; Act 4, 
Novelty apparatus work; Act 5, 
Women's apparatus work; Act fi. 
Continental folk dances; Act 7, the 
Walking Giants: Act 8, Amsterdam 
Skating and Sleighng scene; Act 9, 
Men's apparatus work; Act 10. Hill- 
bililies of West Virginia and tap- 
dancing; Act 11, Statues; Act 12, 
Tumbling. 

Ring Three— Act 1, Clown pyra- 
mids; Act 2, Burlesque on Crime; 
Act 3. East Sides Specialty Dance; 
Act 4. Clown photography; Act 5, 
the Wild Horse and Rider; Act 6] 
Golf; Act 7, Juggling; Act 8, Clown 
fencing; Act 9. the Hill-billy 
clowns; Act 10, Clown statues. 



FULL REHEARSAL 
OF COLLEGE SHOW 

Athletic CircuS' Performers 

Go Through Entire 

Routine of Coming 

Exhibition. 

Tensed for its "first night" per- 

^1-1^^6 Thursday night, the 
est Chester State T %£iers Col- 
lege Indoor Circus troV * of 300 
performers rehearsed with all the 
last-minute precision and color of 
a Barnum and Bally "Big Show" 
In their Ehinger gymnasium "tent," 
here, last night. 

It was apparent the Teachers, in 
their latest attempt to stage the 
biggest athletic show in the history 
of West Chester, were a little ex- 
cited over the enormity and stu- 
pendlty of their own handiwork. 
Rehearsing together as a sustained 
performance for the first time, the 
.troupers had the first opportunity 
to witness the work of their fellow- 
actors and to be judged in their 
own efforts. 

Words of praise and congratula- 
tion followed practically every act 
in one of the busiest evenings ever 
known to the Ehinger gym. Bar- 
ring brief interruptions by elec- 
tricians, property men, stage hands, 

and, yes — circus louts — last night's 
production will be identical to the 
main show of Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday evenings. 

Thirty-two all-star acts have 
been officially programmed by Ray- 
mond Kantz, the Circus' golden- 
voiced ring-master, who, too, had a 
practice announcing session last 
night. Of the 32 acts to be pre- 
sented, an even dozen will be cast 
in the famed "center ring." leaving- 
ten special acts for each of the end 
pits. 

"That will provide a ring-side 
view of the Circus for every pa- 
tron," Glenn Killinger, in charge of 
accommodations announced. "Of 
course front row occupants in any 
Circus naturally subject themselves 
the pranks of clowns, and that 
brings up another disillusionment. 

"While our Circus is sponsored 
by the College's Senior Health and 
Physical Education classes, it is not 
essentially an athletic show. By 
that I mean it is not going to be a 
competition in apparatus work or 
gym floor drills that would prove 
dull and uninteresting to the aver- 
age onlooker. Rather, it is, I be- 
lieve, a mixture of musical comedy, 
vaudeville, dancing, clowning and 
burlesque that will appeal to every- 
one—just what a regular circus 
should do." 



180 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



1934-1935 Gym Show 





Jack Weber, Janet Grater, Joe Guarini 






HrM 






MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 181 



22 MARCH 1935 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, WEST CHESTER, PA 



CIRCUS OPENS HERE TONIGHT FOR THREE 



DAY STAY; ADVANCE NOTICE 
BIGGER AND BETTER 



Third Annual Health Education 

Show Will Present More 

Than 300 Performers. 



E 



FLAPS UP AT 7:30 P. M. 

A gigantic, stupendous, breath-tak- 
ing spectacle! Such in a few words 
can the Third Annual Gym Circus be 
described. Death-defying acrobats, 
side-splitting clowns, beautiful girls, 
excellent athletes — all will perform 
tonight, Friday, and Saturday nights 
in the greatest spectacle that West 
Chester has ever seen. Rivalling 
Barnum and Bailey's, Ringling Broth- 
ers, and Hagenback-Wallace, the 
perfectly trained athletes of the 
Health Education Department of the 
West Chester State Teachers College 
will present an amazing show. Noth- 
ing will be lacking to make the pro- 
duction better than any circus that 
has yet been given. 

There will be hours of entertain- 
ment, there will be a thousand thrills, 
a million laughs, and a hundred dol- 
lars worth of entertainment. Thirty- 
two acts, each one a masterpiece in 
itself will fill the entire evening. Be- 
ginning at seven-thirty, and preceded 
by a half hour sideshow entertain- 
ment in front of the Ehinger Gym- 
nasium, the program will leap ahead 
at a fast and furious rate. But not a 
thing will be omitted. Every clown, 
every tumbler, every pyramider will 
perform each of the three nights. 

Three hundred men and women, all 
Health Education Students, will take 
part in this magnificent, unparalleled, 
superb presentation. The fireworks 
will begin with the unequalled Wodel 
Song by the Midget Wodeler — that 
mity atom — accompanied by a guitar 
player. Broadcasting the always-to- 
be-remembered circus song over Sta- 
tion W. C. S. T. C, this tiny star, 
favorite of all the crowned heads of 
Europe (sounds like a checker game) 
will thrill the audience with the 
Yodel Song. You'll never get over it. 

Ray Kautz, Ringmaster, will follow 
with some interesting announcements 
— and then will come the Grand 
Parade of the entire three hundred 
performers, the circus band, and fif- 
teen strange and almost unknown 
specimens of the animal world. Never 



before has such a galaxy of famous 
stars been grouped in one show. Never 
have such rare examples of the ani- 
mal kingdom been brought together 
under one roof! 

Forty men and women will then 
amaze the already entranced audience 
in a wonderful display of pyramids. 
They will build the highest human 
pyramids ever erected. The top per- 
former will practically touch the roof. 
"Muddy" Waters even stated that the 
pyramids would have been higher had 
the carpenters been able to elevate 
the roof of the gym in time for the 
circus. But as it is, could anything 
be greater? 

Apparatus work will be another of 
the main features of the entire pre- 
sentation. Men and women will again 
perform, separately and together. No 
one can afford to miss the world's 
funniest clowns and the extraordinary 
demonstration on the new apparatus, 
even to the teetering parallel bars on 
the top of the gym. Al Gwinn will 
lift you from your seats as he does 
his hair-raising back flips off the 
teeter board. What is a teeter board ? 
Come and And out and watch Gwinn 
Sip twelve feet into the air, 

Forty men and women will then 
amaze the already entranced audience 
in a wonderful display of pyramids. 
They will build the highest human 
pyramids ever erected. The top per- 
former will practically touch the roof. 
"Muddy" Waters even stated that the 
pyramids would have been higher had 
the carpenters been able to elevate 
the roof of the gym in time for the 
circus. But as it is, could anything 
be greater? 

Apparatus work will be another of 
the main features of the entire pre- 
sentation. Men and women will again 
perform, separately and together. No 
one can afford to miss the world's 
funniest clowns and the extraordinary 
demonstration on the new apparatus, 
even to the teetering parallel bars on 
the top of the gym. Al Gwinn will 
lift you from your seats as he does 
his hair-raising back flips off the 
teeter board. What is a teeter board ? 
Come and find out and watch Gwinn 
flip twelve feet into the air, higher 
than the baskets on the basketball 
backboards. He can almost balance 



PROMISES 
PERFORMANCE 

on the basket and drop one of his 
brilliant twin-pointers in on his trip 
into the air. 

Chick Conard and Bill Elrick will 
show the latest trick of jumping into 
bed. Don't miss their marvelous 
technique as they demonstrate this 
novelty. Meanwhile, two other men 
mil perform on the flying trapeze and 
will bring back to you memories of 
the famous strains of music so re- 
cently popularized again. Then will 
come a supreme exposition by the 
only dead man who can ride the uni- 
cycle. Nor can the demonstration of 
the best trick shooter ever shown 
professionally be overlooked. Freshly 
captured from the plains around 
Downingtown, this demon will show 
his wares to the largest crowd that 
the Ehinger gym has ever held. Al- 
ready a sellout has been assured. Only 
the general admission seats are left 
and there will undoubtedly be ar 
early rush for them. 

The women's apparatus number will 
bring before the crowd a famous 
group of women. They will use the 
parallel bars, the flying ring^, swing- 
ing ladders, and horses as they bring 
gasps and cheers with their act. 

There will he men and women folk 
dancers. Hardly a country of the 
world will lack a representative. 
Dancers from Russia, Spain, Italy, the 
Argentine, Germany, Holland, and 
what have you will be there. 

Midgets, tiny people not more than 
four feet tall, will be at this dynamic 
circus. Contrasted to them will be 
giants seven and -eight feet tall, 
specimens captured only after fierce 
struggles in the jungles of the distant 
shores of Africa and the Far East. 

A lady rider on a beautiful stallion 
— in other words a horse — will delight 
everyone with her graceful stunts. 
Too, there will be a beautiful and per- 
fectly executed skating scene that 
will center around a windmill ten feet 
high. There will be many skaters and 
ice-cutters in a veritable Winter Won- 
derland! 

A most intelligent trained seal and 
an eighteen foot long centipede just 
found in the miry jungles around 
Coatesville will provide a hundred 
more laughs and thrills as the Circus 



182 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



goes on. Skilled fencers visiting this 
country from their native France will 
vie against each other. 

Like a great three-ringed main 
show, the Circus will have a laugh 
and a thrill and a gasp for every sec- 
ond of the night. Men's apparatus 
performers will act on the flying 
rings, the horizontal bars, the paral- 
lels, and the horses, just as did their 
fairer friends before them. 

Then will appear another of the 
superb highlights of the evening. 
There will be in Ehinger Gym on 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
nights the best set of Hill Billy 
Dancers ever chased out of Kentucky 
by the revenuers. They will have 
dances of the solo, group, and comedy 
type. Bringing down the house with 
their performance, they will drama- 
tize in a memorable fashion the tale 
of the virtuous maiden, her hero, and 
the desperate villian. 

Imported statues from Europe 
(Duty Prepaid) will grace the scene 
in another number. This is the best 
act in the circus if one listens to what 
John Geib says. 

The grand finale will consist of 
tumbling and stunts by both men and 
women in the most difficult perform- 
ances ever attempted. The most out- 
standing man and woman tumbler in 
the college will each do the best in- 
dividual exercises that West Chester 
has ever seen. Men's and women's 
double and mixed doubles teams will 
present an act that has never been 
seen by anyone except in a grand 
hippodrome. 

The best clowns will do pyramids 
during various parts of the evening. 
Another group will prove to every- 
one's satisfaction that "Crime Does 
Not Pay." This item will be a riot. 
A bomb act during the course of the 
evening will be so terrific that it will 
blast the audience out of their seats. 
A. magician will mystify everyone as 
he floats a body around the gym in 
mid-air! 

Clowns from the football team will 
put on a real scrimmage and it is 
even rumored that tbey will try out 
Glenn Killinger's new football plays 
for the benefit of the students. A 
pair of clown adagio dancers, some 
golfers, some jugglers, some comical 
statues, and some Hill William 
clowns cannot help but bring roars of 
laughter from the crowd. 

The doors will open at seven 
o'clock each of the three nights and 
the main performance will begin at 
seven-thirty promptly. For a half an 
hour before the main performance 



there will be a grand and glorious 
sideshow in front of the gym. Per- 
formers and a band will be there to 
entertain all the early comers. A 
canvas covering will be extended 
across the walk leading to the gym 
and every circus item will be included. 
Barkers, ticket salesmen and per- 
formers — all will combine in the most 
magnificent show ever presented. 

Come one — come all — don't fail to 
see the 1935 production of the Health 
Education Department. One twenty- 
five cent piece will take you in to see 
the world's best and most noted acro- 
bats, clowns and animals perform. 

MARCH 28, 1934 

MIRTH AND MERRIMENT 
PREVAL AT ANNUAL 
HEALTH ED. JAMBOREE 
AND CIRCUS. 



Thrills Galore Delighted Throngs 

Who Attended Presentation 

Last Friday and Saturday. 



Directed By Senior Students. 



Clowns, Acrobats, Dancing Acts, 

Included in Diversified Group 

of Entertainments. 



Canvas and barkers; music and 
peanuts; — all the accoutriment of 
the circus. Such was the fantasia 
of recreated Ehinger Gymnasium 
that was presented to the large 
audiences that witnessed the second 
festival of the male health educa- 
tion students on Friday and Satur- 
day evenings of last week. 

Within the walls, whose prosaic 
appearance and atmosphere were 
transformed into the world of 
Pagliacci, clowns and acrobats^ be- 
guiled their audiences with their 
antics and eccentive perturbations. 
Combining a graceful execution of 
their maneuvers with artful buf- 
foonery, this group of artists suc- 
ceeded in effecting an appreciative 
response from a pleased throng. 

With the college criterions pre- 
senting the prelude of charming 
rhythms to "the early 1 comers, the 
program commenced with a con- 
trasting group of clown musicians 
with James Welch in the role of an 
aspiring maestro endeavoring to 
elicit some sort of harmony amid 
a confusion of blaring instruments. 
A particular pleasing dance by men 
purported to be Central American 
sun-worshippers in the persons of 



the sophomore health education 
men followed this initial display of 
cacaphony. 

In addition to these representa- 
ijves of Central America, a group 
of Borneo wild men, added their 
skillful group movements. A 
hilarious group of clowns cavorted 
in a most unreasonable display of 
foolhardy antics. The diving group, 
headed by Ruggerio Flocco, per- 
formed on the springboard with 
unusual success. 

A wrestling and cowboy act, in 
addition to a fine exhibition of a 
sailor group on the ropes, were 
noteworthy. The "champion" drill 
team of the world succeeded in their 
mission with their exacting disobed- 
ience of the commands.of their dis- 
mayed leader, Generalissimo Rogo. 

The concluding act was a fitting 
climax for the program. It in- 
cluded performances on various 
pieces of apparatus by groups of 
two people. They were exception- 
ally skilful in their group work. 

All the acts for the circus were 
planned by the Senior Health Edu- 
cation men, who directed the affair 
under the supervision of Mr. Earle 
C. Waters, and the* other members 
of the health education group, in- 
cluding Director Harry E. Allen. 
The art and music department col- 
laborated in the designing and pre- 
sentation of the unusual decorative 
and musical adjuncts. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 183 



PROGRAM (I935; 
Yodel Song- -McLaughlin 

1. Announcements by Ring Master 

2. Parade 

3. Pyramids (women) 



END NUMBERS 



4. Novelty Apparatus (men and women) 
(Target Shooting) 



5. Womens 1 Apparatus 

6. Folk Dances (men and women)' 



7« Stilts (women)- 



■-!• Animals (men) 
2. £lown Pyramids (men) 
3- Midget A c t (women) 

4. ©rime (men) 

5. (Jlown Mirror (w) 

6. East Side (m & w) 

7. Floating Body and 

Bomb A c t (m) 
■-8. £L 0wn Photography (w) 



9. <Jlown Dan r es (m) 

10. Horse and Rider (w) 

11. Football (m) 
12. Golf (m) 

13. Danging Doll (w) 

8. Skating (Dut^h S§ene)( women and men) No end numbers 

14. Juggling (m) 

15. Basketball game (w) 

9. Mens 1 Apparatus 16. #Lown Fencing (w) 

17. C of,fln Number ( w) 

18. Hlll-Billy c lowns (m) 

10. Hill-Billy Number (women and men) 19. tfentipedeand Trained 

(Tap Dances) Seal (w) 

11. Statues Clown Statues 

(No other end numbers) 

12. Tumbling and Stunts (women and men) No end numbers 

21 MARCH 1935 generally known. In face, it would CIRCUS ASIDES. 

be uncomplimentary to the efforts *--Two acts that had gone un- 

rUII nDUAi CUE 0f more ^J 50 ™ embe rs ot the noticed until yesterday won most 

Liu! LmLlVJLLi womens Health and Physical Edu- applause. They were the mixed 

viiiLviiun vm* caUon Department, a .'vision ex- tumbling and statue numbers, 

fAI I rrr CUAUJ cluded from the show '« year - groups representing the best in 

[\)L LrJlt UllUW For il was the Iatter ?uat won both men's and women's depart- 

vvuuuuu *#mw 11 most of the a ppi ause at the kid . ments."-While the Dutch skating 

Demonstration School Kid- scene nad its difficulties, the or- 

dies Enjov Performance dies ' matlnee yesterday. In twelve chestra shouldered the blame and 

\ *Ili • -• feature acts occupying the center ^ naving the numbers muslca i 

ot Athletic Circus. TJjig. nine were either sponsored or score re . w ritten for tonight's per- 

In a matinee performance for supported by the women students formance. 

the exclusive entertainment of 300 ? f the de P artment - T^ end num- ""The individual star of the 

^iSHtte the *» "TwZfn^ ^ " "Tumblers'' is Miss Janet Grater. 

West Chester State Teachers Col- Tolling the Circus' practice ^"oft^e %T£*tw w^ 

lege Indoor Circus yesterday after- „ rinrt „ t TnpsriM the cast had aooui 01 me colleges iwo popaiar 

Eg, Jg Jen^nted 6 ^holiday o^rfni "^"part^ onglnallv 

S T wra" last-minute switcn n, « «£,£ ZtfSfgL Sff*" J? A&e^danM 

the plans of the general faculty ^t^f !)emon S ^tlT&n»l ^- tlTu^Z^ ZfmV?™™ 

committee that made it possible for il£ see mg any night performance tT »,?™t , V ! ctro1 ' 

the Model School pupils to pass P czused th t s J den B chan ge in plans. ,. ^L^^^nS^*^ 

first judgment on the show that Excepting an act or two that re- .^ -mTw the subse- 

will be reproduced before West auu J; S necial lighting effects yes- q ? ", Maln Show was tne work 

Chester pat?ons tonight, tomorrow *™f/ s P ^perfornfancl IT »1S- L^nt^S re " 

night and Saturday. lengt ^ nee ding two and one-half J™ , s *™"" n * ^ach —Advance 

To say the Circus is bigger and nou V time . Full costumes were «£?££?. g °° d h0USeS aU 

better this year than ever before ^^ lmec nights, 
would be repeating a fact already 



184 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



22 MARCH 1935 



Teachers College Athletic 
Circus Opens Before Great 
Crowd and Scores Big Hit 

Ehinger Gym Converted Into "Big Top" for Three- 
Ring Performance Featuring Glamor and Skill of 
Regular Circus. Annual Event Bigger and 
Better in Every Respect 

State Teachers College students stole a march on 
the show world last night. 

With most of the country's circus paraphernalia and 
animal troupes still tied up in winter quarters, the Health 
and Physical Education Departments of the college sud- 
denly came to life here last evening in the first perform- 
ance of their three-night annual circus, a startling con- 
coction of all the thrills, chills and spills of the real 
sawdust ring. • 

Temporarily, Ehinger Gymnasium, on the college 
campus, has been turned into a "big top." On ordinary 
occasions, the gym is just a place where the boys play 
basketball and take their daily dozens, but for the annual 
circus it is a place transformed — a mammoth tent filled 
with all the glamorous props of show business, a mighty 
bee-hive of circus activity in which an immaculate ring- 
master directs an amazingly realistic program. 



Vying with the folk dances for 
ej'e-pleasing grace and color was 
the Dutch skating scene. Eight cou- 
ples, dressed in Dutch peasant cos- 
tume, flashed around the floor on 
roller skates that were cleverly de- 
signed to look like ice. skates. Two 
sleighs on rollers, and a shower of 
confetti that really gave the il- 
lusion of falling snow, gave a wiD- 
ter tang to the picture. The whoV 
thing was presented to lively rr.usH 
against a Dutch windmill back- 
ground. 

One jf the most- sensational fea- 
tures of the evening was the pro- 
gram of gymnastics performed by 
the college's crack apparatus team. 
This outfit, composed of James 
Singer and Chick Connard on the 
rings, Mike Wyatt and Al Gwinn on 
the high bar, Jilly McLaughlin and 
John Brown on the parallel bars, 
and Ted Satterfield and Ralph 
Fuoss on the sidehorse, did splen- 
did work. 

A clever hill-billy song-dance skit 
number was put on as the next 
main attraction. This feature was 
created and directed by Lawson 
Earle, Senior Health-Ed student, 
and presented Earle, Frank Bennett 
and George Springer in the skit, as 
well as the Varsity Quartet. 

An innovation this year was the 
presentation of a series of living 
cfarHTpa rfoHctlno- vartrms KtmTts 



The gymnasium was crowded to« 
its 800-seat capacity, last night, for 
this highly colorful, gaily bedecked 
frolic, and "press agents" aver that 
the crowds will be of capacity size 
again tonight and tomorrow night. 

Students turned out to be excel- 
lent showmen, and whether teaching 
and trouping have anything in com- 
mon or not, the college men and 
women went through their stunts 
like veteran performers. The man 
on the flying trapeze, the lady in 
tights, the typical circus band, the 
glaring posters, and the fluttering 
flags — th;; were all there, plus a 
hundred and one other clever de- 
vices, to create the circus atmos- 
phere. 

THREE xtiNGS. 

There were three rings arranged 
on the gym floor, presided over by 
Ringmaster Ray Kantz, who intro- 
duced each of the twelve main acts 
with traditional ringmaster flourish. 
Main acts were presented only once, 
in the center ring. The end rings 
were used in putting on the twenty 
or more ccmic numbers, which 
were repealed, ones in each end ring. 

Blazoned and ballyhooed as 
proverbially bigger and better than 
ever, the 1935 College Circus un- 
doubtedly surpasses the- perform- 
ances of other years. Even a Bar- 
nura would have been kept on the 
edge of his seat last night, as the 
marvelous grace, balance and agili- 
ty of the acrobats, and the strength 
and daring of the husky muscle- 
flexers, were unfolded In true cir- 
cus fashion. 



and athletics. These were of a high 
standard of excellence, and made a 
hit with the crowd. 

In the final feauue women md 
men acrobats participated in a se- 
ries of tumbling ac's. and streng-b 
and balance stunts. Specialtits were 
put on by Joe Guarini. Jack Weber 
and Miss Janet Grat-r. a young 
lady of very flexible proportions 
who did difficult contortions and 
leg-splits with surprising ease. 

Tne end numbers ot the progiam. 
twenty in number, were the laugh- 
provokers of the evening, introduc- 
ing clowns, comic acrobats, clever 
specialty numbers, tummy-tickling 
tableaux, and hilarious mimicry. 

Tcnight, the program will start 
at 7.45, instead of 7.30. the opening 
hour last night. Saturday, there 
will be a matinee, as well as an 
evening peraformance. 

Professor Harry Allen, head of 
the Health Education Department, 
promoted the Circus, assisted by 
Earle C. Waters, Monroe McLean, 
Miss Muriel Leach and Miss Anne 
Schaub. 



The usual parade around the 
arena opened the show, bringing out 
a procession of more than a hun- 
dred featured performers, and 
dozens of extras. With the aid of a 
high ladder, the first main act, a va- 
riety of pyramiding feats was put 
on. Twenty-four girls and eighteen 
men took part in this impressive 
number, displaying strength and 
balance. 

Fror i pyramiding, the program 
turned to novelty apparatus work, 
the men first appearing in comedy 
stunts on the flyitfg rings and a 
high-bar see-saw. In the thira ea- 
tured act, women performers took 
c.r the apparatus and exhibited a 
diversity of gymnastics on the rings, 
the sidehorse and the parallel bars. 

One of the most beautiful and 
colorful numbers of the whole show 
was the exhibition of folk dancing 
In striking and authentic costumes, 
half a dozen or more couples per- 
formed a Russian dance, a Spanish 
tango number, and a tambourine 
dance. Miss Elizabeth Mattey, in 
white pantaloons and boots, put on 
a ' strenuous spotlight specialty 
dance that made the crowd ap- 
plaud. 

"A startling and clever featuie was 
next presented in the center ring by 
fifteen girls, led by Miss Elea- 
nor Lavery, who stalked through 
the steps of a grotesque dance on 
tiemendously tall stilts To the 
tune of 'Flirtation Walk." these 
high steppers kept in admirable 
rhythm. 



22 MARCH 1935 



COLLEGE FIRE IS 

PUT OUT QUICKLY 

Short Circuit in Uiris' Dressing 

Room in Gymnasium Causes 

Brief Kxcitcmcnt. 

Prompt a-tion on i -c part of 
student ushers last night averted 
what might have been a near-panic 
in Ehinger gymnasium, as the State 
Teachers College presented the 
opening performance of its three- 
day Annual Health Education cir- 
cus. , , . 

Crossed wires caused a short- 
circuit in the girls' dressing room 
Just a few minutes before the open- 
ing of the show. Smoke poured 
forth, and a whispered exclamation 
of "fire" startled the circus hands 
and extra., behind the scenes. 

Frank Machinsky, an usher, aid- 
ed by several of his fellows, quickly 
found the trouble and remedied it. 
There was no blaze, and the show 
went on as scheduled. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 185 



Miss Anne Schaub of the faculty was the designated treasurer for controlling circus funds during 
her tenure at the college. This position she held with distinction. In her initial efforts she learned that 
the circus profit funds for the 1933 and 1934 shows had to be given by Director Allen to President 
Norman Cameron for audit in 1934 along with the miltuple funds that he administered (see coUege 

history 1933-1935). 

Finally Miss Schaub with the support of the new President Charles S. Swope created the system 
where in the profits would revert to support the activities of the students who performed in these 
shows. This is Miss Schaub's 1935 analysis: 



l?tt ffWVS rum 

This fond was formed by the profits on the circus promoted by 
the Health Education Departraent. After ell expenses of the clrcue 
were paid, there ess a net profit of $301.01. This sua was spent 
chargeable to the following groups: 

Health Ed. Dept. * 36.96 

Health Ed. Men 100.09 

Health Ed. ffoaen 83.00 

C. 0. A. 80.98 



8 301.01 



The eostuaee and properties bought are in a property closet 
la the Ehlnger Gymnasium. A copy of the Inventory of this aaterlal 
Is In the Book noon. 

The books bought with money froa this fund are In the Health 
Education Library In the old gymnasium. 



186 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Illness Fatal To Dr. Ehinger At Iowa Home 



Former College Physical Ed- 
ucation Head Succumbs 
at Keokuk. 

T . , „ - Q '. ' 



WAS BORN THERE 

77 YEARS AGO 



Deceased Was Well Known 
Here, Where H e Had 
Made Many Friends; Was 
Founder of Bird Club; 
New Gymnasium at 
Teachers College Named 
in His Honor. 




Caspar P. Faucett, of Rosedale 
avenue, yesterday received a tele- 
gram from Keokuk. Iowa, saying 
that his former neighbor. Dr. Clyde 
E. Ehinger, had passed away at 2.15 
P. M.. having been ill since Christ- 
mas Day. The telegram was sent 
by Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger's adopted 
daughter, Mrs. Lillian Coppelhofler, 
who realized that many warm 
friends of the family, here, would 
sympathize in the sorrow that has 
come to Mrs. Ehinger and herself. 

Dr. Clyde Ehinger was the first 
director of physical education at 
IState Teachers College, coming 
here in 1910, when the first gym- 
nasium, now known as the "Old 
Gym.." was built. For thirty years 
he and Mrs. Ehinger were at the 
head of this department, but did 
not limit their interests to james 
and gymnastics. Dr. Ehinger was 
deeply interested in nature, finding 
keen pleasure in the study of birds, 
Rowers and trees in their native 
habitat. He was the originator of 
the West Chester Bird Club, which 
for a long time held its meetings at 
his home on Rosedale avenue, and 
of which he was the first president. 

Dr. Ehinger was born near Keo- 
kuk. Iowa, in 1858. He was the son 
of a physician, of German birth, 
who was also a botanist of some 
note. In his association with his 
father, the youth became deeply in- 
terested, not only in the profession 
of medicine, but also in nature. He 
was graduated from the University 
of Iowa and from the Chicago 
Homeopathic Medical College, re- 
reiving his degree in 1878. For a 
time he practiced in Chicago, and 
Inter in Quincy. HI., but his interest 



in promoting health was always 
greater than in curing disease. In 
this his wife, formerly Miss Ella M. 
Long, shared, and they determined 
to take up the profession of physical 
education. They took their train- 
ing at the School of Physical Edu- 
cation in Brooklyn, N. Y.. and came 
here in 1890. 

For a time Dr. and Mrs. Ehinger 
lived in the school's main building, 
but in 1907, after spending some 
years in a home on College avenue, 
they built the attractive house on 
Rosedale avenue, which was their 
home for nearly fifteen years. Here 
they extended cordial hospitality to 
their many friends, and here the 
Bird Club was officially organized 
in 1910. The club was of gradual 
growth, having begun with "Bird 
Walks" led by Dr. Ehringer and 
joined in by a group of congenial 
spirits for some years before the 
official organization. 

Dr. Ehinger taught a class for a 
number of years in the High Street 
Friends' First-day School, and was 
interested in all matters of educa- 
tional or civic advancement in the 
town. 

In 1921 Dr. Ehringer resigned 
from the faculty of the College, be- 
cause of ill health, and retired to 
the vicinity of his early home in 
Keokuk. When the Ehinger Gym- 
nasium on Wayne Field was dedicat- 
ed in his honor, about four years 
ago, he and Mrs. Ehinger were 
guests of honor, and spent several 
weeks among old friends here. 
About two years ago they a?ani vis- 
ited West Chester, and have kept 
in touch with former associates al- 
ways sending greetingss. frequently 
original, at Christmas time. 

They are remembered with affec- 
tion by many friends here 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 187 



DR. WILLIAM GILBERT ANDERSON 

Z«e PARK STREET 

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 




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188 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Second 
Alumnus President 



A.B., A.M., Po.U 



DR. CHARLES S. SWOPE 

Dr. Charles S. Swope was born at Saltillo, Pennsylvania, 
March 19, 1899. He graduated from West Chester State 
Normal School in 1921 and in 1925 received his A.B. degree 
from Dickinson College. 

Prior to entering West Chester as a student he was a rural 
teacher in Beavertown, Pennsylvania from 1916 - '18. He 
taught in the Pennington School for Boys, Pennington, New 
Jersey, 1921-23 and in 1925-26. He married Miss Edna 
McAllister of York, Pennsylvania, a member of the class of 
1921. He accepted the Superintendcucy of Schools in Everett, 
Pennsylvania in 1926. The following year he was appointed 
instructor of Social Studies at West Chester State College. In 
1935 he was appointed President of the college, the second 
alumnus serving in this office. 

During his Presidency his contributions to the growth of 
the college matched those of George Morris Philips to the 
earlier Normal School. During his career as President the 
college grew to be one of the largest State Teachers Colleges in 
the Commonwealth and the largest undergraduate school of 



education in Pennsylvania. His leadership during the trying war 
years 1941-1945 enabled the college to meet some of the most 
serious challenges to its existence. 

Under Dr. Swope's regime, the most extensive building 
program in West Chester's liistory was both planned and set in 
motion. He also inaugurated the graduate program, the Public 
School Nurses' curriculum, and introduced the plan for a 
multi-purpose institution with University status as the desired 
goal. 

Dr. Swope served as a member of the Board of Directors of 
the Community Chest from 1939 until 1943 and President in 
1941 ; a member of the Board of Directors and Vice-President 
of Chester Council Council of Boy Scouts of America, and 
President of the same Council, 1940 to 1947. He was a 
member of the Board of Directors of the Pennington School 
for Boys, as well as a member of the Board of Directors of 
West Chester Methodist Church. He was also a member of 
Schoolmen's Committee, Academy of Political and Social 
Science, American Historical Association, National Education 
Association, Pennsylvania State Education Association, and 
Plii Kappa Sigma, the X Club, and the West Chester Golf and 
Country Club. 

Dr. Swope served as a member of the Board of Directors of 
the West Chester Rotary Club from 1936 until 1942; 
President, 1940-1941 ; and Governor of the 179th (now 265th) 
District of Rotary International 1947-48. 

During his term as President the number of faculty doubled 
and the student body increased three-fold. Dr. Swope, like Dr. 
Philips, died while in the service of the institution he loved. 
His death occurred May 30, 1959. 

The Senate of Pennsylvania, in a resolution passed at the 
time of his death, declared: 

"Doctor Swope was one of the Commonwealth's most 
eminent educators and leaders. He contributed a great 
deal to the benefit of all of the citizens of this 
Commonwealth in extremely important areas of 
education, civic affairs, and religion." 



February Tiventy -Second — l\[pt Just a Holiday 




WASHING TON", a ballad play written by Percy MacKaye was produced 
this year by the student body. It proved to he an appropriate and 
successful bit of work tor us to do to celebrate this birthday. T he 
scenes in the play represented significant episodes in Washington s life— from 
manhood until the retirement from public life. 

Various departmentsol the school were active in making the play the success 
it was. Congratulations go to members of the English. Music, Educational and 
Health Education Departments. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 189 



Indoor Circus Called OfT. 

Dr. Harry R. Allen, director of 
sports and head of the Department 
of Health Education at the West 
Chester State Teachers College, 
announces that the annual indoor 
circus by the students of the Health 
Education Department will not be 
held this year, as has been the 
custom for several seasons past, 
but will be deferred until next 
year. Preparations for this big 
event has always required a great 
deal of time and considerable ex- 
pense for costumes, equipment, etc., 
for the host of participants. 



29 FEBRUARY 1936 



Olympiads Flan 
Giant Gym Show 

Preparations Being Made By 
Health Ed Honor Group. 



On Saturday night, March 7, the 
Olympic Club, the goal of every 
health education man on the campus, 
will present a gym exhibition in the 
Ehinger Gymnasium. This will be 
somewhat of an innovation, in as 
much as the Olympic Club seldom 
appears in public here at the college. 
Since there will be no Health Ed 
Circus this year, the Olympiads will 
have the cream of the talent of 
gymnasts. The boys have been work- 
ing hard in preparation for this 
event, and all are in prime condition 
to show their prowess to the student 
body. The affair promises to be a 
brilliant exhibition of gymnastic 
skill. 

"We are in no way attempting to 
replace the Health Bd Circus," said 
Charles Conard, president of the 
Olympic Club, when approached on 
the subject, "because it would be im- 
possible to do that. However, we do 
feel that we can give the student 
body an exhibition comparable, witb 
that of any collegiate gym team in 
this section. We merely ask the stu- 
dents to see us in action and judge for 
themselves." 

So, students, let's turn out to the 
Ehinger Gymnasium next Saturday 
night and watch West Chester's sons 
of the gods of Olympus perform. 







Mr MacLean, Mr. Kiluxcer 
Mil. Waters. Miss Wade, M«. Allen, Miss Schaub. Miss Leach 




SPORTS PYRAMIE 



Gym Team Travels 
To Mahoney City 

Take Part In High School 

Demonstration Of Gymnastic 

Activities. 



Our gym team travelled to Mahanoy 
City last Friday evening to take 
part in the High School Demonstra- 
tion of Gymnastic Activities. The first 
part of the show was given over to 
the High School groups and the girl's 
dance numbers and the boy's Indian 
dance were the high points of the ex- 
hibition. 

Following this our men performed 






on the springboard, horizontal bar, 
rings, side horse, and parallel bars. 
Outstanding performers were Al 
Gwinn on the horizontal bar, Jim 
Singer and Chick Conard on the rings, 
George McGinnis on the side horse, 
and Ralph Fuoss and Chick Conard on 
the springboard. Due to the late 
hour, the exhibition was shortened 
and the doubles combinations on the 
mats by Forwood and Downin and 
Topping and Doyle were omitted. 
John Steckbeck, Zenas Savage, and 
Ted Topping contriDuted to the suc- 
cess and enjoyment of the evening by 
their expert clowning. Director Allen 
accompanied the team in the absence 
of Coach Waters. 



190 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1936. 

CHAMPION GYMNASTS 
TO PERFORM WITH 
OLYMPIC CLUB 



Exhibit Apparatus Ability In 

Ehinger Gym Tonight; 

Admission Charged. 

Informal Dance Will Follow 
Exhibition. 



Tonight at eight o'clock the 
Olympic Club of the College will 
sponsor an exhibition to be given by 
tbj combined men's and women's 
gym team:;. This demonstration is 
to be the outstanding event in the 
line of gymnastic activities for the 
year. Quoting "Chick" Conard, Presi- 
dent, 'Th: Cub is not attempting to 
duplicate tha work of the Circus, held 
last year, but we are sure that the 
program will be of great interest to 
the students of the College and all 
others that attend.' - 

The program will include work on 
the horizontal bar, the parallel bars, 
the horse, the rings, and the mats. On 
the mats there will ba both single and 
double combinations. The mixed 
double and the men's double combina- 
tions will be remembered for their 
marked degree of excellence in the 
Circus; however, practice sessions 
predict even greater heights this 
year. 

As a special attraction for the pro- 
gram, two prospective members of 
the United States Olympic Gym Team 
for the 1936 games will give an exhi- 
bition of their skills. These two star 
performers are the mainstays of the 
championship Temple University team 
and in Chet Phillips and Joe Hewlett 
we have the pleasure and opportunity 
of watching them in action. Chet 
Phillips was unanimously awarded 
the Ail-American Intercollegiate 
Championship for 1935 on all around 
performance on the apparatus and in 
his junior year he is now captain of 
the Temple Gym Team. 'Joe Hewlett, 
a sophomore, is close behind the 
champion in recognition and these 
two have gladly consented to be with 
us tonight. Incidentally, both are 
graduates of Girard College, Philadel- 
phia, and close friends of several 
former Girardians here on the cam- 
pus. 



There will be a number of familiar 
individuals performing in the men's 
group: Captain Charles Conard, 
James Singer, James McLaughlin, 
Ralph Fuoss, Charles Downin, Robert 
Forward, Michael Doyle, John Steck- 
beck, George McGinnis, Laverne 
Shelleniberger, Russell Struzebecker, 
William Elrick, Zenas Savage, Albert 
Gwinn, Vincent Remcho, John Weber, 
and Edward Topping. The women 
performers will include, Anna Jack- 
son, Alice Eggert, Olive Hartman, 
Betty Molish, Janet Grater, Josephine 
Unger, and Helen Replogle. 

The entire program is being spon- 
sored and coached by the Olympic 
Club, under the capable leadership of 
the officers: Charles Conard, Presi- 
dent; Edward Topping, Vice Presi- 
dent; and Ralph Fuoss, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Immediately following the exhibi- 
tion there will be dancing in Recrea- 
tion Hall to the tunes of the Purple 
and Gold Criterions. 

14 MARCH 1936 

500 See Olympic 
Club Exhibition 
In Gvmnasium 



Phillips And Hewlett, Temple 

Aces, Featured On Gym 

Apparatus. 

In excellent form, the Olympic 
Club of the College sponsored an ex- 
hibition which will be long remember- 
ed by those who attended last Satur- 
day. The demonstration gave the 
students an opportunity to witness 
the best performers on the apparatus 
that any college can offer. The work 
of Chet Phillips and Joe Hewlett of 
Temple University so inspired our 
boys that their performance far sur- 
passed any gymnastic demonstration 
to date. 

Some five hundred students and 



towns-people attended and were 
thrilled by the performance of all 
those participating. Starting with the 
horitontal bar, the performers show- 
ed skill in completing giant swings, 
levers, kipps, circles, and to top it all, 
Chet Phillips executed a "peach bas- 
ket," a trick which is rarely attempt- 
ed. After missing on the first try 
and being saved from possible injury 
by the alertness of Joe Hewlett, he 
regained his composure and executed 
a perfect performance. The horse was 
next in order and it was thrilling to 
watch these two Temple athletes per- 
form caroms in whirling round and 
round above the apparatus. The 
parallel bars afforded the best piece 
of apparatus to work on for our 
guests, and some of the maneuvers 
performed were breath-taking. Our 
gymnasts performed best on the fly- 
ing rings and their work was highly 
commendable. To add a grand finale 
to the exhibition, Chet Phillips did a 
specialty number on the mats and 
finished with a front somersault with 
a full twist and a straight boCy. 

It is interesting to note that the 
two guests are prospective members 
of the United States Olympic Gym 
Team for the 1936 games, and the 
College was greatly honored by their 
willingness to cooperate with our 
Olympic Club. The Club hopes to 
have them out here again in the near 
future and should be congratulated on 
their success in bringing these two 
athletes to our campus. 

The show was a complete success 
from every angle. Those performing 
in the men's group were: Captain 
Charles Conard, James McLaughlin, 
James Singer, Ralph Fuoss, Charles 
Downin, Robert Forward, Michael 
Doyle, John Steckbeck, George Mc- 
Ginnis, Laverne Shellenberger, Russell 
Sturzebecker, William Elrick, Zenas 
Savage, Albert Gwinn, and Vincent 
Remcho. The women performers in- 
cluded: Alice Eggert, Anna Jackson, 
Olive Hartman, Betty Molish, Janet 
Grater, Josephine Unger, and Helen 
Replogle. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 191 




1936 Gymnastic Team 

(1st. row) G. M McGuiness, R. Fuoss, T. Topping, C. Conard, J. Singer, R. Shellenberger 

(2nd. row) R. Forwood, M. Doyle, V. Remcho, Coach Earle Waters, C. Downin, A. Gwinn, Elrick 




The College Orchestra provided music 
background for the show performance 



192 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



5 MARCH 1937 



HEALTH ED CIRCUS OFF 

The health education circus, scheduled 
to be held March 11, 12, 13, was definitely 
called off. Director Allen attributes the 
failure of the circus to many factors. 
First, the other educational departments 
felt that the health education department 
was taking too much of the students' 
time, thus causing a laxity in their 
studies. Second, the teachers in the 
health education department are so 
few that almost all their time is consumed 
in instructing classes. Director Allen 
feels, however, that the circus may be 
combined with the senior May Day 
festival. 



7 MARCH 1937 

U. S. Olympic Star 
to Perform Here 



m| 5T1 


4 * 


■ 









Chet Phillips Will Appear On 
Olympic Club Program 



"Chet" Phillips, 1936 Olympic star 
and Joe Hewlett of Temple will furnish 
outstanding performances on the appa- 
ratus at the Olympic Club's gymnastic 
exhibition on March 11, 1937 at 7:30 
p. m. in the Ehinger Gym. 

Under the direction of Bob Forwood, 
president of the club. Director Allen, and 
Coach Waters, an exhibition of unusual 
merit is being planned. 

Among the performers is Johnny 
Tasso who received high scoring honors 
in the recent gym meet with Kutztown. 
Three senior members of the squad, 
Johnny Taronis, Russ Sturzebecker, and 
Vince Remcho, will make their last public 
appearance. 

Assisting the Olympic Club gymnasts 
will be members of the girls' health 
education group. They will demonstrate 
pyramid building, together with mixed 
doubles on the mats and apparatus. 

Admission to the exhibition is twenty- 
fivjfc. cents, which also includes the dance 
afterwards in Recreation Hall. 




The Author 

And 
Mike Doyle 




MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 193 



12 MARCH 1937 



Olympic Club 
Gives Annual 

Exhibition 



Phillips and Hewlett Feature 
Gym Show; Girls Perform 

The Olympic Club gave its annual 
exhibition last night in the Ehinger 
Gym featuring "Chet" Phillips of the 
American Olympic Gym Team and 
"Joe" Hewlett, Temple University lu- 
minary. 

"Chet" Phillips lived up to the repu- 
tation he acquired last year when he 
gave an exhibition here, while his team- 
mate, "Joe" Hewlett also gave an ex- 
cellent performance. Of the Olympic 
Club members who performed, Johnny 
Tasso proved his ability to cope with 
the best gymnasts in the country. 

Featured on the program was Rodney 
Waters, 8-year old son of 'Coach Earle 
Waters, who gave a remarkable perfor- 
mance on the mats. Another feature 
was the exhibition of the mixed doubles 
in which Russell Sturzebecker and 
Charles Downin, paired with "Jackie" 
Jackson and Helen Replogle, gave ac- 
credited performances. 

Among the male performers. Bob 
Forwood, and Glenn Miller were out- 
standing. Among the feminine per- 
formers, Betty Molish gave a remarkable 
performance of tumbling, and "Jackie" 
Jackson gave the best all-around per- 
formance. Other performers were John 
Taronis, Don Bixler, LaVerne Shellen- 
berger, John Eubank, John McNab, 
"Mike" Doyle, Harry Thaete, Thelma 
Carl, Flossie Naylor, Janet Grater, Peggy 
Thomas, and Eleanor Leathers. 

A dance was held after the exhibition. 
J. Earl Baker and the Criterions supplied 
the music for the dance as well as 
accompaniment for the performers. 



- jiti 


ipjn '■■ 


h!SI^ 







Seniors: The Author and John Taronis 





Joe Hewlett 



Chet Phillips 



194 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Chet Phillips and Joe Hewlett 
Star In Olympic Club Show 

Johnny Tasso Heads Ram Gymnasts 

As Temple Duo Captures Capacity Crowd 

MOLISH, HARTMAN, AND JACKSON HEAD GIRLS' ACTS 



By Ken Shotts 

There was standing room only last Thursday evening as the 
Ehinger Gym rang with the plaudits accorded Olympian Chet Phillips 
and his hosts, the Olympic Club of West Chester State. The occasion 
was the annual gymnastic exhibition presented by the College clubmen 
and featured for the second straight year the internationally famous 
Phillips and his Temple "U" teammate and captain, Joe Hewlett. 

Phillips, who represented the - 
United States at Berlin in the re- 



cent Olympiad, completely stole 
the show, as expected, with a great 
exhibition of all around prowess. 
Before the evening was over he 
performed with remarkable ability 
and smoothness on virtually every 
set of apparatus in the Gym; and 
together with Hewlett completely 
captured the capacity crowd. 

Tasso Best Ram Performer 
The women of the local Health Edu- 
cation Department assisted the muscle- 
men of the College to put on a great 
show in support of their guest stars. 
Johnny Tasso gave a well rounded per- 
formance that would have easily been 
the hit of the show had it not been for 
the presence of the intercollegiate lumi- 
naries. The frosh ace appears destined 
to go a long ways in the gymnastic game 
and was easily the best Ram performer 
on the floor. Of the many feminine 
stars who were outstanding perhaps the 
most noteworthy performances were 
scored by the graceful Betty Molish, 
Anna Jackson, and the versatile Olive 
Hartman. 

The girls' pyramid team commenced 
the evening's activities with a group of 
novel formation and were followed by a 
remarkable tumbling performance by 
Rodney Waters, eight year old son of 
Earle Waters, popular coach of the 
Purple and Gold's crack gym team. 
Tasso then turned in the first of his 
many good presentations with a series 
of front handsprings on the mats, cul- 
minating in a front flip. He finished up 
with a chain of back flips ending in a 
round-off. 

Betty Molish Well Received 

After the mat duo of Russ Sturzebecker 

and Mike Doyle performed ably, Miss 

Molish rendered a difficult rhythmic 

performance that was well received. 



This graceful exhibition was followed by 
a good team act by Bob Forwood and 
Charley Downin. Chet Phillips made 
his bow at this point and executed a 
series of intricate twists in a great 
tumbling act. The Cherry and White 
star finished up with a front flip with a 
half turn. 

Girls trios sparkled on the rings, 
parallel bars, and on the horse. Molish, 
Ludmilla Tarasoff, and Anna Jackson, 
performed on the horse; Hartman. Tara- 
soff and Mary Jane Spidle. on the rings; 
and Hartman, Flossie Xaylor and Spidle, 
on the bars. Among the mixed mat 
duos to shine were those of Betty Thom- 
as and Forwood. Jackson and Sturze- 
becker, Janet Grater and Don Bixler, 
Ann Replogle and Downin, and Spidel 
and MacNab. 

One of the best arrays of clowns ever 
to appear in a local show made their 
entry midway in the performance and 
their ludicrous efforts went over in a big 
way. Mock tumbling acts with a tricky 
three man roll, and breath-taking humor 
on the high bar and rings kept the 
spectators in a continual uproar. 

Stars Show Versatility 

Phillips, although performing excep- 
tionally well on all apparatus, turned in 
his most convincing exhibitions on the 
parallel bars and on his specialty, the 
high bar. Hewlett, the other Owl ace, 
was almost equally at home all over the 
gym, and gave great acts on the rings, 
parallels and especially the horse. Phil- 
lips thrilled the crowd with the execution 
of an original feat on the parallels. 

From a handstand, which he achieved 
with ridiculous ease, he catapulted into 
a backsomersault with a side turn; he 
is the only gymnast able to perform 
such a stunt. 



Vernon Shellenberger alternated with 
the Temple stars on the horse and 
furnished a nice exhibition. Forwood, 
Downin, soph star Johnny Eubank, 
and freshmen" Tasso and Glenn Miller 
performed well on the parallel bars for 
the Clubmen. Of the Purple and Gold 
men to shine on the flying rings, For- 
wood, McLaren. Sturzebecker, MacNab, 
Tate and Miller were best. 

Forwood, Doyle, Miller, Tate, Mac- 
Xab and Tasso were the local represen- 
tatives on the high bar. This is Tasso's 
favorite event and he and Tate turned 
in scintillating performances. 

Allen and Waters Given Credit 

It was with his specialty, the high 
bar, that Phillips rang down the curtain 
on a great show. The Olympic star 
alternated here with Joe Hewlett and 
with an intricate series of swings and 
kips, they proved why they rank at the 
top in gymnastic circles. Phillips front 
and back giant swings with turns and 
twists furnished a fitting climax to the 
exhibition. 

Harry K. Allen, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Health and Physical Education 
Department proved to be an able 
announcer for the affair, which owed 
its success in no small measure to the 
untiring efforts of Mr. Allen and Coach 
Waters. The performers went through 
their paces to the strains of popular 
music rendered by the inimitable Purple 
and Gold Criterions with Earl Baker at 
the helm. The Club, of which Bob 
Forwood is the capable president, pre- 
sented its annual dance in Recreation 
Hall following the exhibition. 




HARRY R. ALLEN 

Affectionately known 
by all his students as "Doc Yak" 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 195 



THE VARSITY CLUB 



LINE-UP 



OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
WEST CHESTER, PA. 



PRESENTS 



JULIUS CAESAR 



A LIGHT OPERA 

IN 

FIVE AND A HALF SCENES 



WITH APOLOGIES TO WILLIAM SHAKES FEARt 



CHARLES GROVER ROACH. 
DEAN OF INTERNAL AFFAIRS. 

AND MASTER OF CEREMONIES 



WErNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 24, 1937 

PHILIFS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

9:C0 O'CLOCK 



DRAMATIS PERSONAE 

CAESAR ALBERT ANGELO 

BRUTUS Russell Sturzebecker 

ANTONY George Blackburn 

CASS I US John Taronis 

CASCA Stanley Krupn i k 

TREBON I US Alden- Ramsdell 

CALPURN I A V i ncent Rf.mcho 

PORT I A Arthur Walter 

LUCIUS Clevio Rogo 

SOOTHSAYER Charles Forbes 

CAESAR'S ARMY - Franklin Beardsly 
Levin Hanigan Paul Bruno Roy Miller 
Jchn MacNab Aoclph Nagelberg 

JANITORIUM -William Beswick John Tasso 
Vincent Remcho 



CREPITUS 

PLAY BY SHAKESPEARE 

AMERICAN ADAPTATION - Blackburn and Sturzebecker 

COSTUMES EXECUTED by S.T.C Laundry 

SCENERY from Wayne Hall 

MUSIC - Ccurtesy of Bizet, Sousa, Verdi, Mendelssohn, etc. 

LYRICS - Ccurtesy of Roberta Mack 

ORCHESTRA under direction of Praztor William Davis 

LIGHTING - Fred Turner 

STAGE PERMISSION - Fern Barrer 

PROGRAM - Ccurtesy of Florence Shepherd 

MISCELLANEOUS - Traffic Signs from College Campus; Knives from 

S.T.C. dining room ;Mus i cal Instruments from J. Earl Baker ;Baseball 

Bat - courtesy of John Tarcnis;' Dici: - Ms . Peofles; Stuffed Bird 

(STANDARD) .DlCTIONARY.ETC. - S . T . C . LIBRARY; SCLD I ERS COSTUMES - 

property room; Saw and wood - Mr . Finnegan; Mops-Charles Grover 
Roach . Dean cf Internal Affairs. Wayne Hall. 



196 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



PROGRAMUS 



JULIUS CAESAR 

TIME -58 B.C. PLACE- ROME 

SCENE I- A Roman Street - March 14th - Morning 
SCENE II- Brutus' Orchard - Same - Evening 
SCENE II?- Caesar's House - Same - Evening 
SCENE III- Senate House - Ides of March (15th) 
SCENE IV- Brutus' Tent - March 16th - Evening 
SCENE V- Plains of Phillipi - March 17th - Afternoon 

CURTAIN 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 

SCENE I 
OVERTURE-" We Are Three Roman Men" casca, cassius. brutus 

MUSIC BY SOUSA 

SCENE II 

"There'll be a Hot Time in Rome Tomorrow Night" 

brutus and conspirators 

"Quartet frcm Rigoletto-Sung by Two" portia and brutus 

music by verdi 

SCENE II* 

"Julius Caesar, Julius Caesar" (Clcmentine) calpurnia 

"Tomorrow is Ides of March". .("Toreador Song from Carmen" )..caesar 

music by bizet 

SCENE III 

"Duet from Juanita" brutus and Caesar 

"Hail Caesar" caesar's army 

SCENE IV 
"How Dry I Am" lucius 

"Jazzeroo" LUCIUS 

SCENE V 
"Thus Ends Our Play" antony 

music by mendelssohn 
FINALE-"Thus Ends Our Play" „ entire company 

music by mendelssohn 

MUSICAL ADVISOR - PROFESSOR HAUSKNECHT 
♦ • • 

Julius Caesar is owned and controlled by 

BLACKBURN and STURZEBECXER 
this play staged and produced under the personal direction 

OF 

RUSSELL STURZEBECKER 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 197 



College Pays Honor To Lost Aviator; 
Friars Establish Blackburn Trophy 



Former Athlete 
Meets Death In 
Naval Air Crash 

Led by President Charles S. 
Swope, West Chester faculty and 
students in a recent chapel pro- 
gram paid reverent tribute to 
Ensign George Nelson Blackburn, 
'39, who lost his life in an air 
tragedy while on active duty as 
an officer and pilot in the United 
States Naval Air Service. 

Blackburn and nine compan- 
ions were given up for lost when 
the wreckage of the ill-fated 
PBY-1 Naval Patrol bomber was 
found off the eastern shore of 
Virginia shortly before noon, 
April 9. Naval officials declared 
that the tragedy occurred during 
a storm over a mist-covered sea. 

Wrecked Near Norfolk 

The huge twin-motored bomb- 
er, piloted by Blackburn, was on 
a trip from Norfolk, Virginia, to 
Quonsett Point, R. I., when the 
accident occurred. Wreckage was 
found two miles east of the 
Great Machiponjo Inlet, about 
forty-five miles from the Navy- 
air base at Norfolk. 

Two weeks previous to the dis- 
aster, Blackburn was commis- 
sioned as an officer and assigned 
to the Norfolk base. 

The local graduate lived in 
Lenni Mills, Pa., and attended 
the Media High School. While at 
West Chester he worked in the 
Steward's Office and was active 
in athletics and other campus 
activities. 




George Blackburn 
. . . Crash Victim 

Courtesy Phila. Evening- Bulletin 



In Memoriam 

It is proper at this time 
that we should pause to pay 
tribute to the memory of a 
West Chester son who re- 
cently sacrificed his life in 
patriotic service and devo- 
tion to his country. The ac- 
count of the accidental tra- 
gedy of the United States 
Navy Bomber Patrol Plane, 
piloted by George N. Black- 
burn, is familiar to all. 

Mr. Blackburn was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1939. 
During his career at West 
Chester he was conspicuous 
in college activities as a 
member of the football team 
and assistant in the Stew- 
ard's Office. Always coura- 
geous, courteous, and friend- 
ly, we know, George faced 
his tragedy with a calm spi- 
rit and a joyous victory. 

"Death is not a foe, but an 
inevitable adventure." As 
George continues his adven- 
ture in the Great Beyond, his 
life and work will serve to 
inspire his friends to greater 
heights. May we stand for a 
moment in reverent and si- 
lent tribute to his memory. 

President Charles S. Swope 



Memorial Award 
Will Be Assigned 
To Trophy Case 

In memory of Ensign George 
Nelson Blackburn, who was re- 
ported killed in a recent airplane 
disaster while in the service of 
the United States Navy, it was 
announced yesterday by the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Friars, 
that a memorial sports trophy 
will be established. Blackburn 
was a member of the Friars or- 
ganization. 

The trophy will be presented 
each year to the championship 
team of the intramural basket- 
ball leagues. The name of the 
winning team will be inscribed 
on the cup, which will be placed 
in the college trophy case. 
Clark's Deserters, the winning 
team this year, will be the first 
to receive the reward. 

Blackburn, while in college, 
was an active athlete, participat- 
ing as a varsity player on the 
football team, the track team, 
and in intramural sports. He was 
also president of the Varsity 
Club in his senior year. Black- 
burn graduated in the Class of 
1939, and was a Health Educa- 
tion student. 



198 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Friday, May 7, 1937 



West Chester Celebrates May Day 
With All-Day Festivities Tomorrow 



South Campus To Be Center Of 

Activities ; Coronation Of Queen 

Feature; Sports In Morning 



DANCE IN EVENING 



MAY DAY PROGRAM 
10:00— Chapel on South Campus 
10:45-11:45 — Sports on Athletic 

Field 
12:00- 1:00— Luncheon on South 

Campus 
3:00 — May Day Pageant on South 

Campus 
6:00 — May Day Dinner, Dining 

Room 
8:00 — Dance, Recreation Hall, 
semi-formal 



May Day exercises will start at 10:00 
o'clock on Saturday morning. May 8. 
At that time classes will be dismissed 
and chapel exercises will be held on 
South Campus. After the chapel exer- 
cises there will be an hour of various 
sports activities on the athletic field; 
at 12 noon luncheon will be served out- 
of-doors, on South Campus. 

At 3 o'clock on South Campus, the 
pageant entitled "May Day Festival" 
will begin. Students representing the 
peoples of all nations are to be in the 
woods gathering flowers for the festival. 
Ladies with flowers will enter at the 
sound of a bugle. As the orchestra 
plays, some will dance, some will sing, 



and others will sell flowers to the spec- 
tators. 

Another blare of the bugle will herald 
the approach of the May Queen, Phyllis 
Andrews, and her court. When she 
reaches the throne, the Queen will be 
crowned by some distinguished person 
on campus. Following the coronation, 
there will be dances by the peoples of 
all nations in honor of the Queen. 

Ribbon Dance — Freshman Health Edu- 
cation girls and Academic girls gym II 
Bean Setting — Senior and Sophomore 

Health Education men. 
Milk Maids — Senior Health Education 

girls 
Sword Dance — Senior and Junior Health 

Education men 
Dutch Dance — Academic girls 
Wreath Dance — Junior Health Education 

girls 
Russian Dance — Academic girls II 
Ox Dance — Sophomore Health Education 

men 
Chimney Sweeps — Valkyrie Club 
Italian Dance — Academic students 
Gathering Peas Pods — Academic students 
May Pole Dance — Junior Health Educa- 
tion girls 

After the May Pole dance, the orches- 
tra will play the recessional; the Queen 
and her attendants will leave, followed by 
the peoples of all nations. 

At 6 o'clock, a May Day dinner-party 
will be held in the College Dining 
Room, to be followed at 8 o'clock by a 
May Day Dance in Recreation Hall. 
This whole program has been arranged 
by the members of the Senior Class. 




MAY DAY, 1937 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 199 



The Moore Literary Society 



Presents 

"ROSAMUNDE" 

A Pastoral Operetta in Two Acts 
J* 

Music by FRANZ SCHUBERT 
Book by ALEXANDER DEAN 

£0 



Wednesday, January, 26, 1938 

Eight-fifteen 



J* 



Produced by special arrangement with 
Silver, Burdett and Company 



Roberta Hargrave 
Marie Price 
Catherine Gerhard 
Aida D'Orazio 
Ruth Hughes 
Margaret Alber 
Emmy Lou Heavener 
Eleanor Klitsch 



Louise Bolton 
Mary Martin 
Madeline Smith 
Alethia Bair 
Mildred Slack 
Eleanor Herb 



Francis Marshall 
Albert Will 
Robert Snyder 



Betty Molish 
Louis 3 Lupkin 
Judy Moatz 



Seymour Baderak 
David Kozinsky 
John Grysky 
Charlotte Henry 
Nicholas Rintye 



SHEPHERDS' CHORUS 
Betty Ann Leaver 
Mary Ann Wagner 
Louise Pello 
Betty Gilmour 
Marie Bair 
Jack Frick 
Thomas Triol 
Joseph Cochran 

COURT CHORUS 

Mary Pretz 
Betty Jane Hummel 
Naomi Levengood 
Dorothy Clearwater 
James Johnson 
Jack MacNab 



Edward Wroblewski Betty Fluck 



Philip Palmer 
Tony Ingram 
Anna Mae Erb 
Mary Buchholz 
Thomas Middleton 
Lenard Laubach 



SCENES 

ACT 1. Before the cottage of Aja — a late afternoon 
in May. 

ACT 2. Throne Room in the Royal Palace — evening, 
three days later. 

PLACE: The Island of Cyprus. 

TIME: Long ago. 
Directors: Miss Margaret A. Kreisher 

Mr. Powell Middleton 
Dancing: Betty Molish 
Stage Manager: James Shook 
Costumes: Cora Benner 
Pianist: Esther Hoffman 
President of Moore Society: E. Paul Giersch 



Thomas Zerbe 
Robert McGary 
Philip Sargeant 
Robert Auman 
Mr. Edw. Zimmer 
Mr. Arthur Jones 

CAST 



Joseph Bowman 
Jack Blace 
Carlton Wood 
Walter Kealey 
William Grysky 
Peter Marcantonio 
Robert Jeffries 



Emil Rusinko 
Leroy Brendlinger 
Roger Gerhard 
Harold Domchick 
Harold Nordstrom 



GUARDS 

Robert Pedlow 
Jack Frick 
Milton Coombs 

DANCING CHORUS 

Edna Britten 
Thomas Triol 
Charles Downin 

ORCHESTRA 

Henry Neubert 
Russel Kunkle 
Helen Price 
Phyllis Reitheimer 
Alice Frey 



Elwood Hitchcock 
Lincoln Ross 



Jack MacNab 



Doris Thompson 
John Mclntyre 
Maxwell Jarvis 
Donald Mease 
William Moore 
Robert Barber 
Earl Mays 
Leroy Wilson 
Ralph Eberly 
Clayton Moore 
Elwood Hochstetter 



Frederick, Prince of Candia Robert Hunt 

Rosamunde, Shepherdess Christina Wheaton 



Fulgentius, King of Cyprus 

Albanus, Lord of Cyprus 

Benedict, Lord of Cyprus 
Leonardo, Lord of Cyprus 
Hermina, Daughter of Fulgentius 
Aja, Foster-Mother of Rosamunde 

Baucis, Shepherdess 

Philemon, Shepherd Arthur Walter 

Philander, Shepherd Howard Jordon 



Jack Williamson 

. . . Galen Herr 

Alexander Davit 

Ralph Miller 

Olive Hartman 

Ruth Becker 

Vera Gambal 



200 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Friday, March 18, 1938 

Olympic Club 
Scores As 
Phillips Paces 
Talented Show 

By Ken Shotts 

For the third time in as many 
years the Ehinger Gymnasium rang 
with the plaudits accorded the inter- 
nationally famous Chet Phillips and 
his host, the Olympic Club of West 
Chester State, as the local clubmen 
presented their annual gymnasic ex- 
hibition and dance here last Saturday 
evening. 

Phillips, a former Temple Univer- 
sity star and intercollegiate champion 
who represented the U. S. in the 1936 
Olympiad at Berlin, was joined by 
Joe Hewlett, his former teammate, 
and current Owl captain, in pacing 
one of the smoothest gymnastic per- 
formances ever put on in the College's 
new Gym. 

Women's Efforts Please 

Contributing in no small measure 
to the successful evening, the efforts 
of five comely misses from the 
women's phys-ed department were 
well received by the sell-out crowd on 
hand. Completing the guest star 
card, Chris Sanderson, a member of 
the Class of '00 and a prominent 
Chester County citizen, added a 
clever Indian Club and torch-swinging 
act to the interesting program. Mr. 
Sanderson was a pupil of Dr. Ehinger, 
the health education pioneer here, 
whose name the new gym perpetuates. 

A born showman, Phillips com- 
pletely captured his audience as he 
performed with perfect form on every 
piece of apparatus. Starting with a 
remarkable tumbling show on the 



mats, through difficult combinations 
on the rings, horizontal and parallel 
bars, he thrilled the spectators con- 
tinually with his feats of daring and 
his true artistry, all the while clearly 
demonstrating his mastery of every 
piece of equipment in the house. 

The evening's activities were com- 
menced by three well-executed com- 
bines by mixed pairs on the mats. 
Peggy Thomas and Ding Forwood 
opened the program, and were follow- 
ed by graceful performances on the 
part of Helen Replogle and Charley 
Downin, and Nan Hewett and Bob 
Lomax. Men's doubles saw Forwood 
and Downin in a good specialty act. 

Clowns Take Over 

West Chester's all-around ace, the 
sophomore star Johnny Tasso, helped 
Phillips make his bow when he joined 
the erstwhile Temple great in a tricky 
mat presentation replete with intricate 
flips. Phillips polished his efforts off 
with a beautiful front flip with a half 
turn. 

Almost before anyone could stop 
them, the gym was beseiged midway 
in the performance, by a covy of 
corny clowns with Mike Wyatt at the 
helm. Mike entered perched atop 
a unicycle and proved to be an 
able general for the comic army that 
included Pappy Ramsdell, Mike 
Doyle, Neal Trego, Harold Frace, 
Paul Bruno, Hugs Miller, and Johnny 
Windish, in its ranks. 

Toby Dorazzio was perhaps the 
outstanding performer among the 
capable women gymnasts present. 
The sophomore miss gave a daring 
exhibition on the flying rings as did 
Olive Hartman. Misses Thomas, 
Dorazzio, and Hartman also worked 
ably on the parallels while Miss 
Dorazzio turned in a nice combination 
on the side horse. 



Joe Hewlett Scores 

Performing on the high bar in 
addition to Phillips, who claims this 
apparatus as his especial forte, was 
Mike Doyle, Harry Thaete, Johnny 
Tasso, and Doug Carr. All gave 
creditable account of themselves with 
Carr probably leading the West 
Chester contingent. 

Joe Hewlett, who had annexed 
two first places in the afternoon 3 s 
his Temple team-mates vanquishtd 
Princeton in their gym meet at 
Philadelphia, still retained sufficient 
energy to please the crowd with his 
combinations on the rings, parallels 
and side-horse; the last three events 
on the program. His iron cross on the 
rings was particularly impressive 
Jack MacNab staged a breath-taking 
blindfold act on the flying rings 
culminating in a fly-away, that earned 
him a well-deserved hand. Tommy 
Triol, Bill Bean, Forwood and Thaete 
were the other Purple and Gold men 
to participate in the ring event. 

Vernon Shellenberger, Triol, and 
Doyle, joined Hewlett and Phillips 
on the side-horse. West Chester's 
parallel artists were Johnny Eubank, 
Downin, Bean, Carr, Thaete, Tasso, 
and Forwood. Carr and Thaete also 
staged a smooth team act on the 
double bars. 

The exhibition was under the 
supervision of Harry R. Allen, club 
advisei and head of the College's 
health and physical education de- 
partment, and Earle C. Waters, 
mentor of the Ram gym team. Music 
for the successful dance that followed 
was provided by the College Criterions 
whose augmented band had accom- 
panied the performers throughout the 
exhibition. The men of the frosh 
health-ed section served as ushers. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 201 




Kront Row— left to right— Tasso. Miller. Slicllenl>LT!.'cr. MacNab. Cair. Dim-nin. I'orwooil (Captain). G>.,ch Waters. 
Hack Row -left to right— Kuluinli. Dovle. Tliaetc, Triol. Mavs. 





202 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

WEST CHESTER 

PRESENTS 

A MAY DAY FESTIVAL 

SATURDAY. MAY 14, 19S8 
ARRANGED BY THE 

JUNIOR CLASS AND THE ART. ENGLISH. 

HEALTH EDUCATION. AND MUSIC DEPARTMENTS 

THEME. 

as old as the history of wr i tten language is 
the record of wan ' s rejoicing in the miracle 
of spring. Lyric outbursts universally re- 
curring MYTHS OF DEATH AND REBIRTH, DIGNI- 
FIED ODES EY POET LAUREATES AND SHOUTS OF GLEE 
FROM LITTLE CHILDREN WEAVE TOGETHER IN THE 
DANCE OF JOY THAT GREETS THE AWAKENING OF THE 
YEAR. THE PRETTY CUSTOM OF GATHERING May 

flowers and weaving garlands to deck the young 
girl chosen to reign over the festival, and of 
offering them to her with dance and song, has 
grown up in many countries over many years. 
May Day on our campus is not pretentiously 
celebrated, but here and now, for one day at 
least the spirit of springtide is so real and 
spontaneous that we ask only that you carry 
away with you the remembrance of youths dancing 
on the green in the sunlight, with smiles on 1 
their lips to f i nd an answer in your own hearts, 
through the year. 

Cordially yours 
Charles S. Swope 

President 



COMMITTEE ON ARRANGEMENTS- 
Mary Luuise Lupkin, Chairman 



Dr. James Andes Miss Lois Clark Mr. p 0W ell Middleton 

Miss Eleanor Aldworth John Clinch Virginia Page 

Robert Auman Miss Marion Farnham Miss Dorothy Ramsey 

George Blackburn Kathryn Jamison j ane c. Richter 

Alethia Bair Helen J. Kennedy Miss Anne Schaub 

Ruth Boyd Miss Muriel Leach Miss Eleanor Starkey 

Harold McSparron Miss Myra Wade 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 203 



Dutch Dance oe,v, School Cr-n ldRE.*I 

ScvE * J'.:mPS Se-:::-p Health lt>, Gro^p 

Bean Setting J^x.c^ Grcuf 

>\ACA bENIOtv hEALTH CD, IrRCUP 

Dutch Dance F^eskvam Health Ed. Group 

Hankerckief Dance Scfhq.vd-.e Iv'.jSij Grcuf 

Fryksdalspclska Junior Health Ed. Group 

Kerry Dance Senior Music C-r : up 

Oxdansen Junior Group 

Dance of the Atheletes Modern Dance Group of tY.A.A. 

Sfanish Da^ce Junior Health Ed, Group 

Soloist Betty Polish 

Country Da^ce Modern Dance Group of W.A.A. 

Wreath Dance Freshman Health Ed., Group 

May Pole Dance Freshv.an <S Cophcmcre Academic Group 

Sellengers Round All Groups 

Crowning of the Queen 

Trumpeters- 
Peter Marcantonia William Moyer 
David Closson Wesley Rhodes 
John Grycky Robert Wallace 

May Queen Phyllis Kallenbach 

Maid of Honor Sophia Flaga 

May Queen's Court- 
Mary Martin Marjorie Patton 
Anna Mcnaghan Blanche Althouse 
Pearl Brotzman Marjorie Stoltzfus 
Mary Jane Herr Janet Sonneborn 

Crown Bearer David Graham 

Flower Girls and Boys- 
Joan Atweil Gibbons Cornwell 
John Bair Mary Anne Phillips 
David Barrett Peter Shaw 
Jean Cooper Dianne Zimmer 



204 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Standing, left to right — Drozd. Triol. Kirk. Manager Taccarino. Carr. Price. Mays 
Seated, left to right — Thaete. Captain Eubank. Trego 



17 MARCH 1939 



Olympic Clubmen Impress In 
Annual Gymnastic Exhibition 



Before a near capacity crowd 
at the Ehinger Gym last Satur- 
day night, the Olympic Club, 
premier gymnasts of the college, 
presented their annual Olympic 
Club Exhibition and Dance. 

Dr. Allen, head of the physical 
education department of'the college, 
acted as master of ceremonies for the 
event and presented a varied program 
which found great favor with the size- 
able audience. Following the intro- 
duction of the club members by Dr. 
Allen. Toby D'Orazio. Mary Dotter. 
Kay Keenan, and Gwen Clymer open- 
ed the proceedings with a smart 
military tap dance. Dorothy Bendigo 
accompanied them on the piano. 

Eugene Drozd and Earl Mays then 
followed with an exhibition of tum- 
bling. Eleanor Weisner added a touch 
of feminine grace to the event with 
her interpretations. Toby D'Orazio, 
Mary Jane Spidle, Don Kirk. Harry 
Thaete, and Kenneth Price offered 
several exercises on both the still and 
flying rings. Doris Corvin punc- 
tuated the acrobatic proceedings with 
a novelty toe dance. 



Thomas Triol. Eugene Drozd. Har- 
ry Thaete, and Toby D'Orazio follow- 
ed with exercises on the horse. Xor- 
man Bordman. member of Temple 
University's freshman gym team, 
also accompanied the Olympic Club 
members in this event and later 
assisted in exercises on the horizontal 
and "parallel bars. 

Two older members of rhe Phila- 
delphia Turngemein. Mr. Frederic 
Miller and Mr. John Mays, astonished 
the audience with their versatility 
on both the horizontal and parallel 
bars. 

With "Pappy" Nye assuming the 
role of a strong man. the fine art of 
pyramid building was demonstrated 
by other members of the physical 
ecucition curriculum. Frank Tac- 
carino's "Oswald" failed to function 
as per schedule with several amusing 
results. 

A series of still life pictures con- 
cluded the program after which the 
College Criterions took over and sup- 
plied the music for dancing, which 
occupied the remainder of the eve- 
ning's program. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 205 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

West Chester, Pa. 

Saturday, May 13, 1939 




Presents Its 

"ANNUAL MAY DAY FEST I VA L " 

Sponsored by the Junior Class and 
presented with the cooperation of 
the Art, Engiish, and Health Edu- 
cation, and Music Departments. 
THEME 

The miracle of spring has been 

greeted m many countries and in many u/ays. 
Today, we greet the beauty of spring with 
the grace and fun of our .'Jay Olympics ■ The 
eternal fire of youth and joy burns bright 
as each competes with songs i nd dances, as 
spontaneous as the spirit of spring itself. 
Our. Queen is judge, and to her is brought 
each small gift of grace and movement . The 
laurel wreath of victory is joy and happy 
laughter. Laugh with us,- sing with us, and 
welcome spring ! 



MAY DAY PAGEANT 

Wayne Field at 7 P.M. 

PROGRAM 

Now is the Month of Maying. . . Girls' Chorol Groups 

Queen's Procession 

Minuet May Queen's Court 

Crowning of ths Queen Phyllis KalleAboch 

. . .May Queen., 1928 

Lighting of Torch Olympic Runner 

There's Music in the Air. . . . Girls' Choral Groups 
Sicilian Circles All Groups 

Dances of All Countries 

Old Mole (English) Junior Health Eds . 

Hungarian Dance Senior Health Eds. 

French Dance Freshman Academic Group 

Dutch Dance . . .Freshman Health Eds. 

Spanish Dance Sophomore Music Grcup 

Danish Dance Freshman Academic Group 

Slavic Dance Freshmen Academic Group 

English Wreath Dance Y.V/.C.A. Group 

Irish Dance Junior Health Eds. 

Russian Dance Sophomore Health Eds. 

German Dance Freshman Academic Group 

American Dance Junior Health Eds. 

Japanese Parasol Dnnce. .Freshman Academic Group 

May Pole Dances Senior Men and Wornen 

Freshman Academic Groups 

Demonstraticn School Children 

Finale of American Dances All Groups 



9:00 P.M May Day Dance 

Ehinger Gymnasium 



206 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



State Teachers College 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 



1. SQUARE DANCES. Lionel Nowak 

Choreography by DORIS HUMPHREY 
Lead Couple. .DORIS HUMPHREY and CHARLES WEIDMAN 

Second Couple Eva Desca and Lee Sherman 

Third Couple Beatrice Seckler and William Matons 

Fourth Couple Harriette Anne Gray and Jose Limon 

2. TRADITIONS Lehman Engel 

Choreography by CHARLES WEIDMAN 
CHARLES WEIDMAN Jose Limon William Matons 



PRESENTS 

DORIS HUMPHREY 
CHARLES WEIDMAN 

AND COMPANY 



LIONEL NOWAK 

Pianist 



PHILIPS MEMORIAL 

Tuesday Evening, March 19, 1940 

8:15 o'clock 



3. PASSACAGLIA IN C MINOR__Johann Sebastian Bach 

Choreography by DORIS HUMPHREY 

DORIS HUMPHREY Jose Limon and Company 

INTERMISSION 



4. OPUS 51 Vivian Fine 

Choreography by CHARLES WEIDMAN 

Opening Dance CHARLES WEIDMAN and Company 

March CHARLES WEIDMAN, Jose Limon, 

Lee Sherman and William Matons 

Commedia Lee Sherman and Company 

SOLO CHARLES WEIDMAN 

Dust Harriette Anne Gray, Beatrice Seckler 

Spectacle CHARLES WEIDMAN and Company 

5. THE SHAKERS Drum, Accordion and Voice 

Choreography by DORIS HUMPHREY 
DORIS HUMPHREY, CHARLES WEIDMAN and Company 

Members of the Company: Beatrice Seckler, Harriette Anne Gray, Eva 
Desca, Marie Maginnis, Gloria Garcia, Nona Schurman, Josephine 
Luckie, Jose Limon. Lee Sherman, William Matons. 



NOTES ON THE PROGRAM 



SQUARE DANCES: A gay suite of familiar dances in the spirit of a 
party. There is a square dance which keeps coming in like a refrain, 
and duets for each couple including a country dance, a tango, a schot- 
tische and a waltz. Neither the steps nor the figures have more than 
a nodding acquaintance with the originals, — they are, in fact, inven- 
tions, like variations on an old folk song, the spirit of dancing together 
for fun. 

TRADITIONS: "Show how a habit of thought resists change, and 
how after a fruitless struggle to keep alive, is scarcely dead before its 
place is taken by another habit of thought equally dominating. Here 
is a high development of a brilliant and useful choreographic medium 
. . .non-representational pantomime." 

PASSACAGLIA (A musical form similar to variations on a ground 
bass). This dance is known technically as an abstraction, which is high- 
ly misleading as a tiil?. Actually, each movement and each phrase is 
dramatic in origin. The dancers are expressing moods here — at one 
time it is heroic courage in the face of adversity, at another it is light- 
headedness. Sometimes, as in the fugue, various individuals start up 
from the crowd as though stating a belief. The mistake is to look for 
a dramatic story any more than one would look for it in a symphony. 
What holds the whole composition together is the tragi-pathetic melody, 
repeated from beginning to end, like the credo of one who clings to a 
simple faith. 



OPUS 51: This is a ballet evolved in terms of movement instead of 
drama. OPENING DANCE serves to introduce the dancers. MARCH 
follows and modulates the balanced atmosphere created by Opening 
Dance into COMMEDIA which is improvisational in form and seeks to 
ridicule and satirize. The themes have no relation to each other and 
deal with such subjects as a man taking a shower, an evangelist in 
action, a woman cleaning house. SOLO and DUET modulate Com- 
media to the last dance. SPECTACLE is naive and acrobatic in inten- 
tion and suggests ideas and movements which border on the spectacular. 

THE SHAKERS were a religious people who had numerous 
colonies in the United States during the 19th century. They 
believed that sin was something tangible like a liquid poison that could 
be shaken out of the body. To this end they held meetings of a 
Sunday in which they danced fervently and long, shaking their hands, 
feet and head to be cleansed of this mortal curse. Men and women 
danced on opposite sides of the meeting house and never crossed the 
center line. Also in the service were songs, and sometimes one of the 
members would cry out as the hysteria became more intense, or exhort 
the others to destroy the devil and make themselves clean. In the 
dancer's expression of this scene all these elements are used — they 
dance, they speak, they sing. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 207 



15 MARCH 1940 



"Wayne Hall Follies" Inaugurated 
Saturday; Jordan And WoodStar 



Gardiner Writes 
AndDirectsShow; 
Roach Featured 



"With Carlton Wood and 
"Din" Jordan heading a 
cast of sixty men, the 
"Wayne Hall Follies" 
will be "presented by the Varsity 
Club tonight at 8:00 p. m. in the 
Chapel. Following the show, 
there will be a dance in the Eh- 
inger Gym. 

John Gardiner, who is author 
and director of the musical com- 
edy, Sam Cozzi, Ralph Eberly, 
and Don Mease have composed 
the music; Harlan Keating has 
coached the dance routines that 
the "Rockettes" will perform, 
and "Soapy" Moore will act as 
master of ceremonies for the 
show. 

Charlie Roach Sings 

The Varsity Club has secured 
Charles Roach, of Wayne Hall, to 
sing a parody on Shame, Shame 
on Old Notre Dame. Members of 
the cast have undergone strenu- 
ous rehearsals so that their spe- 
cialty and novelty numbers will 
meet with approval. A scene 
from "Gone With The Wind," 
impersonations of Grace Moore, 
the Andrew Sisters, Nelson Eddy 
and Jeanette McDonald are only 
a few of the many attractions. 

Joe Gormley and George Rob- 
inson are co-chairmen of the 
committee. The only feminine 
assistance which the show has 
received is in the make-up com- 
mittee, headed by Lola Jane 
Adams and Betty Goddell. 

The College Criterions will 
play throughout the show and 
at the dance which follows. 



Wayne Hall Follies. 
On the Way 



21 MARCH 1940 

Wayne Hall 
Follies Score 
First Success 

The Varsity Club initiated 
the first annual "Wayne 
Hall Follies" on Saturday 
evening in the Philips Me- 
morial Auditorium. Written 
and directed by John Gar- 
diner, the play concerned the 
inability of Jack Frost, played 
by Din Jordan, to derive pro- 
fits from his uncle's farm. The 
suggestion of transforming the 
old place into a night club by 
Violet, amusingly impersonated 
by Carlton Wood, was satisfac- 
torily carried out until the uncle 
arrived. 

The uncle, enacted by John 
Smith, furious at first, finally 
approved of the night club when 
one cf the chorines persuaded 
bim to. sing and dance the 
"Cokey Cola." 

As Master of Ceremonies at 
the night club, "Soapy" Moore 
presented the floor show enter- 
tainers which included such fa- 
miliar personalities as Joe Bell 
as Grace Moore, Milton Kalick- 
man as Jussi Bjoerling, Steve 
Partel as Jeanette McDonald, 
John Gardiner as Carmen Lom- 
bardo, Roger Mauer as Maj 



Mowbray, 
James Burnish and Glenn Miller 
as the Andrew Sisters. 

Hitler Attends 

Patronizing the famous night 
club were Adblph Hitler (Edward 
Walls), Neville Chamberlain 
(Don Mease), Bill Tilden 

(Charles Gallagher) , Guy Lom- 
bardo (Robert McMullen) , and 
Alexander Woollcott (Bill Wil- 
heim) . 

The inimitable Charles Roach 
was loudly applauded for his 
parody on kotre Dame's fight 
song. 

Interspersing the two-act com- 
edy, a highly mimicked scene 
from "Gone With The Wind" 
was presented with Harland 
Keating as Scarlett O'Hara, Jay 
Smith as Rhett Butler and 
Frank Taccarino as Mammy. 

Original Songs Featured 

The show featured four origi- 
nal songs which were written by 
Don Mease and Sam Cozzi, who 
offered their hit, Strange As It 
Seems; John Gardiner, whose 
composition, Cokey Cola, was 
sung and danced by the twelve 
"Rockettes"; Ralph Eberly, The 
Waiter's Song; and Bill Slaugh- 
ter, whose ballad, Some Day, was 
sung by "Din" Jordan. George 
Robinson served as general com- 
mittee manager for the produc- 
tion. 

Following the show, a dance 
was held in the Ehinger Gym. 
Music for the show and dance 
was played by the College Cri- 
terions. 




NO EARL CARROL BEAUTIES-*^ J" ^ 

Freudenheim. Horn. Green, Guidici, 



Suj-dam. 



£S%ssft3r s^* c.„.„,,eu. ™, Sco 

Conturso. and White doing: a pontine ™ ol ° °» 



208 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Vasso, Rudman, Drozd, B'adfcrd, Mays, Mgr. Taccarino 
Tr;ol, Carr, Kirk, Cap: Thaete, Wails. Abrams 



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Left to riirht Charles L. Graham, B.P.E.. M.A. 
Earle C. Wales, B.S.. M.Ed.; Llovd II. Lux. A.B 
M.Ed. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 209 



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212 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



■";-;:;>■ ;:';:;>:;V;,..;V; : :;;;>.-v:-: 





HERMAN VOLUNTEER (DA HERO) 

"Herman Volunteer" or, as you probably know him, "Din" 
Jordan, is playing the leading male role in the Varsity Club Show 
for the second consecutive year. Din, senior secondary student, has 
distinguished himself on campus as editor of the football program 
for the past two years and as one of the soloists of the Men's Glee 
Club. He also served as track manager in 1939, and as co-manager 
with Walter Way in 1940. This year he Is to serve in an advisory 
capacity. In addition to his role in the show, he has assisted in 
its technical production and in the publicity direction. 




Sweet and Lovely 

From left to right are: Allan Freudenheim, a chorine; Frank 
Taccarino, who appears as "Grace"; Rick McMullen, who gives 
a sizzling performance as "Lily, Hot from Chile"; and Robert 
Forney, who portrays the irresistible heroine, "Betty Foods." 



THE GIRLS OF THE CHORUS 

Never let it be said that Wayne Hall has not produced her 
(or should we say "his"> share of dancing "cuties. This year's 
Follies chorus disproves any such talk with fifteen high-stepping, 
hip-swinging, sweet young things who strut their stuff in the Uncle 
Sam and La Conga numbers. 

Seriously, though, trying to teach fifteen husky lads the 
secrets hitherto known only to real chorus lassies has been a terrific 
task. George Gottshall, leading authority on the terpsichordean 
art, has done a fine job as have the members of the chorus. 

The chorus consists of fifteen men — count them. There are 
Monk Umstead, Billy Green, Al White, Al Freudenheim, Joe Con- 
turso, Bill Suydam, and Paul Phillips from the football squad; Buzz 
Leith, George Gottshall, Snuffy Lynch, and Paul Horn from the 
soccer team; Joe Gormley and Bob Thomas from the track team; 
Jim Guidici from the wrestling team; and Soupy Campbell (pride 
of the music department) from the tennis team. Also shown is 
John Kizawick who, since the picture was taken, has been called 
on to a greater task: that of personally directing the drilling of 
the draftees at the beginning of the show. 

Not shown in this picture are the "dancing dictators": Max 
Baker, "the Tokio representative"; George Gottshall, "Herr Hitler"; 
Bill Green, "Benito Mussolini"; and "Doggy" Twardowski, genial 
"Uncle Joe Stalin." 

Robert Forney, who is playing the role of "Betty Foods," is 
another of the Men's Glee Club soloists. In this show, however, he 
illustrates his versatility and good sportsmanship by acting as the 
leading lady. His rollicking soprano voice has been rolling the 
boys in the aisles. 

Joe Bell and Frank Taccarino, whose names on the stage are 
"Bullett Gangster" and "Grace," provide a comedy love interest. 
"Taccy's" dulcet tones have softened Joe's heart so much that the 
feeling behind "Bullett's" lines is truly sincere. Little wonder that 
Joe, seeing his true love departing from him in one of the play's 
more tragic moments, breaks down and in a nostalgic tremolo bids 
his love, "Good-bye and come again never." 

Ahhh — drama!!! 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 213 



31 JANUARY 1941 



Chorines Of 
Wayne Spark 
Follies Of '41 

By Philip Eberly 

Highlighted by "Six --Lessons 
from Madame La Goonga," a 
song hit of tomorrow, the 1941 
edition of Wayne Hall Follies 
will have its premiere March 1. 

So stated Director John Gar- 
diner as he previewed briefly the 
progress on "The Adventures of 
Johnny Conscripted." This show, 
using the vital defense topic, will 
be the best Varsity Club show 
yet according to Gardiner, who 
with his staff of co-producers 
and co-directors have completed 
one week of rehearsals. Like the 
"Follies of '40," this year's saga 
of "Johnny Conscripted" will be 
enacted by Wayne Hall residents. 

Charles (Remember Me at the 
Varsity Club Dance) Roach will 
step out of his usual role as ora- 
tor and provide tap dancing an- 
tics as a feature of the event. 
In addition to Mr. Roach will be 
a cast of forty-two performers. 
Among these will be a famous 
Gardiner creation of an Earl 
Carrol type — fourteen lovely 
chorines. 

A new feature of this year's 
"Follies" will be the staging 
with complete new costumes, 
necessitated by the conscription 
theme. 

Five big, new song hits make 
their debut in the production. 
Earl Mays writing the music and 
Director Gardiner the lyrics 
have composed numbers on the 
order of "Uncle Sam You Got 
My Man." 

Following the first night show- 
ing of "The Adventures of 
Johnny Conscripted" there will 
be a dance in Ehinger Gym. 

•Friday, -February 28, 1941 
Forward, March 



The biggest social event of the month seems 
to be none other than Wayne Hall Follies, that 
stupendous, spectacular array of campus pulchri- 
tude, knotty limbs, croaking sopranos and bathing 
(less) beauties. John Gardiner's beefing trust 
promises a bigger and better production than ever 
before. Emcee Charles Roach has had his lines 
memorized since September . 



21 FEBRUARY 1941 



Wayne Hall Follies of 1941 
Feature Five Smash Song Hits 



By Philip Eberly 
The song's the thing! Perhaps 
that is not the way the drama- 
tists would say it, but for the 
Wayne Hall Follies of '41, the 
scng's the thing. 

With this fact in view first 
nighters may prepare to witness 
the 1941 edition of the annual 
Varsity Club show March 1. The 
popular event held each year 
will be strengthened by the ex- 
pert musical settings of this 
year's event. Earle Mays and 
John Gardner have cooperated 
to produce five smash songs 
which should add greatly to the 
success of the Follies of '41. 



"The Moon and I" follows with 
a romantic setting. "Beautiful 
Waltz" completes the quintet of 
hits of tomorrow. 

Gardner Comments 

"The music for the show will 
be the greatest since 'Swanee 
River' hit Broadway," stated 
John Gardner, as he paused in 
his busy duties as co-director of 
the show. Gardner added that 
the intended effect of the songs 
will be interpreted by a dancing 
chorus of Wayne Hall "beauties" 
in dazzling, new costumes. 

That the importance of the 
South American situation has 
necessitated the importation of 
outlive Miss Lilly, hot from Chile, _was 
"Uncle stressed by Gardner. "We feel 
Sam, You Took My Man" heads that the use of the Latin beauty 
the music repertory of the show, will help bridge the gap between 
the theme of which is built the two Americas," he said. Miss 
around the trials and tribula- Lilly will depart for her native 
tions of Johnny Conscriptee. The land immediately after the show 
next number, "I Don't Want to The entire personnel of the 
Dictate," typifying the versatility show will complete endless re- 
of the co-writers, is character- hearsals, board meetings, and 



Songs Lasting 

The songs scored will 
West Chester mortality. 



ized by its subtle tone color ef- 
fect. The third composition from 
the pens of the West Chester 
combination is somewhat on the 
mathematical side; it is titled 
"Counting the Days Again." Re 



script writing some time next 
week. Tickets for the show, 
which includes such leading 
characters as Charlie Roach and 
Joe Bell, will go on sale soon. A 
dance will be included in the 



gardless of its familiar theme, price of admission 



Friday, March 7,. 1941 

When bigger and better follies are produced 
Wayne Hall will produce them. The glorified 
chorus was one that Ziegfeld must have dreamed 
about a thousand times and he most likely would 
have parted with his wisdom teeth for an oppor- 
tunity to work with a bevy of such beauties. As 
long as we're being lavish with our praise we 
might as well sling an extra orchid at that lovely 
import from Chile, the one and only Lily. Con- 
sidering everything, Saturday night was tops in 
the entertainment line. The only thing missing 
was "Husky" Roberts. Wonder just what we have 
to do to get his attention . . . Franny De Ceasaris 
really cashed in. Just to polish everything off. 
she had one of the smoothest dancing partners 
of the evening. Too bad Johnny Gardiner doesn't 
bat out a follies every month. 



214 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Dear Alumni and Friends: February 18] 1941 

The Circus is coming to 'West Chester State Teachers 
College again after a lapse of several years* It is a 
Physical Education Demonstration which enlists one hundred 
percent participation by students and faculty of the 
Department of Health and Physical Education. This year's 
Circus is to come during the weekend of March Tifte.'nth. 

At past Circus performances many of our friends have beon 
turned away at the door for lack of space to accommodate them. 
This year, therefore; we are having an advance ticket sale for 
our alumni and friends for the performande of Saturday evening, 
March fifteenth. 

This special advance ticket sale for you will last until 
the supply of tickets for this performance is exhausted, or 
until March sixth. Any tickets remaining after March sixth 
will be put on advance sale to our students who wish them for 
their friends and relatives. 

Tickets are forty cents each, tax included. Send checks 
or money orders, plus a stampe d self -addressed envelope for 
reply, to MISS E LIZABE TH ZlMffiRLlT "STATE TEA(ThTr S~ C^LEGE^~ 
WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA . 

We should like to have you come to the Circus. But, 
if you want to oome, and get in, be sure to have your tickets 
beforehand. No door sale of tickets is anticipated. All tiokets 
are for specific performances. Saturday night is Alumni Night, 

HARRY R. ALLEN Very sincerely yours, 

Director of Health and 

Physical Education* 






^i^^y /f {Z££^S 



General Connittecs 



1. Publicity ; Mr. Allen, Kiss Aldnorth, Elvira Barkasy, John Day. 

2. Tickets: Mr. Allen, Kiss Zinnorli. 

3. Decorations and lighting ; Mr. Lux, Sdna T7itnan, Florence Young, 

Harland Keating, Paul Price. 

4. Costumes and Properties ; (excluding settings and decorations for gymnasium): 

Miss Schaub and staff members, Margareb r>eler, Prances Facklcr, 
Betty Krida, Marion Patrick, Robert ::..-.;% Clement Elank, 
William Ward. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 215 







FINAL CIRCUS P. 


ROG 


BAM 1940-1941 


1. 




ANNOUNCEMENT BY RINGMASTER 




24. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


2. 




PARADE —FOLLOW ORDER OF PROGRAM 


25. 


HHUM3A 


3. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 




26. 


DANCE (DEM. SCHOOL) 


4. 




PYRAMIDS 




27. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


5. 




TA2E-0FF ON PYRAMIDS 




28. 


STEP DANCE 


6. 




ALL ANIMAL ACTS 




29. 


CLOWN NUMBER (REMOVE STEPS) 


7. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 




30. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


8. 




APPARATUS 




31. 


POTPOURRI 


9. 




SWINGING CLOWN 




32. 


CLOWN FENCERS 


10. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 




33. 


STATUES 


11. 




JUMP ROPE AND INDIAN CLUBS 




34. 


COMIC STATUES AND CLOITIT DIVING 


12. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 




35. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


13. 




COWBOY DANCE 




36. 


TUMBLING 


14. 




LARIATS AND BOXING 




37. 


BURLESQUE TUMBLING 


15. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 




38. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


16. 




HALF-AND-HALF DANCE 




39. 


ROLLER SKATING 


17. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 






(Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara) 


18. 




CHAIR DANCE 




40. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


19. 




AUTOMOBILE ACT 




41. 


ROLLER SKATING 


20. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 






(Snow Man) 


21. 




MILITARY TAP DANCE 




42. 


FINALS 


22. 




ALICE NICHOL (DEM. SCHOOL) 








23. 




COMEDY BASEBALL 






**»* 


Frogran 


Nuribors 








1. 


Hins 


Master: Jay Snith 








2. 


Pyrm 


".ids: Mr. Waters, Miss Leach. 


Ru 


th Wentz, Alhcrta Mann, Harold Matesky, 






Richard Youn/ 1 ;, Fror,h'-.en 


nen and 


.7or.en. 


3. 


Apparatus: Mr. Waters, Douplus Car: 


j. 


Thwm 


Triol, r.en stuients. 


4. 


Junp 


Rope and Balls: Ethel Alans, J; 
Sophonore nonen. 


ne 


Pyle, 


Mar;' Dottor, Freshnen and 


5. 


Statues: Mr. Lux and Mr. Grahan, 


Kenneth 


Matz, Harry McClister, 






Sophonore nen.. 








6. 


Danes 


3s: Miss Wade, Miss Sjiranib, 


Tohy D'Orazio, Elvira Barkasy, Rose Greco, 



Arthur Farley, Willian Van Buskirk, Selcctad nen and rronen fror. 
all classes. 



7. Tunblinft: 



Mr. Waters, Miss Leach, Madeline Stitely, Helen Nickish, Marjoiie 
Barknan, Richard Webster, Willian Maurer, Selected nen and ucr.it-n 
fron all classes. 



8. Skating : Miss Leach, Miss Zinnerli, Frances Fackler, Pauline Gaunor, Gvcn 

Clyner, Ronaino Attick, Charles Gal lather, Joseph Salvo, Boh M»t* t 

9. End Nunoer3 :Mr. Grrhan, Nan Kenitt, Gertrudo Snowdon, Stephen Partel, Siheei 

Mowbray, Jesse Benyish, Joseph Conturso, Boyd Stauffer, Ted Cleurk 



216 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



14 MARCH 1941 



Circus Comes 
To College 
Here Tonight 

"Big Show" Opens Two- 

Night Stand in 

Gym. 



STUDENTS TO PERFORM 

Stealing a march on the still 
hibernating troupers of the sawdust 
eircuit, the first "circus" of the 
year — complete with clowns, acro- 
bats, bands, bareback riders, living 
statues, dancers, and all the rest 
— opens a two-night stand at the 
West Chester State Teachers Col- 
lege gymnasium tonight. 

Advance reports indicate that the 

show will be more stupendous, 
more colossal, more replete with 
thrills thar. anything seen under a 
"big top" here in recent years. 

More than 250 performers of the 
Health and Physical Education De- 
partment of the college are to take 
part in the two-hour show, and 
strenuous rehearsals have been go- 
ing on for the past several weeks. 
Ehinger Gymnasium, Church street 
and College avenue, has been :pe- 
cially decorated for the occasion, so 
that the atmosphere will be exactly 
like that enjoyed at any outdoor 
circus in the good old summer time, 
with peanuts, popcorn, pink lemon- 
ade and toy balloons. 

Many persons in the community 
who remember the college Health 
Education Department circuses of 
former years are familiar with the 
type of entertainment to be of- 
fered. The event, always an annual 
one. was discontinued after 1936. 
In the revival this season, most of 
the features that contributed to 
the success of past performances 
will be included. The program is 
in charge of Harry R. Allen, head 
of the Health Education Depart- 
ment, who has been assisted by 
Miss Muriel Leach, Earle C. Waters. 
Charles Graham. Lloyd Lux and 
others of the department. 

Tonight's premiere performance 
starts at 8 o'clock. Approximately 
100 seats are available for the gen- 
eral public. Tomorrow there will 
be a matinee as well as an eve- 
ning performance. 




EHINGER 6 N /MNf\S>0^ 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 217 



February 28, 1941 



Department Of Health 

Education To Present 

'Circus Of Tomorrow' 

Jay Smith Acts As Ringmaster; 
Novelty Skating, Dancing, And 
Tumbling Acts To Be Performed 



The "Circus of Tomorrow" will 
be brought to West Chester un- 
der the sponsorship of the 
Health and Physical Education 
Department on Friday evening, 
March 14, and on Saturday af- 
ternoon and evening, March 15. 
Practices have been underway 
for several weeks. 

Acting as ring master of the 
entire program will be Jay 
Smith, junior Health Education 
student. The program will open 
with the formation of pyramids 
by freshmen men and women 
with the leadership of Ruth 
Wentz, Alberta Mann, Harold 
Matesky, and Richard Young. 
Following will be a demonstra- 
tion on the apparatus by Health 
Education men students directed 
by Douglas Carr and Thomas 
Triol. 

Statue Act 

Ethel Adams, Jane Pyle, and 
Mary Dotter will lead a novel 
jumping rope act performed by 
members of the freshman and 
sophomore Health Education 
women. Under the direction of 
Kenneth Matz and Harold Mc- 
Clister, the sophomore men will 
make status formations. 

Dances of all varieties will be 
presented by selected men and 
women students from all classes. 
Leading the dance activities are 
Toby D'Orazio, Elvira Barkasy, 
Rose Greco, Arthur Farley, and 
William Van Buskirk. The arts 
of tumbling will be displayed by 
selected members of the depart- 
ment, directed by Madeline 
Stitely, Helen Nickish, Marjorie 
Barkman, Richard Webster, and 
William Maurer. 

Group Skating 

Skating will be introduced by 
Frances Fackler, Pauline Gau- 
mer, Gwen Clymer, Romaine At- 
tick, Charles Gallagher, Joseph 



Salvo, and Robert Metzgar, fol- 
lowed by group skating by se- 
lected men and women students. 
Closing the program will be no- 
vel presentations by Nan Hewitt, 
Gertrude Snowden, Stephen Par- 
tel, Ernest Mowbray, Jesse Ben- 
yish, Joseph Conturso, Boyd 
Stauffer, and George Clark. 

Any student who has not al- 
ready received a ticket may get 
one today by presenting identi- 
fication cards. Alumni tickets for 
the Saturday night performance 
only can be obtained any time 
before Saturday, March 8. Stu- 
dents may purchase any remain- 
ing tickets for any performance 
on Monday and Tuesday, March 
10 and 11. 

Members of the Health Educa- 
tion department who have co- 
operated in producing the circus 
program are Mr. Harry Allen, 
Miss Elizabeth Zimmerli, Mr. 
Earl Waters, Miss Myra Wade, 
Miss Muriel Leach, Miss Anna 
Schaub, Miss Eleanore Allsworth, 
and Mr. Charles Graham. 



Many Grads 
Attend Circus 
Performances 

Many alumni returned to West 
Chester last Saturday evening to 
see the Health Education De- 
partment's "Circus of Tomor- 
row." 

Many of the alumni present 
took the Health Education 
course while attending the col- 
lege. 

Members of the Class of 1929 
present were Elsie Strickland 
Haupt, Caroline Nutt, Sarah 
Place, Anita Gualco, and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Burt, and Bernice 
Sundell. 

1931: Elizabeth Eby, Lovenia 
Miller, and Andrew Ottaviano. 

1932: Mercy Smith Howman, 
Wilford Styer, and Russell Stu- 
rizebecker. 



Students And 
Faculty Make 
Circus Plans 

The "Circus" will be brought 
to West Chester under the spon- 
sorship of the Health and Phy- 
sical Education Department on 
Friday and Saturday, March 14 
and 15, in the Ehinger Gymna- 
sium. 

All students of the Physical 
and Health Education depart- 
ment will take part in the pro- 
gram. Work on the apparatus 
will be one of the main features 
of the performance. Tumbling, 
dancing, skating and rope skip- 
ping will be a part of the activi- 
ty. 

Criterions to Play 

Jay- Smith, member of . the 
Junior Class, will act as ring- 
master for the entire show. The 
College Criterions will play nov- 
el arrangements for the various 
acts. 

Mr. Allan is the general chair- 
man for the event. He will be 
assisted by committees consist- 
ing of members of the Health 
and Physcal Education Depart- 
ment and members of the Sen- 
ior Class. The performance is 
financed to the extent of. $500 by 
the Student Activities Associa- 
tion, and all profits received 
from the sale of tickets will be 
returned to the Student Activi- 
ties Association treasury. 

1933: Ruth Arnold Estlack, H. 
W. Estlack, Paul E. Hawk, and 
Ellamae Jackson. 

1934: F. W. Fenton, Norman 
Ferguson, Derr Swisher, and Ed- 
ward linger. 

1935:-Lawson Earl, Anne Ke- 
restes, Alfred Knabb, and Doro- 
thy Yanisch. 

1936: Mary Strohn Burton, 
Dina D'Orazio De Mann, Serita 
Goldberger, Bernard Goldberger, 
and John S. Hart. 

1937: Irene Robinson Carney, 
Audrey Longenecker Henry, 
Anne Jackson, and Marie Park. 

1938: Paul Bruno, Joseph Car- 
ney, Alice Foust, Eleanor Leath- 
ers, Robert Lomax, Louise Pello. 
and Michael Wyatt. 

1939: Joseph Cave, Mabel Gei- 
ger, Louise Lupkin, Harold Mc- 
Sparran, John D. Metzgar, Judy 
Moatz, Fred Romig, John Wind- 
ish, and Bill Stratton. 

1940: Marian Hanby. Clarence 
Hart, John Hartz, Kitty Jamison, 
Jean Matthews, Jeanette Metz, 
Peg Thomas Cakes, Louise Shoe- 
maker, Bob Brown, Paul Eberle, 
Anthony Stanis, Park Middles- 
worth, George Robinson, Frank 
Jakob, Luther Shaeffer. 



218 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Friday, March 14, 1941 



Health Education Department 
Will Present Circus Tonight 



Pyramids Spark 
First Big Top 
Campus Show 

The "Circus of Tomorrow" will 
be brought to the campus by the 
Department of Physical and 
Health Education in three per- 
formances, tonight, March 14, 
and tomorrow afternoon and 
evening, March 15. 

The program will open with 
the formation of pyramids by 
freshmen men and women. Acts 
on the apparatus will be per- 
formed by men students. The 
freshmen and sophomore women 
will follow with -the presentation 
of a unique game of "Jump Rope 
and Balls." 

Actual statues will be formed 
by the sophomore men. Dances 
of all varieties will be rendered 
by selected members of all 



classes. Accurate balance and 
control will be exhibited as se- 
lected men and women perform 
acts in tumbling. 

Skill in skating will oe exem- 
plified by men and women stu- 
dents selected from the class at 
large. As a finale to the program, 
a group of students will present 
a series of special numbers. Jay 
Smith, junior Health Education 



At cacli performance of the 
Circus the doors of the Ehing- 
cr Gymnasium will be opened 
one hour before the show- 
starts, as follows: 
Perfor- Doors Show 

mances opened starts 

Evening 7:00 8:00 

Matinee 1:15 2:15 

Admission will be by ticket 
only. 

Performers must bring their 
passes to the South Front Door 
,of the Ehinger Gymnasium to 
secure admission; spectators 
will be admitted by ticket at 
the North Front Door. 



student, will act as ring master 
during the entire performance. 

There were four general com- 
mittees responsible for the or- 
ganization of the program. 
Heading the publicity commit-' 
tee were Mr: Harry Allen and 
Miss Elizabeth Zimmerli. They 
were assisted by Elvira Barkasy 
and John Day. The committee 
on tickets was also managed by 
Miss Zimmerli and Mr. Allen 
with the assistance of Mary Dot- 
ter, Ethel Adams, and Jane 
Pyle. 

Edna Witman, Florence Young, 
Harland Keating, and Paul Price 
served with Mr. Lloyd Lux on 
the decorations and lighting 
committee. 

Miss Anna Schaub, assisted by 
staff members and also by Mar- 
garet Eveler,' Betty Krida, Fran- 
ces Fackler, Marion Patrick, Ro- 
bert Murphy, Clem Klank, and 
William Ward, managed the cos- 
tumes and properties. 



Two Thousand Witness Three Performances 
Of Health Education Department's 'Circus 
Of Tomorrow'; Ehinger Gym Becomes Big Top 



Over two thousand people wit- 
nessed the "Circus of Tomorrow" 
as it was presented by the 
Health and Physical Education 
Department on Friday and Sat- 
urday, March 14 and 15. There 
were 1,049 paid admissions and 
1,234 students witnessed the va- 
rious performances. It is esti- 
mated that over five hundred 
people had to be turned away 
either by telephone or at the box 
office. 

The members of the Health 
and Physical Education staff and 
all of the students in the de- 
partment cooperated in the pro- 
duction of the circus. The Col- 
lege Criterions under the direc- 
tion of Emil Rusinko played no 
small part in the production of 
West Chester's first circus in six 
years. 



There were four committees 
responsible for the organization 
of the program; however, all of 
the members of the Health and 
Physical Education staff and ev- 
ery student of the department 
worked together for many weeks 
in preparation for one of the 
biggest events of the year. 

The Valkyrie Club and the 
Olympic Club gave up their 
yearly demonstrations in order 
to assist with the circus. The 
Valkyrie Club worked out many 
of the dances. 

The statues produced by the 
sophomore men and the narra- 
tion regarding the progress of 
Physical Education was one of 
the highlights of the show. The 
many and varied dances showed 
much talent among the students 
of the department. The clown 
numbers were also received with 
much laughter and applause. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 219 



15 MARCH 1941 



Capacity Crowd Enjoys Big 
Show At Teachers College 



Thrills and spills of the sawdust 
ring were enacted under the "big 
top" of Ehinger gymnasium, here, 
last night, as West Chester State 
Teachers College Health Education 
students put on a modernized re- 
vival of the annual "Health Ed Cir- 
cus." 

To the crack of Ringmaster Jay 
Smith's whip, more than 250 
young men and women emulated 
the troupers of genuine show busi- 
ness in the performance of acts of 
skill, strength and daring, while a 

capacity crowd of spectators 
munched peanuts, sipped soft 
drinks and noisily gpve vent to 
their approval in the lime-honored 
manner of circns fans. 

One of the best entertainments 
of Its kind ever presented by the 
college — and certainly the only en- 
tertainment of its type to be seen 
anywhere in this part of the coun- 
try—the collegiate "circus" was a 
dazzling imitation of the +eal tent 
Show. It had everything but the 
*mell and dust. Despite the, fact 
Mat last night's performance ran 
,--arly two and a half hours, on- 
<*,okers didn't get restless, but fac- 
•'Ity managers promised that to- 
^iy's matinee and evening show 
- ill be cut down to not over two 
lours. 

Ehinger gymnasium was gaily 
decorated for the opening per- 
formance. Colored lights and a 
bombastic poster advertising the 
"Greatest Show on Earth'' orna- 
mented the front of the building, 
and inside the troupers paraded be- 
neath festoons of colored pennants 
and against a magnificent mural 
background of mountain scenery. 
Colored spotlights provided glam- 
orous illumination of the three 
"rings," and real circus band music 
—the kind that every circus fan 
knows and loves — was dished out 
by the usually elite College Cii- 
terions under the direction of Emi 
Rusinko. 



The show got under way with 
good pyramid act, followed by 
menagerie exhibition which intro 
duced human "penguins," an cg° 
laying "ostrich," a mammoth "cat 
erpillar," a pink "elephant," an 
other livestock. Male gymnas 
executed some splendid feats o 
the sidehorse, the flying rings, tr 
parallel bars and the high bar, an 
a clever innovation was presents 
in the form of gymnastics perforrr 
ed on the high bar, in total darl 
ness, by men wearing costumi 
coated with luminous paint, 
similar stunt was staged in an Ir 
dian club drill, in which the lumit 
ous clubs weaved a weird pattei 
of motion during a momenta) 
blackout. 

Becomingly costumed coeds gave 
an exhibition of rope-jumping, rol- 
ler-skating, tumbling and dancing. 
Five girls demonstrated agility an^l 
rhythm in a chair dance, and an- 
other group of eight, dressed as 
bellhops, limbered up in an original 
stairway dance. A corps of girls in 
white skirts, blue blouses and red 
raps executed a military tap dance. 
Other dance acts included a twitch- 
ing rumba, with male partners; a 
clever novelty number, entitled 
"Half and Half," in which coeds 
tripped around the floor in divided 
costumes that gave the illusion of 
masculine embrace, and a finale In 
which dance steps of several na- 
tions were- demonstrated in ap- 
propriate costume. 

Two of the most appealing spots 
on the bill were the acrobatic con- 
tortions of little Miss Alice Nichol, 
supple pupil of the college Demon- 
sfflYfSrHBkviOOV-and the tap dance 
by three other little girls of the 
Demonstration School: Bernle Lou 
Ball, Pa,tty Miles and Charlotte 
Darlington. 



The Wild West touch, never 
omitted from the true circus pro- 
gram, was provided by cowboys and' 
cowgirls in a colorful dance special-( 
ty, and by lariat-twirling that the 
late Tom Mix himself would have 
applauded. 

Some really excellent tumbling 
acts, a series of sports tableaux 
modeled by silvered human "sta- 
tues," and a mixed skating act per- 
formed around a giant "snow man" 
amid falling white flakes rounded 
out the entertainment. 

The arena was overrun, of course, 
by clowns. They were everywhere, 
cavorting and frolicing, peddling 
delicious nonsense, burlesquing 
every bonafide act. Their best an- 
tics were produced in a comedy 
prize fight, a comedy baseball 
game, a sensational diving act in 
which a dummy was sent sailing to 
the floor from the building's top- 
most rafter, and a burlesque tum- 
bling performance. 

Only two mishaps marred the 
fun. Burly Arthur Farley, a foot- 
ball player, was quietly withdrawn 
from the arena and hustled to the 
college Infirmary when he develop- 
ed sudden cramps, and Marian 
Kirkpatrick was carried from the 
floor when she turned an ankle 
after being catapulted over her 
partner's head during a tumbling 
act. 

The P. T. Barnum of the show 
was Harry R. Allen, head of the 
Health and Physical Education De- 
partment of the college, and the 
faculty members of his department 
who worked out many of the fea- 
tures of the circus and trained the 
performers in their acts were Miss 
Muriel Leach, Miss Myra Wade. 
Miss Anne Shaub, Miss Elizabeth 
Zimmerli, Lloyd Lux, Charles L. 
3raham and Earle C. Waters. 



Leading Gymnasts 
In Exhibition At 



Gym 



Ehinger 

Leading gymnasts from this 
section will assemble in the 
Ehinger Gym at 7:30 this eve- 
ning to compete in the Middle 
Atlantic A. A. U. Championships. 

In addition to members of the 
local team, entries have been re- 
ceived from Temple, national 



collegiate champions, Penn 
State, Philadelphia Turners, 
Germantown "Y," and many 
outstanding high school stars. 
Events listed include junior and 
senior parallel bars, junior high 
bar, and junior tumbling. 

The contest is being spon- 
sored by West Chester's Olympic 
Club and the admission fee of 
twenty-five cents per person will 
be added to the club's sweater 
fund. 



220 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Circus of Tomorrow — 14 And 15 March 1941 




f.iv Smith. 



1 1 • . i 1 1 1 1 1 (.• all. 




I )i i. Ii ,i--,,l 



( )lll | ■ | >\ l .1 III li I llll'll. 



| | • > 1 1 . 1. i , ■. Ill Hl| • 




Tlu- Morrv Wulow" \V.i'.:. 



Men in silver. 



The tr.nlilion.il strong s 



vu 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 221 



Circus of Tomorrow — 14 And 15 March 1941 









iiiiiiiii tniimniiiiiiiii iimmi! mmi 




222 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Kay Geary, Elmer Unger 
(Donor of Ladder For 1941 Show) 




Fred Fisher-Chief Carpenter 
Ayres Unger-Photographer 
(Reproduction of 1941 Ladder in 1992) 




Si 

ll M 


■atUM 

■M 



Milan Trnka and 
Dr. Yoko Hashimoto-Sinclair 



1992 Clowns — Milan Trnka, Ayres 

Unger, John Rodgers' 37, John Furlow' 55, 

Russ Sturzebecker' 37, Millard Robinson' 36 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 223 



Olympic Club Presents 
Annual Show And Dance 
In Gym Saturday Night 



Various Skills 
Are Exhibited 

This Saturday,. March 7th, 
marks the Annual Olympic Club 
Show and Dance. 

The "first part of the evening 
will be a demonstration in the 
Ehinger Gym. Marching tactics, 
drills with Indian clubs and In- 
dian wands, pyramids, appara- 
tus, and individual statue work 
"will all be included in the eve- 
ning's show. 

Much Apparatus Work Included 

The apparatus work will in- 
clude work on the spring board, 
long horse, parallel bars, high 
bars, mats, and rings. 

Highlighting the evening will 
be Don Kirk who, in an outfit 
of phosphorescent shoes, shirt, 
and trouser stripes, will perform 
on the high bar in a darkened 

gym. 

All in all, there will be ten to 
twelve events. "Members of the 
club will be supplemented by 
several freshmen in the pyra- 
mids and marching. 



6 MARCH 1942 



In order to qualify for mem- 
bership, students of any curric- 
ulum must place in two different 
events in the gym meet held in 
April. A majority vote of all 
members permits a student to 
join the ranks. The officers are: 
Gene Drozd, president; Bill 
Hockman, vice-president; and 
Bill Reese, secretary-treasurer. 

The admission for demonstra- 
tion at 7:30 is 25c. The dance 
will be held in Recreation Hall 
at 9:00 o'clock. Ed Twardowski 
heads the Dance Committee 
with Bill Robinson, Bill Reese, 
and Jim Snyder assisting. Other 
committee chairmen are ~ Ed 
Walls and Gene Drozd, ticket 
and publicity committees. 

As an extra attraction the 
Olympic Club will present Sid- 
ney Rudman, Penn State exhi- 
bitionist. Sid, a former West 
Chester student, is an all-around 
artist and specializes in high 
bars, parallel bars, nad rings. 
He has been victorious in every 
meet he has appeared in for 
State against such formidable 
Tivals as Navy. Rudman has per- 
formed for the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Gym Association. 



224 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



6 MARCH 1942 



Varsity Club 
In Rehearsal 
For Big Event 

By Philip Eberly 

With a new bonnet to adoiv. 
his countenance, and new tap 
shoes to grace his agile feet, C 
G. A. Roach will make his third 
Derformance in the annual 
Wayne Hall Follies. The versatile 
little "Dean" of the male's resid- 
ing house will portray Mother 
Chips in his third starring ve- 
hicle. 

Ardent In Rehearsal 

Ardent in his rehearsal, Roach, 
as he is known to his proteges, 
claims mastery of his 23,352- 
word script. Few of the Follies' 
participants can boast of such 
progress so eferly. In addition he 
needs only a two-hour a week 
lesson in tap dancing. Director 
Gardiner attributes this to his 
versatile acting-dancing quali- 
ties. 

Has Two Years Behind Him 

A seasoned artist of the legi- 
timate theatre, Roach has two 
years of performance behind 
him. Fans will remember him as 
Mr. Findtown two years ago and 
General Foods in last year's Fol- 
lies. It is claimed that C. G. 
reaches the climax of his career 
this year when he plays up to 
the audience with prototype of 
Barrymore's profile. 

Three new songs will emerge 
hits when the history of this 
year's Wayne Hall Follies is 
written. The annual production 
will take place Saturday night, 
March twenty-first, in the Phil- 
ips Memorial Auditorium. 

JLoughran-Gardincr Write Songs 

With director John Gardiner 
writing the lyrics, and Don 
Loughran composing the music, 
the songs should prove a success. 
"She's Mine at Intermission" 
concerns a young fellow who is 
unable to dance; but he is will- 
ing to sit them out until inter- 
mission. The catchy fox-trot will 
be sung by the leading male, 
John Murphy. 

A patriotic spirit permeates 
the number, "It's Only the Be- 
ginning But Wait Till the End." 
William (I'm a great leader) 
Corcoran, who portrays #6hn 
Whitacker, will chant this air. 




RAISE THEM HIGH is 1I t , he " ,0,t " of thcsc «•";•"»» 

will -tep out tomorrow night in 
the Wayne Hall Follies of 1942. Photo by Toombs 

Varsity Club To Present 
Wayne Hall Follies' 42; 
John Gardiner, Director 



Chorus Girls Wili 
Initiate Dances 

By Philip Eberly 
The world premiere of the 
1942 edition of Wayne Hall 
Follies will be presented tomor- 
row night. The curtain-raising 
ceremony will take place in the 
Philips Memorial Auditorial 
and is scheduled for 8:15. 

John Gardiner, who holds an 
authorship to the great produc- 
tion, states that his cast of 
forty-two are putting the finish- 
ing touches to this year's show. 
Director Gardiner and his cast 
have completed weeks of ardu- 
ous rehearsals in order that the 
Follies might achieve as great 
success as the former Wayne 
Hall dramatic ventures. 

Chorus Is Highlight 

Highlighting the show will be 
the lovely chorus, consisting of 
sixteen of Wayne Hall's most 
versatile dancers. The chorus 
will perform fresh, new,- vivid 
routines. These will be interpret- 
ed to the three numbers, "Boogie 
Woogie Conga," "Kiss The Boys 
Goodbye," and "Buckle Down, 
West Chester." All sixteen in 
the group will be attired in 
beautiful evening gowns de- 
signed especially for the show. 



Another high spot of the fol- 
lies will be the appearance .:f 
the octette. They will sing three 
numbers. 

Sli'jw Contains Adventurous Story 

Director Gardiner's show is 
woven around a highly interest- 
ing narrative. The story con- 
cerns the adventures of a Paris 
rreat'on, before World War II. 
This beautiful gown is designed 
by "Mother Chips" Roach. The 
gown becomes a source of com- 
petition between "Agnei Torch'' 
Messick and "Lana Burner" 
Hoffman. Each character feels 
!hat if she acquries the coveted 
gown, she will become queen of 
the great ball. All events in the 
show lead one to believe that 
"Torchy" will be victorious. But 
"Herman Bottleneck" Cheese- 
man changes plans for the viva- 
cious, red-headed Torchy. Final- 
ly, after many entanglements 
and squabbles, "Johnny Apple" 

Murphy secures the gown for 
the queen of the ball, "Lana 
Burner." 

An addition will be made to 
the list of campus publications 
with the appearance of the 1942 
Wayne Hall Follies. It will be a 
twenty-page program which 
contains pictures of the show 
and scenes around and about 
the campus. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 225 



John Gardiner 
Again Directs 
Follies Show 

Each year's Wayne Hall Fol- 
lies is supposed to be the best. 
But this time, according to di- 
rector John Gardiner, the an- 
nual theatrical production will 
hit a new high. March 21 has 
been set as the date for the 
world premiere of Wayne Hall's 
gift to the dramatic world. 

Story Built Around College Life 

The story is built around life 
on a typical college campus, 
with all the joys, intrigues, and 
little worries that go for making 
college a likely setting. "Modern 
Design" has been blamed for 
many things. This time the fa- 
mous slogan becomes a dress 
over which conflict occurs. It is 
around this that the story takes 
shape. One of the high spots is 
reached when Lana Burner, por- 
trayed by Bruce Hoffman, gets 
; n a fight with Agnes Torch, 
olayed by Fred "Mole" Messick. 

Cast Included Fifty-Two 

Heading the stellar cast of 
fifty-two are Herman Bottle- 
neck, who is everything his 
name suggests; Mother Chips- 
tobe, interpreted by Charles (I 
know my script already) Roach; 
Roosevelt, Churchill, and John 
Whitaker are the guest artists 
who will be on hand. A "Boogie 
Conga" highlights the three new 
dance routines created by the 
director. On the musical side, 
there will be three new top 
flight songs; they were written 
by the team of Gardiner and 
Laughran. As a special feature 
this year's Wayne Hall Follies 
will include piano capers by Da- 
v i d (Rochester) Warrington. 
The artist claims to be able to 
handle anything from Bach to 
Basie. 

Bill Waller will have charge of 
the stage technicalities. He will 
be working with a completely 
new set of scenery. 



Friday, March 27. 1942 

Wayne Hall's 

at 

Annual Follies 
Draws Crowd 

Ey Philip E3erly 
With the first day of spring to 
spur them on, the Thespians of 
Wayne Hall added a record 
breaking Follies to the books. A 
near capacity crowd witnessed 
the third annual West Chester 
"mask and wig show" last Sat- 
urday. 

From the opening dance of 
"Carmen Miranda" McMullen to 
the last curtain, it was an en- 
poyable evening to all who at- 
tended. Clever dances and songs, 
interspersed with an interesting 
story, comprised the Wayne Hall 
Follies, 1942. 

Corcoran Interprets Whitaker 

William Corcoran, in the role 
of John Whitaker, gave a re- 
markable performance. His ora- 
tory highlighted Act II and was 
one of the high spots of the 
whole show. Likewise Robert 
Moffet, impersonating Winston 
Churchill, deserves special men- 
tion. The accent, the V for vic- 
tory, and the cigar were all 
blended by Moffet into a great 
interpretation of the British 
prime minister. 

For clever slapstick, Joe Col- 
lins and Paul Phillips were tops. 
Their dance, modeled after Win- 
slow and Fitzsimons, brought 
many laughs from an apprecia- 
tive audience. 



Mother Chips Performs Well 

As was expected, Charles G. 
C. Roach in his role of "Mother 
Chips" gave a notable perform- 
ance. This was the third year of 
Follies work for the little "dean 
of Wayne Hall." and is consid- 
ired by many his best. Cast in 
he feminine lead, "Mole" Mes- 
sick deserves special mention for 
'lis superior acting. Also John 
Murohy, Paul Horn, Murray Ed- 
wards, and Bruce Hofman did 
Ine work in the parts they held. 
Director John Gardiner thus 
?ompletes the third and last 
vear of his dramatic venture 
with 1942 Wayne Hall Follies. A 
clever story, fine cast, and ap- 
propriate music all added up to 
spell success in this, the last of 
Gardiner's Follies. 

The Board of Production 

The board of production, con- 
sisting of Bill Gable, George 
G o 1 1 s h a 1 1 , Louis Verrachio, 
George Kerber, Ed Twardowski, 
and Bill Waller, all contributed 
to make the Follies a huge suc- 
cess. Many headaches and trou- 
bles must be endured by a board 
of production, but the board 
considers their troubles worth- 
while after Saturday night. 

Following the show, there was 
a dance in Recreation Hall. The 
Critericns, under the leadership 
of Kenny Farrar, played to a 
throng of dancing "first- 
nighters." 



226 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 227 



CAST 

Mother Chips Charles Roach 

Johnny Apple John Murphy 

Agnes Torch Fred Messick 

Desmond Deferred William Suydam 

Lana Burner Bruce Hoffman 

Nat Defense Murray Edwards 

Herman Bottleneck R- Cheeseman 

Professor William Houghton 

Tess Truelove Paul Horn 

President Wooster Harry Todd 

Parent Harold McCorkle 

John Hittiker William Corcoran 

American Beauties John Kizawick 

Jake Gaffney 
Joseph Bell 

Taxi Driver William Robinson 

Act I 

Scene I Place — Woogressive Campus 
Time — Three in the afternoon. 

Scene II Place— Lecture Hall. 
Time — Following day. 

Act II 

Scene I Place— Ye Olde Inn. 

Time — Five O'clock that evening. 

Scene II Place — Recreation Hall. 
Time — Evening. 



Loughran-Gardiner Announce Musical Score 

"Kiss the Boys Goodby" Written by Loesser and Schertzinger 

Song by R. McMullin 

Dance by Chorus 

"She's Mine at Intermission" Written by Loughran and Gardiner 

Song by R. Cheeseman 

"I Don't Wanta Walk Without You" Written by Loesser and Styne 

Song by F. Messick, B., Hoffman, W. Suydam, J. Murphy 

Specialty Dance by P. Phillips and J. Collins 

"It's Only the Beginning but Wait Till the End" Loughran and Gardiner 

W. Corcoran 
H. Todd 

Specialty Churchhill by R. Moffett 

"Crocodile Tears" Written by Loughran and Gardiner 

Song by David Warrington 

Dance by Chorus 

V. Presto and V. DeMagistris 

"She's Mine at Intermission" 

Song by J. Murphy 

Specialty Dance 

Charles Cleveland Alexander Roach 

"Buckle Down West Chester" Written by Martin and Blane 

Song by J. Gardiner 

Octet 
March by Chorus 

Music by the College Criterions. 



228 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



15 JANUARY 1943 



CHORUS CUTIES POSE 




Bob Parrott, Herb Truxton, Eddie Norris and 
Alan Eberle step out of the chorus line long enough 
to grcnt the QUAD photographer a pose. 



Belle Of Wayne Hall Appears 
In 'For The Love Of Mike' 



Ginny Ricker is the little lady 
who broke an all-time precedent 
and appeared as the only "wom- 
an" in the traditional all-male 
cast of the Wayne Hall Follies. 

Ginny, three-year-old daugh- 
ter of Dean and Mrs. Ralph 
Ricker, was introduced to the 
audience of "For the Love of 
Mike", as the sweetheart of 
Wayne Hall. Appearing on the 
stage for a brief moment with 
Dick Wlsneski as her gallant es- 
cort, the little belle captivated 
the house. 

Prior to the night of the show, 
publicity for the Follies an- 
nounced that Phil Eberly's big 
production would star one girl; 




Ginny Ricker 
. . . Wayne Hall's Favorite 

however, programs carried ques- 
tion marks in the space left for 
the lady's name. 



Wayne Hall 
Follies Held 
In March 

Provided Uncle Sam is willing, 
the annual Wayne Hall Follies 
will be given sometime in March. 
The show will contain many of 
the old features that have made 
the Varsity Club's extravaganza 
so popular. In addition, there 
will be new ideas and acts. 

As usual, there will be the 
famous Wayne Hall dancing 
chorus. This chorus has come to 
be a tradition with the first 
night audiences at the Follies. 
The show this year is being writ- 
ten by Bill Houghton and Phil 
Eberly. According to the writ- 
ers, the show is practically writ- 
ten and rehearsals will soon be- 
gin. 

Don Loughran, brilliant com- 
poser of the Criterions, is writing 
original music for the Varsity 
Club production. Bill and Phil 
will supply the lyrics. The loss 
of many Wayne Hall thespians, 
as well as director John Gar- 
diner, will be felt as definite 
blows. Gardiner wrote and dir- 
ected the Follies of '41 and '42. 
More stories, and. previews wilL 
appear from time to time as to 
the development and news of 
1943's Wayne Hall Follies. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 229 



Wayne Hall Follies Date Set For February 27; 
Chorine Charlie Roach Stars Once More 



"This Is WANE of the Green 
Nutwork." Such is the station 
identification of a new radio 
station to go on the air for one 
night — February 27. All this, 
of course, refers to the 1943 edi- 
tion of the Wayne Hall Follies. 

The Varsity Club Show en- 
titled "For the Love of Mike" has 
been moved up from the March 
calendar date so that the show 
may definitely be given. The 
show will be centered around the 
studios of station WANE via 
the Green Nutwork. Owner of 
th's station is veteran Thes- 
pian, the terrible, dreaded Q. T. 
Stern. Roach will be supported 
by a stellar cast of veterans. 
These include. John Murphy. 
Paul Horn. Robert Moffett, Joe 
Pollock, Walter Klinikowski, and 
Mike Toconita. 

Also appearing in the Varsity 
Club extravaganza will be those 
Wayne Hall beauties who will 
dance. The chorines are rehear- 
sing nightly on steps devised by 
Max Baker. Charles (Q. T. 
Stern) Roach will also dance 
some of his original creations. 
Included in the various dance 
routines will be a jitterbug 
chorus (see cut above) . 

'Tor the Love of Mike" was 
written by Phil Eberly and Wil- 
liam Houghton. Houghton is, now 
in the army. The show Includes 



Try outs Are Held 
Wednesday Night 
For Varsity Show 

Tryouts were held on Wed- 
nesday night for the Wayne Hall 
Follies. The Varsity Show this 
year will take place sometime in 
March. 

While the status of the re- 
serves on campus is still uncer- 
tain, the actual date of the per- 
formance is uncertain. But ev- 
ery effort is being made to pre- 
sent the Follies at the earliest 
time possible. As usual, the show 
will highlight the leading Wayne 
Hall thespian, Charles C. G. 
Roach. Others in his support- 
ing cast will be such notables as 
Bob Moffett, Joe Pollock, and 
Murray Edwards. 

This year's show, to be pre- 
sented by the Varsity Club, is en- 
titled "For the Love of Mike." 
It will be centered around radio 
station WANE. Rehearsals have 
already begun, and, Uncle Sam 
willing, the Wayne Hall Follies 
will be as big a hit as ever. 




\ scene from Ihe "1943 Wayne ll.ill Follies" showing "Charlie" Roach, 
si. u oi tin show, in the foreground. 



"You re A Grand Chorus" 



three acts and rehearsals indi- 
cate the Follies will be as big 
as ever. Eberly is directing the 
show which includes highspots 
of drama, singing, dancing, and 
acting. 

5 FEBRUARY 1943 



Programs and tickets are 

being printed and the tickets 
will soon be ready for distri- 
bution. QUAD will carry fur- 
ther details of the Follies to be 
presented February 27. 



Charlie Roach 
To Star Again 
In Follies 

True talent can never lie fal- 
low for long. TheTefo'e, it is 
"with" great joy and apprehension 
that the Inner Dorm Council of 
Inner Councils announces to the 
student body its brand new ver- 
sion of the "Wayne Hall Follies 
cf 1943." 

"For the Love of Mike" is the 
label of the Varsity Show. Writ- 
ten by Phil Eberly and Bill 
Houghton — who is now in the 
Army — this year's production, 
originally scheduled for March, 
will be given in approximately 
three weeks, conditions permit- 
ting. 

Much secrecy shrouds the show 
this year, but news smuggled out 
to us from the inner confines of 
the "fortress" indicates that the 
boys have a hit on their hands. 

Intensive rehearsals have al- 
ready started. Try-outs were 



completed last week; those tak- 
ing major parts include such 
stellar men as Murphy, Mof- 
fett, Pollock, and Edwards. Klin- 
kowski, DeChant, Horn, and 
Presto will also show their wares. 

To make us feel as if we had 
made an entrance into a for- 
bidden world, we were flatly 
turned down at the door by the 
two sentinels who informed us 
that it was their turn to rehearse 
their lines of "Red Riding Hood," 
so would we please go away? 
However, we did get an inkling 
of what it's going to be like, by 
gluing our forehead to a window. 

The sight of men strolling in- 
to a room attired in pajamas and 
bath robes is quite a sight. After 
they were seated, Phil Eberly in- 
troduced Charlie Roach, and 
asked him to read his lines. 
Roach, a veteran of many Fol- 
lies, got up and put the audi- 
ence into hysterical gales of 
laughter. We remember Char- 
lie as the eccentric general, Gen- 
eral Foods, and last year as the 
diminutive Mrs. Chips. 



230 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



'For The Love Of Mike' Last Wayne Hall 
Follies; Keeps Large Audience Laughing 



Houghton, Eberly 
Write Script; 
Horn Directs 

"For the Love of Mike," the 
last Wayne Hall Follies for the 
duration, had the audience in 
stitches from beginning to end. 
Written by Bill Houghton and 
Phil Eberly, and directed by Paul 
Horn, this three-act comedy was 
saturated with satire, puns, and 
anything and everything else in 
the line of humor. Front seats 
were filled long before the show 
started. Also before the Follies 
started, there was an announce- 
ment concerning "Clutch's" 
horn, which was missing from 
the cloak room. Afterwards, the 
instrument was found in the 
cloak room, hidden behind a 
chair! 

Everyone was in a gay mood 
— before, during, and after the 
show. Although such important 
characters as Bill Gable and 
Walt Klinikowski were notice- 
ably missing, the show, which 




Swinging Out . . . for the last time for the duration are 
the boys in the 1943 Wayne Hall Follies, "For the 
Love of Mike." 



owner, danced an original ere- several times during the play and 
ation. Wayne Hall Follies fired his gun, aiming at a gong 
wouldn't be complete without off-stage. Surprise of the eve- 
had been moved up a month on charliej who is the "Professor ning came when Ginny Ricker, 
account of E.R.C. men being of Mopo]og y.» M ike Toconita, Wayne Hall's little Queen, made 
called, was a big success. High- w. C.'s character player, gave her appearance as the "One- 
lighted by the shapely Wayne Science majors a new slant on and-Only-Girl-in Follies." 
Hall dancing chorus and a jit- tte and ohms Joe Pollock as rertairi iv be riven 

terbug number by Vince Presto Croake Bart the radlo an _ Credit must certainly be gven 
and Joe Mustin (who were re- nouncer read some very humor- t0 members of the backstage 
quested by a very appreciative QUS commerc i als . Joe a i so tU rn- crew and to the Criterions, for 
audience to do an encore) there ed in a fine perlormance as without their help, the Follies 
was a variety of numbers, from a President Roosevelt, and Moffett couldn't have been the success 
Red Riding Hood radio program ^ ukewise as Winston Church- it was. Norman Goldberg and 
to an excellent portrayal of the m Daniel Sukowski were the stage 

Casablanca conference by Joe John Kamm> as We xell, the technicians, and members of 
Pollock and ^Bob Moffett. Tne inspired Mus j c Supe> turned on Little Theatre helped with make- 
only "serious scene in For the an express j on that was enough up. Don Loughran composed 
Love of Mike took place wnen to stop a clock Anotri er Music original music, which was play- 
John Murphy, as Terry Ryan, Supe Manual schwager, opened ed by the Criterions under the 
kissed his roommate, Paul Horn, the flrst act ^^ a pass i 0na t e direction of Herman Helwig. Al- 
who i portrayed the very feminine clarinet so i . In direct contrast so in line for recognition are all 
Sandra Stern. to the quiet mood of the first those girls who loaned red sweat- 

Charlie Roach, stellar perform- number, Norman Sacs, the Gun ers and white skirts to the mem- 
er, as Q. T. Stern, radio station Man, walked across the stage bers of the dancing chorus. 



Valkvrie Show 
Proves Ability 
Of Health Eds 

West Chester's Health Educa- 
tion girls shone forth last Friday 
evening when they presented 
"The Diamond Ring," a three- 
act comedy, written and directed 
by Evelyn Mast, Valkyrie Club 
member. The show, which hart 



Its premiere in the Philips Me- 
morial Auditorium, promises to 
become the hit of the season. 

Leading the cast of nearly a 
score of stars was Miss "Pud" 
White, who starred in the role 
of "Jane Wilmer." organizer 
and presldei.t cf the school's 
secret organization. Classmates 
and cohorts in the club included 
"Trixie" (Bobby Beidlert . "Bob- 
by" (Becky Mousleyi. 'Porky," 
alias Adelaide (Evelyn Mast), 
Hannah, the would-be Sherlock 
Holmes (Sunny Heller), Alma 
(Eleanor Zimmerman), Jackie 
(Nancy Baldwin). Susan (Pat 



Myers). Toby (Winnie Piersol), 
Nan (Jane Harris) . Joan (Nancy 
Doveyi. Teddy i Eleanor Gal- 
lery), Mary (Flo Skinnen. and 
Bunny (Audrey Dyen. Mary 

Ann Clabby, Anne Kuebler, and 
Mary Barton, who formed a 
quartette. 

The Criterions alternated 
with Marcella Wise, pianist, in 
playing for the special num- 
bers. Following the perform- 
ance, a dance was held in Rec- 
reation Hall, where the fresh- 
men Health Education students 
acted as hostesses. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 231 



Wavne Hall Men Give 'For Love Of Mike' 
Tonight After Advancing Original Date 



Tonight, at 8:15, the curtain 
will rise on the 1943 edition of 



Radio Programs Satirized 

"For the Love of Mike" is set Aided by the cast, Terry tries 
the Wayne Hall Follies. "For the around the radio station WANE, his best to put his own version 
Love of Mike" is the name of Owned by Q. T 
this year's Varsity Club Show 



Stern who will ci the show on. Adding moral 

be portrayed by his' highness su PP° rt t0 a ne , w deal fo ^ W £NE 

are: Joe Pollock as Croake Bar- 



moved up from its March date Charles G. Roach, WANE seems ter Murray Edwards as Red Dia- 
in order to accommodate the to have an obsession for getting mond, Robert Moffett as Milton 
Army Reserve call. in to trouble. Q. T. is dead set Loss, Paul Horn as Sandra Stern, 

A cast of aDoroximatelv twen- against all forms of popular en- X! nCe Prest ° ' as Petunia Ogle- 
a cast 01 approximately twen- . K * . thcrpe. Other Wayne Hallites 

ty Wayne Hall Thespians, to- tertammen., including swing. 

gether with a dancing chorus of fnd due to the fact that popu- to be«en in the^emiere tf the 

twelve, will appear for audience lar shows relv on Popular music, 

approval in the Philips Memor- [ he sta tion is headed for cer- 
tain docm. But, along comes 
a U.S.O. contract. Naturally, Q. 
T. Stern wishes to rush his clas- 
sical cultural program through 



ial Auditorium. Due to the hur- 
ried change of date, the show is 
not expected to assume the pro- 



Dortions of previous Follies; but for the Army. However, hero 

after two weeks of intensive re- ? u err , y ^ aja " (John Murphy) 
, .. . ... thinks the Army would go for 

hearsals the show will go on. diffe rent entertainment. It is 

here the trouble starts. 



Varsity Club Show will include 
Michael Toconita who portrays 
Er. Figaro; Ned DeChant is the 
telegraph boy; John Hopkins. 
John Joyce and Tony Litwak will 
appear in a "Red Riding Hood' 
burlesque; Joe DiFranks and 
Walt Klinikowski are proud so- 
ciety women who will be on 
hand. 





Glen Killinger (left) And Earle Waters (right) Report To United States Naval Reserve WWII 



(There Were No Shows During 1944 and 1945 Due To WWII) 



232 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Armistice Day 

Memorial Service 
1944 











PHILIPS MEMORIAL CHAPEL 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT 

WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 
NOVEMBER TENTH 

10:00 A.M. 



<3Jn ffltmotxum 
* 

George N. Blackburn, Class of 1939 
Clevio Rogo, Class of 1937 
Harlan Philips, Class of 1928 
Joseph B. Lynch, Class of 1944 
John A. Grycky, Class of 1940 
Harland B. Keating, Class of 1941 
Calvin A. Smedley, Class of 1940 
Francis Paules, Class of 1939 
Paul R. Schaeffer, Class of 1946 
Howard W. Jordan, Class of 1941 
Bruce B. Hoffman, Class of 1942 
Louis Waldo Bellow, Class of 1945 
Ernest J. Gere, Class of 1942 

For the last two years Armistice Day has been observed on 
the campus at West Chester by ceremonies of solemn acknow- 
ledgement of the debt owed to the young men and women from 
the college who are serving their country with the armed forces. 
The roll of honor has been increased to 
931 names, of which thirteen are marked with gold stars. 



Valkyries Entertain 
Faculty, Students 
At 'Petunia Ranch' 

On Saturday night, March 3, 
the Valkyrie Club held open 
house at "Petunia Ranch" for 
the students, faculty, alumnae 
members and high school stu- 
dents. The corral of the ranch 
was the setting for this year's 
show, which was written and 
directed by Jane Hartman and. 
Mary Lehman. 

The "guests" were greeted by 
Joan Sabp, as "Joe," the host 
and owner of Petunia Ranch. 
The personnel of the ranch in- 
cluded Helen Lauver as Joe's 



wife, "Cactus Fannie;" Martha 
Shalitta as "Wild Nell;" and 
Madeline Walters as "Grand- 
dad." Many Cowboys and In- 
dians were also present at the 
gathering. 

As in the past, the Valkyrie 
Show followed the lines of a re- 
vue and included singing, danc- 
ing, tumbling, and some special 
features. The specialties were 
given by Grace Harris and Es- 
ther Yerkes, tap dancersj Ber- 
tha Coppock and Gladys Sager, 
tumblers; and Doris; Snyder, 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 233 



PHILIPS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

SATURDAY EVENING 



ISP 



MAY 5, 1945 

8:00 O'CLOCK 



SPONSORED BY THE CLASS OF 1946 

SCRIPT BY DOROTHY RAMSEY 

PROLOGUE 

First Voice Elaine Lowy 

Wide in the sun lies the land that we love. To the east the surge of the 
storm-tossed Atlantic — to the .vest the shining and roiling Pacihc. To 
the north lie the snows and the pmes; to the south stir the palms in the 
wind from the tropical waters. Nobly her ranges of mountains rise, and 
short, swift rivers cut the plains to the sea. Within the circle oi these 
hills the throbbing heart ot the land — prairie and meadow, desert and 
sown, forest and farm, and roads that curve to the round of the world. 

Oh. Path beaten out by myriad feet of those w-ho heeded the challenge 
of far horizons! Driving, relentless, impassioned — theCary of a star to 
the soul! The years pass like a dream and a nation is born and moves 
onward, and a road is beaten across the continent. Young men and old, 
the women they cherished, the little ones born of their loving — where 
will they pause and know peace trom the piteous call ot the road? 

Beside the strong, white road there stands a tree. When the road cries 
"On!" the tree will murmur "Rest!" 

Second Voice Doris Denholm 

In summer the road is a burning bridge between yesterday and tomorrow 
— the tree is a deep, green retuge. 

Third Voice Patricia Allen 

In autumn the road is a trumpet blast, and the tree is a bannered city. 

Fourth Voice Lois Rhoads 

In winter the road is a white danger, and the tree is a strength and a 
promise. 

Fifth Voice Evelyn Fair 

In spring the road is a singing march, and the tree is a resurrection. 

' Voices in Chorus: Never the same, and ever the same — roots deep in the soil 
p£fa the land|branches arching and free, one with the earth and one with the 
skv — there is alwavs a road to crv "Onl" — there is alwavs a tree to say 
"Restr 

PART ONE 

SUMMER 

Second Voice: In summer the road is a burning bridge between yesterday 
and tomorrow, and the tree is a deep, green refuge. Softly the sun goes 
down in the West, and the world knows a rest and a respite under the 
moon. Today's waltz and yesterday's minuet, beauty and romance, 
dinging or curtsying in silken loveliness in the starlight — the tree ""»lr^ 
a darker shadow for lovers, and the summer night is filled with song. 

Moonlight Music by Debussy 

I Would That My Lore Mendelssohn 

Spanish Waltz (Estudians«i) Waidteufel 

The Shining Days of May -. John B. Wcst-Zimmcr 

Minuet Dance Bocchtrini 

Sister Months Johnstone 



Kanafaska (Czecho-SIovakian Dance) . 

Pippa's Song 

Tarantella (Italian Dance) 

The CaIl~r».Spring 



Czech Foik Tune 



West 

- Ibilitin Fo!k Tune 
IV-si 



Maypole Dance music ry Percy Grainier 

FESTIVAL COMMITTEE 
Chairman Miss Myra Wade 



Staging and script. 



Miss Dorothy Ramsay 



Orchestra Mr. Edward Zi.mmer 

Dances 



[Mr. Harry Allen. Miss Muriel Leach. 
■ Miss Avne Schal-3. Miss Myra Wade, 
lMiss Elizabeth Zimmerli 



Mr. Arthur Iones 

Songs j Miss Emma Kiess 

Miss Gertrude Schmidt 

Costumes Miss Elizabeth Tyson 

Decorative Art Miss Hazel Lamborn 

Properties Mr. Charles Graham 



Festival Committee. 



STUDENT PERSONNEL 

/Laurie Welter. President of Class of 1946 
I Anne Hackman, Lois Rhoads 

Publicity Theresa Giordano 

/-. . /Georgianna Shutter 

Costuming \ElIZABETH TOHNSON 

Decorations: Fannie Lee, Ruth Fingerhut, Marguerite Haney, Florence 
Rainville, Fay Rantz, Katherine Behrens. William Shrewsbury, 
Mildred Hartman, Catherine Murray, Vera Deck. Mary Luchte- 
meyer, Betty Hawkins, Mary Hammer, Darby Moss. 

Dance Accompanists: Virgdxia Goslee, Mirlam Hollowell. Mildred John- 
son, Patty Wiggins, Marcella Wise, Dolores Greener. Doris AnnHeim. 

DANCERS 



Mary Barton 
Betsy Chartener 
Jane Hartman 



LaVerne Ashworth 
Grace Bender 
Ellen Gallagher 
Edith Hamer 
Marguerite Haney 
Joy Horst 



MOONLIGHT 

Helen Hoover 
Anne Kuebler 
Phyllis Ladd 



smv.j 



SPANISWWALTZ 

Blanche Lavtn 
Fannie Lee 
Jean Lutonski 
Kathryn Murray 
Margaret Mansley 



Helen Lauver 
Darby Moss 
Esther Yerkf.s 



Jeanne Parrott 
Lois Roth 
Rebecca Schroeder 
Marion Watson 
Laurie Welter 



MINUET 



Nancy Adams 
Elva Bailey 
Melba Dinkel 
Jean Doherty 



Mary Jane Gougler 
Geraldine Pellettieri 
Lois Rhoads 
Lois Webster 



Vivian Acker 
Doris Blade 
Jean Bowers 
Jean Doerflein 
Jane Fisher 



Ann Clabby 
Virginia Gorgodian 



HARVEST DANCE 

Dolores Greiner 
Miriam Hollowell 
Jean Houghton 
Mary Levergood 
Makiorie Liggett 



Jean Rambo 
Patricia Ross 
Alice Stkametz 
Audrey Thomas 
Catherine W'ilhel.m 



SOUTHERN TAP DANCE 

Gloria Reedeh Doris Snyder 



Gladys Sager 



Esther Yerkes 



234 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



COWBOY DANCE 
Mary Bascelli, Ciller 
Judith Altshuler Alice Hoffman 

Mary Carter Mariokie McDaniel 

Grace Evans Mahy Jane Myers 

Doris Herzel Marion Scarborough 



Ruth Baker 
Patricia Becker 
Katherine Beiirens 
Marjorie Brenner 
Adele Costello 
Ruth Fingerhut 



HIGHLAND SCHOTTISCHE 

Jean Smith 
Gene Thompson 

GeORGIANNA ShUTTER 

Lorraine Thomas 
Anita Walton 



Theresa Giordano 
Betty Hawkins 
Rachel James 
Mildred Johnson 
Elizabeth Lindemann 



Marguerite Bartell 
Irene DeHoff 
Beatrice Dixon 
Gladys Dotts 
Florence Frist 
Dorothy Hendershott 



Slsanne Miller 

KOROBOTCHKA 

Marion Huebnek 
Barbara Jefferies 
Harriet Kaplan 
Katherine Marcerum 
Betty Jane'Oberdick 

SKATERS' WALTZ 



Edna Warwick 



Elinor Pack 
Bertha Rash 
Shirley Rubinstein 
Sara Trostle 
Wanda Wilkie 



Storm King Wttt 

Highland Schottische Scotch Folk Tune: arc. Zimmer 

Castles In the Air Arthur E - Johnstone 

Korobotchka (Russian Dance) Russian Folk Tunc 

Deck the Halls Traditional: arr. Kccnan 

Skaters' Waltz Waldtcujcl 

PART FOUR 
SPRING 






Fijth Voice: 
rection 
miracle 



In spring the road is a singing march, and the tree is a resur- 
Blossoms whiten on the bough, and the sky is a blue-and-white 
The air is sunlit to warmth and little flowering bushes dance 
>n the hills. Whether it be soft and sweet or gay and rollicking, spring 
belongs to youth and youth to spring. Therefore do young men sing 
songs, and maidens dance, and one of them is chosen and gowned and 
crowned to be Queen of the May. So hail the Queen and bring her forth, 
and match the young wind's gaiety in dancing under the tree. 



Cornelia Dill 
Florence Dorward 
Mariorie Gray 

Mary Louise Hershey 
Mildren Hymen 



Gloria Reinerth 
Jeanne Sevison 
Alice Sprow 
Patty Wiggins 
Margaret Wrenn 



May Qneen and mem bers of her Court . 
Welcome to Spring 



[Shirley MacPherson, Elinor 
. { McQueen, Jane Coates, Alice 
IStra&metz, Katherine Campbell. 



Aubrey Brown 
Grace Harris 
Bette Keim 
Mary Lehman 



kanafaska 

Joan Sabo 
Cora Scheetz 
Elaine Smith 
Madelyn Walters 



Jeannette Bailey 
Verna Bauer 
Edna Bixler 
Evelyn Ciotola 
Grace Erickson 
Esther Findlay 



MAYPOLE DANCE 
Patricia Hoxworth 
Jane Keffer 
Dorothy Kester 
Dorothy Kiler 
Betty Jo Naugle 



Jennie Phillips 
Jean Post 
Dorothy Tartala 
Mary Tincue 
Jane Wagner 



Barbara Browne 
Helen Danielly 
Margaret Jefferies 
Virginia Keller 



TARANTELLA 

Josephine LaCorte 
Alice Logan 
Mary Luchtemeyer 
Eleanor May 



SINGERS 
"I WOULD THAT MY LOVE" 



Fae Rantz 
Ann Tikiob 
Frances Williams 
Cecil Anne Wilson 



Virginia A. Keller, Dir. 
Alma Ash 
Odette Dunn 
Esther Findley 
Josephine Kidd 



Gladys Koci 
Katherine Marcerum 
Margaret Mathias 
Jacqueline McV'eagh 
Catherine Murray 



PART TWO 

AUTUMN 

Third I'oice: In autumn the road is a trumpet blast, and the tree is a ban- 
nered city. Ripe truits of the harvest beckon and call; the good grain 
is cut for the grinding. People trom over the sea have a share in the 
bounty. Nature returns to her rest, but her children are dancing and 
singing. Oh, the good harvest, the plenty, past of hunger and present of 
riches. The tree casts its dapple of red and gold shade, and gay are the 
dancers. Treading and spinning, and swift on the turn — dance tor the 
joy of the Harvest! 

Harvest Dance Finnish Folk Tunc 

Indian Summer Johns 

Southern Tap DanceC'Evalina") Arlcn 

Sunrise Arthur E. Johnstone 

Cowboy Dance Lloyd Shaw 

Weavily Wheat Powell 

PART THREE 

WINTER 

Fourth I oice: In winter the road is a white danger, and the tree is a strength 
and a promise. Silently the last leaf falls, and the carols ring out in the 
frost. The sluggard will Ireeze in his plodding. The wise ones will 
dance till the blood tingles, and reddens the cheeks and the lips of the 
dancers. Snow is a light-scattered blessing, and the wind catches breath 
into laughter. The tree lifts bare boughs to the heavens, and sings of the 
promise of life in its heart. 



Phyllis Bressler 
Florence Dorward 
Shirley Eberly 
Betty Erb 
Betty Farrington 
Jane Fisher 



Eugene Barth 
Lillian Brodie 
Stephen Clark 
Grace Conrad 
Herman Dash 



Jean Benjamin 
Nancy Boyle 
Willa Mae Brown 
Dorothy Buckner 
Jane Coates 



Marian Atchlet 
Mary Beldecos 
Autjna Dunlap 
Svea Erickson 
Martha Foster 

Michael Augusttn 
Eugene Barth 
Howard Blankman 
Thomas Brady 
Barbara Jane Brown 



THE SHINING DAYS OF 
Bertha Hagarty 
Anna Kapitula 
Virginia Keller 
Florence Nichols 
Patricia Ross 
Jeanne Sevison 

SISTER MONTHS 
Mary Louise Hoffman 
Lorana Kahn 
Robert Kello 
Martha Klinc 

INDIAN SUMMER 
Anita Walton, Director 
Doris Differ 
Margaret Dormer 
Miriam Good 
Mildred Hartman 
Elizabeth Hofman 

SUNRISE 
Jean Harter 
Joan Kutz 
Grace Rebuck 
Frances Rehmeyer 

WEAVILY WHEAT 
Stephen Clark 
Mary Jane Earon 
Charles Gross 
Estelle Harrop 
Lee Linn 
Ann Livingston 



Marjorie Saylor 
Alice Strickler 
Violet Tyson 
Marian Umholtz 
Virginia Wolfberg 

MAY 
Alice Strametz 
Ruth Tyler 
Patricia Wheeler 
Patty Wiggins 
Nancy Williams 
Enid Zimmer 



Lee Linn 
Ruth Miller 
Faith Reide.nbach 
Walter Rhoads 



Jean Mann 
Janice Markley 
Janet Norrjs 
Ruth Jane Rodgers 
Nancy Weiser 



Anna Schisler 
Nina Skidas 
Mary Worstall 
Gertrude Yohe 



Velma Ogline 
Alfred Reimschissel 
William Sapp 
Mary Louise Spangler 
Donald Stroud 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 235 



STORM KING 
Michael Augustin Walter Rhoads 

Ivis Baldwin Nancy Sherrard 

Herman Dash Donald Stroud 

Alma Miller Marion Watson 

Rosalind Kahn Mary Wilkin 



Barbara Baker 

Marjorie Burk 
Joan Coble 
Dorothy Davidson 
Jennie Dietzel 



CASTLES IN THE AIR 
Anna Douglass Bernice Hatch 

Patricia Eaker Florence Miller 

Jacqueline Farra Dorothy Short 

Joan Gearhart Shirley Snyder 

Ruth Groninger 



Phyllis Alspach 
Jeannette Bailey 
Nancy Emig 
Marie Greiman 
Marion Huebner 
Lucilla Jones 
Jane Mark 



DECK THE HALLS 
Lillian Mill 
Mary Miller 
Jane Montz 
Elizabeth Moore 
Nancy Simpers 
Frances Snyder 
Jane Strickler 



Ann Thomas 
Peggy Thompson 
Sarah Trostle 
Jean Troutman 
Eileen Urban 
Martha Lee Yeager 



Nancy Adams 
Bertha Bailey 
Elva Bailey 
Marie Cassel 
Jean Decker 
Margaret Dibert 



WELCOME TO SPRING 

Melba Dinkle 
Mildred Jones 
Paula Knauer 
Elizabeth Kolvick 
Mary Levergood 
Elaine Lowy 



Edith Masood 
Tamsen McCormick 
Gloria Nelson 
Marian Simcock 
Lois Webster 



Jessie Annan 
Patricia Becker 
Grace Bender 
Jean Benjamin 
Harriet Butler 
Doris Denholm 



PIPPA'S SONG 
Marguerite Haney, Director 



Evelyn Fair 
Ann Hackman 
Mary Hammer 
Evelyn Hartman 
Betty Hawkins 
Frances Hoot 



Blanche Lavin 
Margaret Mansley 
Marilyn Miller 
Suzanne Miller 
Doris Snyder 
Anita Walton 



THE CALL OF SPRING 



Thomas Brady 
Jean Clevenstine 
Mary Lou Hofmann 
Mildred Johnson 



Rose.mary Lantz 
Agnes Smith 
Dorothy Stultz 



ORCHESTRA 



Violins 
Mr. Gerlad Keenan 
Doris Ann Heim 
Marie Maren 
Ann Laushey 
Phyllis Frey 
Kathleen Smith 
Ruth Garman 
Irene Ford 
Mary Jane Engle 
Marilyn Krause 



Flutes 
Dorothy Smith 
Audrey Ruble 

Clarinets 
Harold Wright 
Alfred Reimschissel 

Bassoons 

Charlotte Gunther 
Kathryn Eppley 



Violas 
Louise Rohrbach 
Roberta Bram 

Cellos 

Jeanne McLaughlin 
Gladys Reichard 



Horns 
Richard Miller 
Mr. Arthur Jones 

Trumpets 
Mary Grabert 
Maybert Benner 



Basses 
Mr. Powell Middleton 
Evelyn Snyder 

Oboe 
Fern Rhoads 



Percussion 
Robert Rhoads 
Marjorie Gray 
Charles Lemmel 
Audna Dun lap 
Ednamarie Fogelsonger 



236 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



15 MARCH 1946 



Valkyrie Club Features the 'Windy 
Month ' with Spirit of Gay Nineties 

Hip! Hip! Hooray! • The in Recreation Hall, with music 
March wind doth blow. It blow- by the renowned Criterions. 
eth us the Valkyrie Show. Yes _ 

sir, folks, the month of March Grace Harris, Ann Clabby, and 
and the Valkyrie Show are prac- B. J. Oberdick are the "pen- 
tically synonymous! 



West Chester in the "Olden 
Days" will be portrayed in a 
"Gay Nineties Spirit," with songs, 
dances, skits, and tumbling. 
Our star-studded cast includes 
"Taffy" and Charlie Roach. 

The cluh will also arrange to 
sponsor a dance after the show, 



women" for the entertainment. 

This spectacular show is pre- 
sented annually by the Health 
Education department. 

Let us give you a "hot tip." 
The show, presented tomorrow, 
March 16, is a sure, safe gamble 
to a riotous night of fun, music, 
and laughter for only the going 




The first post war student performance was the Valkyrie 
show given in March. Charlie Roach was induced to take part 
in the production. His appearance was given an ovation by the 
men. 

President Swope sounds clarion call 

to carry on Work of Education so thoroughly begun 

FOR more than three generations, now, West Chester has been sending out 
to all parts of the country trained young men and women to make worth- 
while contributions toward the enrichment of our educational program and 
the uplift of all classes of our people. 

West Chester students and graduates have served their country heroically 
in times of national crises. A bronze plaque on the wall in the main entrance of 
the women's dormitory is a silent reminder that three of our men made the 
supreme sacrifice in World War I. During that war the Normal School provided 
facilities and training for a sizable R.O.T.C. unit. More than one thousand of 
our men and women served in World War II, many of whom attained high rank 
due to their outstanding efficiency and heroism. Twenty-eight of them gave 
their all and many others of them suffer from injuries and hardships incident to 
war. To one and all of our service men and women we are deeply grateful. 
Also, during World War II, the college provided, for a period of one year, main- 
tenance and training facilities for a large Army Postal School located on the 

campus. 

The Seventy-fifth Anniversary of this institution will arouse in the hearts of 
our more than 12,000 living graduates a renewed loyalty, pride, and appreciation 
for their alma mater. For three-quarters of a century West Chester has made a 
unique contribution toward the betterment of the citizenship of our state. For 
over three generations, it has exercised every influence at its command to make 
the best teachers that the ingenuity, the means, and the minds of men can produce. 
These teachers have gone forth to serve the children of the Commonwealth 
and the nation. Of our past record, we are humbly proud. // is a goodly heritage. 

We look forward to the future with new confidence and new faith, to increasing 
opportunities to serve youth. We trust that we may be able to face courageously 
the supreme test that is ours; namely, to prepare better teachers who, in turn, will 
help lift mankind to a higher level and consciousness of world citizenship. 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 237 



Wayne Hall Dorni 
Will Again Stage 
Traditional Follies 

After a five-year lapse, "The 
Wayne Hall Follies" will be 
presented on Saturday, March 
15. This production is unlike 
any other show produced on 
:ampus, and its variety of com- 
edy and music is a novelty in 
itself. This distinction is ad- 
mittedly an annual appraisal 
of the effort put forth by the 
masculine members of the col- 
lege. 

"The Wayne Hall Follies" 
made its first appearance in 
; 940, and since then the "Fol- 
lies", originated by John Gar- 
diner, class of '42, became a 
popular event. Probably one 
of the greatest contributing fac- 
tors to the success of this initial 
variety show, was the debut of 
Charlie Roach, who always adds 
to the general merriment of any 
musical production. 

Having met with such over- 
whelming success in its first at- 
tempt, the "Follies" was a 
"must" in 1941, then again in 
1942. Due to the war, produc- 
tion was discontinued, and this 
year's edition will revive this 
annual affair. 



Wayne Hall Follies Chorus 
Shapes Up For Traditional Show 



Claiming the boniest knees 
and the gosh-awfullest looking 
ankles you ever laid eyes on, 
that gorgeous creation — the 
Follies dancing chorus — opens 
the curtain Saturday night a 
week, March 15, on the 1947 
edition of the immortal Wayne 
Hall Follies. 

If you think for a minute that 
we are joking, just wait till you 
behold that "incomparable 
chorus" as it has been named. 
Incomparable! Whew — ! Any- 
thing that chorus compares to 
_ either living or dead — is 
purely intentional. For in- 
stance, if we told you how many 
knotty bulges graced the portly 
lower limbs of "Curly" Dave 
Williams between the knee and 
ankle, or how many times Joe 
Steiner's false unmentionables 
slipped to the floor — oh, tut 
wait — that would be giving 



away secrets. Speaking of un- 
mentionables, girls, Joe Jurich 
measures forty-six inches around 
the waste — cops — the waist, 
and is sanding out an SOS to the 
beef-trusters of Main Dorm to 
help him complete his Follies 
wardrobe. However, Jurich says, 
"In an extreme emergency, I can 
squeeze into a pair of twenty- 
sixes". Heavens, if that doesn't 
call ou't the riot squad, nothing 
will. 

Charlie Welsh and Mike Kes- 
dekian, the directors, are gradu- 
ally whipping the remainder of 
the cast into shape, while the 
cast is whipping them into a 
frenzy at the same time. At ev- 
«ry rehearsal, Charlie Roach 
wants to do every one of his 
thirty-two dance routines, and 
Six more guys want to try out 
for the bar-fly role. 



The Wayne Han Follies came our way and 
left some mighty neat memories. Condo- 
lences to those who missed it. Gad, what 
lovelies! 

Notes on the Follies . . . 

1. Things used to bolster up the front of 
the chorines' sweaters: dumbbells, grape- 
fruit (2), wads of paper, rolled socks, cotton 
balls, tennis balls, hot cross buns, oranges, 
potatoes, and a few of the lads wore the real 
McCoy. 

2. The Criterions sure jumped the gun on 
the chorus. Even before the chorus had lum- 
bered out of the wings for their second num- 
ber, the band had given them their cue to 
start kicking. Luckily, no one got hurt. 

3. JIM GARRITY was the real star of the 
show. His solo was nothing short of side- 
splitting. He even sang well with his mouth 
closed. 

4. All in all, the whole show was a huge 
success. Even MAXIE poured plenty of 
praises on the stars and their guests after 
the show. 

5. RAY "the crooner" SIGGINS wowed 
the females with his melodious renditions. 

6. VINCE HARVEY, singing without the 
aid of the mike or the pianist or the tune, 
reached all hearts and ears. 







IMRMMM 



Joe Jurich — Follies 
Chorus— "Pink Lady" 



'Follies' Becomes 
Reality As Cast 
Begins Rehearsals 

The Varsity Club will present 
Wayne Hall Fellies on Satur- 
day, March 15. This is the first 
year since the beginning of the 
war that this organization has 
functioned. 

Joseph Pollock, Charles Welsh, 
and Mesrop Kesd.ekian have 
written the comedy, and Earl 
French has composed an origin- 
al musical score which will be 
played by the Criterions. Dance 
numbers for the chorus have 
been" created by Ed Norris and 
Vince Presto. The comedy is 
ur:dev the direction of Charles 
Welsh and Mesrop Kesdekian. 

Since the element of surprise 
is important, the story and 
members of the cast have re- 
mained a secret. However, it 
has been announced that Char- 
lie Roach will have one of the 
leading parts. Rehearsals be- 
gan this week. 



238 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



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Fri., March 21. 1947 



The Follies . . . What Mattered! 

THERE was a great deal more to the 
Wayne Hall Follies than its pretentions 
had led us to believe. 

"'Without sentimentality and with- 
out heroics'' the show was dedicated to 
the seven gold-star soldiers who had 
previously taken part in the event. 

This was the glory of West Chester 
sung on its highest scale — It is not 
so much the things that are done here, 
but it is the people who do them that 
matter; our ivorth cannot be weighed 
in the sivift seconds of accomplishment, 
but its permanence is enriched in the 
memory of those who have claimed 
these successes. 

That is what the dedication meant 
to us. 

West Chester saw a different cast 
from that which had performed in 
1941. These were the boys who had 
left for war shortly after the last Wayne 
Hall Follies; they had come back to 
their books, their athletic contests, and 
the annual varsity show. 

And behind the jocularity of the 
entertainers, behind the slapstick 
comedy and laughter of the audience, 
was written the drama of West Chester 
tradition. 

It found its climax in the dedica- 
tion to those whom the "evening was 
made possible by their Supreme Sacri- 
fice." 







242 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



Friday, March 21. 1947 
QUAD ANGLES 



Dark Corners 



The All-College Party developed 
out of nowhere and was one of the largest 
and best affairs in the history of the school. 
The evening started out with a fine chapel 
program, highlighted by "Christopher Lynch" 
O'NEIL and SARA BISHOP making the op- 
posite sexes swoon in turn. 

Following this, the Aristocrats: played 
bridge; the Pennsylvania Dutch danced the 



Schottische; the sports square danced; ana 
the neophytes played games. 

The climax of the evening was the basket- 
ball game between the intra-mural league 
all-stars and the Strength of the faculty. The 
"Strength" consisted of such stalwarts as 
"Muscles" TREZISE, "Butterfly" GORDON, 
"Unconscious" BROWN, "Pretty Boy" MES- 
SIKOMER, "Stron g" STURTZEBECKER, 
"Slats" SYKES, "Atomic" MacTAVISH, with 
headgear, "Bullet Pass" KILLINGER, and 
"Wild Bull" BONDER. We found out these 
members of the faculty were good sports, and 
not too bad basketball players. 



18 APRIL 1947 



College Plans 
"Circuscenes" 
On A Big Scare 

The smell of sawdust and live 
elephants may be missing, and per- 
haps there won't be any pink lem- 
onade, but most of the thrills ol 
the "big top" will be right there 
when West Chester State Teachers 
College presents Its "Circuscenes" 
next week In Philips Memorial Aud- 
itorium. 

A revival of the annual pre-war 
Health Education Circus which the 
Health and Physical Education 
Department of the college staged 
regularly in Ehinger gymnasium 
In previous years, this year's event 
— first of the kind since the war — 
will take place on a slightly differ- 
ent but much more lavish scale. 



Carded for two nights, next Fri- 
day and Saturday, the colorful and 
exciting spectacle is being held lor 
the benefit of the Veterans' Me- 
morial Building. 

More than 250 Health and Phy- 
sical Education majors and staff 
members will perform in "Clrcus- 
cencs," presenting seventeen differ- 
ent acts demonstrating alll types of 
Physical education activities. Cos- 
tumed acrobats, tumblers, clowns, 
dancers, skaters, rope jumping and 
*tunt artists will be featured. 
There will be buffoons, barkers and 
pretty girls In tights. There will be 
a circus band, and balloons, and 
even a parade up and down the 
aisles before the start of the show. 

It will be the first time that an 
event of such size and scope has 
been staged in Philips Memorial 
Auditorium. Pre-war circuses at 
the college were always presented 
In the gymnasium and conducted 
In rings, like typical tent shows. 
It was a good idea, the Health Ed- 
ucation Department figured, ex- 



cept that there was too much go- 
ing on at one time; no one person 
could see it all. 

This time the pattern is chang- 
ed. The auditorium stage will be 
a single ring, in which the whole 
program of the show will be pre- 
sented, one act at a time. 

One of the specialties of the per- 
formance will be a brand new 
tumbling act, using a '^rampeline" 
exactly like those used In real cir- 
cuses. The "trampeline", !s a new 
apparatus and makes possible u va- 
riety of extremely showy and sen- 
sational acrobatics. 

Harry R. Allen, head of the col- 
lege Health and Physical Educa- 
tion Department, is supervising 
"Circuscenes," aided by a staff of 
faculty members which Includes 
Earle c. Waters, Miss Anne 
Schaub, Miss Muriel Leach, Mrs. 
Marjorie B. Moffett, Miss Myra 
Vfide, Charles Graham, Russell 
Sturzebecker, Emil ' Messlkomer, 
George A. Brown and others. 




rahon 



~ 1 ! e n ■ 



Till HEALTH AND PHYSICAL ED i DEPARTMENT 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 243 




*L 






C ^sCJ^6sC&^nj£4r~ 



^fs<e/)te</ by 
PfiYSiCRL EPVCRTiOH V£PA%mENT 

^MMM -"" I ■— »— — • - ■ — — , ~j_i z ; 1 — -. a 1^_^^___^_^^_ 

/Y1 tW£> 

PHILIPS MEHQftlBL #</D|TO/?jyM 







West Ch*sf*Kp***k' 






244 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SHOW- " CIRCUS SCENES 



Pre-Show Acts 

Parade . _ . . _ 

Pyramids - - _. — — 

Clown Ladder Pyramids 

Alexander's Ragtime Band _ 
Hypnotist Clowns _ ._ _. ._ 
1st Going thru College .. . 

Apparatus.-. ~ -. .. ._ . 

Weight Lifting - — - _ 
Clown Hand 3alance _ _ _ _ 
Modern Dance (3 people) — 
2nd Going thru College ... ._ 

Indian Clubs _ _. _ - 

3rd Going thru College _ _ 

Sauare Dance — 

Boxing . __._ 

Spiders— — 

Indian Rope Act _ 



4th Going thru College 

Giant Fire Cracker _ .. , _ 
Statues ___._._ _...._._ 

5th Going thru College . 

Modern Dance (18 girls).. ._ . 

Jump Rope __ _. „ ._ 

Clown Jump Rope - .- ... _ . - 
6th Going thru College 

Trampoline - -- - _. — 

Clown Indian Clubs _. _ _. _ 
7th Going thru College - . - 

Tumbling 

8th Going thru College — _ 
No, No, 1,000 times No _ _ 
Tap Dance, Buttermilk Skies 

9th Going thru College 

Finale __ __ — - - 



MUSIC 

Billboard 
Alexander's Rag Time Band 

Waltz (varied) 
Classical 
Managua Nicaragua 

Turkey In The Straw 
Coming Around the Mt. 



Act 

Parade 

Tap Dance 

.Apparatus 

Modern Dance 
Indian Clubs 

Square Dance 



Oriental Music Indian Rope Act 

Classical Music Modern Dance 

Dark Town Strutters Ball Jump Rope 

Waltz Music Medley Tumbling 

Buttermilk Sky Tap Dance 

Seems Like Old Times Finale 



LIST OF STUDENTS PART T CI PATING IN A DEMONSTRATION OF THE 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SHOW- " CIRCUS SCENES. " AT 
KENNETT SQUARE HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIONVILLE CONSOLIDATED 
SCHOOL APRIL 21 , 1947. 
MIXED DOUBLES APPARATUS 



John Kg 11 
Harold Heim 
Jacques Cutaiar 
Julius Kenos 
John Bubrick 
Grant Strohm 
Roger Care 
Quentin Gessner 
Ralph BaKer 

TRAMPOLINE 



Arvilla Wintormeyer 

Joyce Suter 
Kitty Erb 
Virginia Morris 
Polly Shupp 
Isbel Elicker 
Cora Sheetz 
Carolyn Seidell 
Marybelle Knouff 

TRIPLES 



Frank Null 

yjiarold Raf f ensperger 
Donald Smith 
Ray Mayrovitz 



Paul Rickenbach 
Warren Lowans 
Doris Eby 



Floyd Cash 
Frank Ellis 
Dan Thompkins 
William Bradford 
John Preston 
John Tasso 
Donald Haley 
Charles Clemens 
Norman Ecklund 
Vincent Sannotti 
Warren Haym&n 
Ed Norris 
David Pechman 
Marty Koons 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 245 



28 APRIL 1947 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 

SHOW SCORES AGAIN 



"Circuscenes," the show put cm 
by students of the Health Educa- 
tion Department of West Chester 
Teachers College, scored another 
iJt before a near-capacity audi- 
aux a: Philips Memorial Audito- 
rium Saturday evening. All of its 
many features were presented in 
flat style and without mishap. Ac- 
robatics on the trampoline, rope- 
tXi^pir.- dancers, Indian club ar 
li«*. square dancing and the an- 
uc» of a multitude of clowns were 
*Bx>ng highlights of the show. 

Earl C. Waters was in general 
ffearee of directing the show and 
w»« assisted by Miss Anne Schaub, 
la charge of seats and tickets; Geo. 
A. Brown, publicity and clowns: 
Mils Muriel Leach, pyramids; 
KUWell L. Sturzebecker, tumbling 
■a* tramboline; Mrs. Marjorie B. 
■JoOett, jump rope dance: Miss 
'J?"?' Wade, costumes: Charles 
~'™* ni ' st atues: Miss Ruth Alex- 
•anex. modern dances, and Mis 
I" 5 ' "msch, scenery and dec- 



Notes Backstage . . . 

1. Friday night's performance was very 
embarrassing to some of the male tumblers, 
especially when their black trousers began to 
give way at the seams, but being born actors 
they were quickly able to cover up. 

2. The stage crew was kept hustling in try- 
ing to do two things at once; i.e., one for 
Waters and one for Sturtzebecker. 

3. Charlie. Roach, as usual, gave a stel* 
lar performance, but said he was just a little 
nervous because his dancing teacher was in 
the audience. 

4. "Little Iodine" Graham, ably assisted 
"Whitey", "Smitty", Raffensberger and May- 
rovitz on the trampoline. 

5. Wednesday night rehearsal almost went 
over with a bang when what's his name — 
Ignuts — almost jumped out of the balcony 
without a net below. 

6. Larry "Van Johnson" Rollar has now 
been on the stage more times than Miss 
Schmidt with his freshman to senior job 
routine. 

7. We wonder about "Bud" Kline after 
seeing his heroine act. Seemed too good to 
be true. 

8. Yes, kidies, Doc York was there, too. 
HATS OFF TO THE HEALTH ED STAFF 

FOR THEIR EFFORT. 




JEST CLOWNIN' 



PHOTO BY LYVER 



West Chester Sees Health Ed 
Prowess As Jesters Go To Town 



The "Big Top" came to West 
Chester on April 25 and 26, when 
the Health and Physical Educa- 
tion department played "Ring- 
ling" to a capacity audience of 
students and visitors. 

Climaxing six weeks of prac- 
tice, Circuscenes, with three 
hundred participants, was one 
of the biggest hits to be effect- 
ed on the West Chester campus. 

Complete with clowns, mystics, 
dancing girls, swinging men, and 
acrobats, the students captured 
all the fun and gaity of the fes- 
tival. 

Things were zany from the 
outset when a yokel in the au- 
dience was politely bounced from 
the building for his pre-show 
shenanigans. 

Hollar hilariously portrayed 
the metamorphesis of a college 
student through successive 
stages of school life with a walk- 
on interspersed between acts. 
Cast as a deadpan stoic, he was 
among other things, a confused 
registrant, a green frosh, and, 
finally, a $2800 a year laborer 



after four years of college. 

Many remarked about the 
professionalism of the dancing 
which included a jumping rope 
routine, a tap specialty, several 
modern dance numbers and 
barn dancing sets complete with 
yodels. 

The acrobatic and trampoline 
work captured the breath of the 
spectators as well as the per- 
formers who defied all laws of 
gravity. 

One of the outstanding feat- 
ures was a group of men cover- 
ed with oil and aluminum coat- 
ing who depicted various sports 
giving the impression of silver 
statues. Running close to the 
statues, Ali Presto mystified all, 
and a frantic spectator reported 
that one of Presto's pigeons was 
so flattered that he made a 
personal visit to the applauding 
audience on Saturday night. 

Claude Rains, who was one 
of the onlookers, is said to have 
given the performers competi- 
tion in personal appeal during 
the Fridry casting. 



246 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




Indian Rope Act 
Harry Gilbert, Vince Presto, Ben Monticciolo, 
Milt Kalickman, George Mukalian, (Pidgeons) 





June 
Sturzebecker 
Trampoline 





Paul Rickenback, Doris Eby, Warren Lowans 




MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 247 




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248 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 




MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 249 




250 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



MEMO TO: 

Harry R. Allen, Chairman of Department 
Earle C. Waters, Director of Circuscenes 
Ruth Alexander 
George A. Brown 
Charles Graham 
Muriel leach 



April 29, 19^7 

Boil H. Messikomer 

Marjorie B. Moffett 

Anns Schaub 

Russell L. Sturzebecker 

Myra Wade 

Dorothy Tanisch 



Kay I take this means of congratulating all the members of the 
Staff and the students of the Health and Physical Education Department 
of the College for the fine show provided for the College and the 



community on Friday and Saturday evenings. Hot only did Circuscenes 
portray an abundance of excellent skills "but it was also interspersed 
with a lot of good humor and good laughs. 

The demonstration was a creditable 'achievement which justly de- 
serves the commendation of all who saw it. Please convey to the students 
of your Department my official and personal appreciation. 



Good Department . . . 
Good Work! 

THE Circuscenes is not to be evaluated 
for its content alone, but it is to be 
judged also as evidence of what a func- 
tioning organization can contribute to 
the college. 

Such a production, involving a tre- 
mendous cast who are engaged in so 
many other campus activities, requir- 
ed a highly cooperative effort to meet 
its demands. 

It ^s gratifyng to the faculty and 
students who spent months in prepa- 
ration for the performance to know 
that the school appreciated the calibre 
of their offerings. 

And it is equally gratifying for us 
to know that we have people at West 
Chester who are willing to do their 
share in the construction of a worth- 
while extra-curricular program. 



Sincerely yours, 

Charles S. Swope ' u 
President 




Russ Sturzebecker And Charlie Graham 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 251 



^^i^^e^l^S^ 7 yi -* fete* y^'c^j^ >& ^*-s 



252 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



17 JULY 1947 



Summer Session 
Gym Class Gives 
Chapel Program 

The regular summer session 
gym class, under the able dir- 
ection of Mr. Russell L- Sturze- 
becker, staged a chapel program 
on Wednesday, July 17, that was 
nothing short of a colossal pro- 
duction. It was one of the most 
enjoyable pieces of entertain- 
ment that your reporter has 
viewed In many a moon. "Sturt- 
zy's" entire gym class partici- 
pated and were directed by 
three of our student teachers; 
namely, Reid McCloskey, James 
Pollock, and Frank Stevenson. 

All types of apparatus were 
used by the muscle-men In per- 
forming group and Individual 
gymnastics. Russ Poole, Bob 
Helmuth, Wm. Reese, and Harry 
Gilbert were outstanding per- 
formers In their Individual spec- 
ialties. Many of the music stu- 



dents became weak-kneed at 
some of the acts (so we were 
told by Prof Milquetoast) . 

The audience will never forget 
"Buck" Gornish for his portray- 
al of a new "Health Ed" enroll- 
ing; or Peter Pederson, as Coach 
Klllinger, who assures "Buck" 
that he will be on the honor roll 
even before he begins classes in 
"ologies." Tom Hickman also 
gave a stellar performance as 
Dean of Instruction. 

Another highlight of the show 
was the clown acts, featuring 
Milt Kalickman, Vin« Presto, 
Jack Armstrong, John Hock, 
and Monty Monticciolo. Rumor 
has it that Rlngling, Barnum, 
and Bailey are trying to sign 
Milt and Presto for an unlim- 
ited engagement as soon as they 
graduate. 

The program was well-round- 
ed, with Paul B. Schwartz, of the 
Music Department, rendering 
several fine selections between 
acts. Naturally, the star of the 
show was our own Charles 
Roach, Dean of Internal Af- 
fairs, who brilliantly played the 
role of the doctor in one of the 
clown acts. After his last line. 



Charlie was persuaded to show 
us a few of his latest dance steps 
— namely, the Wayne Hall Bugs 
Hop, which he says Fred Astaire 
has been trying to steal. 

The members of the gym class 
are as follows: 

Jack Armstrong, Wm, Bailey, 
Byron DeWltt, John Dodds, Al- 
bert Gornish, Wm. Gottshall, 
Robert Grafton, Thomas Hick- 
man, J. Hock, Robert Helmuth, 
Eugene Honsberger, Ed John- 
son, Milt Kalickman, J. Lynch, 
Ben Monticciolo, Reid McClos- 
key, May Montoro, Don Parme- 
lee, Robert Poole, David Pech- 
man, Vln Presto, James Pol- 
lock, Walt Quay, Clarence Rude- 
gair, Wm. Reese, Vln Sannuti, 
Irvin Seymour, Doug Shepherd, 
Thomas Sproule, Wm. Smith, 
Cam Snowberger, Frank Steven- 
son, Herb Truxton, Ken Wal- 
ters, Robert Young. 

The reception that this show 
received can only indicate that 
the students and the faculty 
want many more programs of 
this type. To the Health Eds we 
take off our hats. To those who 
missed chapel that day — con- 
dolences. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION SHOW MENa GYMNASTIC CLASS 17 JULY 19^ 7 
INSTRUCTOR RUSSELL STURZEBECKER 
STUDENT DIRECTORS : NORMAN POLLOCK, REID MCCLOSKEY , FRANK STEVENSON 

1. INTRODUCTION- FRANCIS MONTORO .PIANO SELECTION PAUL SCHWARTZ 

SKIT- TOM HICKMAN, NORM PEDERSQJ 

2. GROUP PYRAMIDS— HERB TRUXTON 
B. CLOWN PYRAMIDS- JOHN HOCK 

*i. SKIT —CHANGING COURSES- TOM HICKMAN , NORM PEDERSEN 

5. SIDE HORSE EXERCISES- BILL REESE 

6. MUSIC INTERLUDE- PAUL SCHWARTZ 

7. HORSE VAULTING - BILL REESE 

8. CLOWN VAULTING - JOHN HOCK 

9. TUMBLING— VINCENT SANHUTTI 

10. PARALLEL BARS - EDPOOLE . HARRY GILBERT 

11. CLOWN TUMBLING-- JOHN HOCK 

12. HIGH ELEPHANT- ED POOLE , BILL REESE 

13. COMEDY ACT —MILT KALICKMAN , CHARLIE ROACH ( DEAN Or INTERNAL AFFAIRS ) 
I 1 *. FLNALE- ALL PERFORMERS ""* 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 253 



Friday, November 14, 1947 



Mr. Harry Allen's Death 
Is Sad Shock; Grieves 
Students and Faculty 

Instructor Was 
Department Head 
For Fifteen Years 

The many friends on campus 
and in the town, of Mr. Harry 
R. Allen, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Health and Physical 
Education, were sadly shocked 
by his sudden death on Wednes- 
day, November 12. Mr. Allen 
was stricken suddenly on Wed- 
nesday morning, as he was ar- 
riving on campus.- and died be- 
fore he could be taken to the 
hospital. 

Of this loss to the community, 
President" Swope stated, "I want 
to express my deepest-sympathy 
to Mr. Allen's family. All of his 
associates join me in their ap- 
preciation of. his unfailing- co- 
operation and his tireless efforts 
for the advancement of the 
work of his department. Espec- 
ially memorable, too, was his 
loyal interest in the college as 
a whole, throughout his many 
years of service. His. high 
standards and. complete sincer- 
ity have been and will remain 
an inspiration to'countless of his 
students and friends." 

Contributes Largely 

Under his direction the de- 
partment has advanced in a 
most commendable degree in 
scholastic- standards,- athletic 
accomplishments, the addition 
of new and up-to-date courses 
to the curriculum, 




Mr. HARRY R. ALLEN 

Mr. Allen had been connected 
with the College since 1930, and 
had planned to retire in about two 
years. 

Graduated from the Normal 
College in Indiana, and from Tem- 
ple University, in Philadelphia, 
with the degrees of B. S. and M 
S., he was recognized as a leader 
in his field. He had taught in the 
Philadelphia Normal School, and 
had served as Supervisor ot 
Health and Physical Education un- 
der the Department of Education 
in the State of Pennsylvania. Dur- 
ing the first World War, he serv- 
ed as Director of Recreation and 
Morale Officer. 



Dr. H. Lorenz 
Takes Position 
On Faculty 

Dr. Herbert A. Lorenz recently 
arrived on campus from Buck 
Hill Falls, Pennsylvania, to ac- 
cept a position as a member of 
the Health Education faculty. 

Dr. Lorenz, who received his 
doctor's degree at New York 
University in 1930, made, his 
.irst appearance on campus on 
November 20 to teach Mr. 
3turzebccker's former classes in 
Gym and Organization and Ad- 
ministration. A committee of 
three, consisting of Mr. Waters. 
chairman; Miss Schaub, and 
Mr. Sturzebecker, has tempor- 
arily been appointed to take 
over the teaching and super- 
vision program of the late Mr. 
Allen. 

Dr. Lorenz studied at the 
University of Kansas, Columbia 
University, and N.Y.U. He has 
held teaching positions at Suf- 
Seld, Conn.; University of Kan- 
sas; Kansas State Agricultural 
College; Bernard School for 
Boys, N. Y.; East Stroudsburg 
State Teachers College; Univer- 
sity of Rochester; and Lafay- 
ette College. 

In World War I he served in 
the armed forces as a captain 
and was awarded the Purple 
Heart and five battle stars. 

A captain in the Infantry in 
World War II, he was attached 
to the Special Service Athletics 
Branch, Washington, D. C, in 
1942; the Persian Gulf Com- 
mand in 1942-43; the Engineer- 
ing School, Fort Belvoir, Va., ir 
1943-45. 



Planning for new health & physical education faciltites 

With the loss of the services of Mr. Harry R. Allen President Swope revealed the urgency of meeting a proposal for the 
critically needed expansion of the health and physical education facilities. He appointed the author and Mr. Thomas Pitt, 
Superintendent of Building and Grounds to jointly prepare both plans for the physical structure as well as all equipment and 
supplies for its effective use. (See college history for chronological planning with concomitant problems). 



254 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Seated: Miss Wade, Miss Wiley, Miss Schaub, 

Mr. Waters, Mr. Sturzebecker, Miss Leach, Miss Haag. 

Standing: Dr. Lorenz, Mr. Graham, Miss Yanisch, Mr. Yohe 



College Gymnasts 
To Give Exhibition 

The Olympic Club, one of the 
oldest campus organizations, 
will present a gymnastic exhibi- 
tion on Friday, January 9, dur- 
ing the regular chapel period, as 
a prelude to the gym meet with 
the University of Delaware on 
January 10, at 2:30 - *p. m., in 
Ehinger Gymnasium. 

Members of the varsity gym 
team comprise the largest por- 
tion of the Olympic Club mem- 
bership. 



Rocco t Gigiante, sophomore 
gym team manager, is in charge 
of Friday's exhibition which will 
be performed by a team com- 
posed of Don" Haley, captain of 
the gym team, Don Smith, Har- 
old Raffensberger, Paul Schickle, 
John Tasso, Frank Ellis. Don 
Thompkins, John -Kell, Bill 
Clemens, and Earl Williams. 

In addition to the work per- 
formed by the men on the high 
horizontal bar, mats, parallels, 
and trampoline, several girls 
from the. Health Education De- 
partment will present a tumb- 
ling exhibition. ■ 




1947-1948 Gym Team 

(1st. row) John Kell, Dan Thompkins, Don Smith, Harold Raffensberger, Frank Ellis, Don Williams. 

(2nd. row) Coach R. Sturzebecker, Norm Eckland, Charles Clemens, Francis Monti, 

Grant Strohm, Manager Rocco Gigante, Paul Schickel, Captain Don Haley; (absent) 



MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 255 



5 MARCH 1948 



Seasoned Actors, Actresses 
Star in 'Wayne Hall Follies' 



This year's edition of - the 
Wayne Hall Follies should strike 
a new note in the field of mus- 
ical comedy. The theme is pol- 
itics, and not without humor. 

The cast is composed of sea- 
soned actors and actresses who 
set their seasoning in last year's 
show. Naturally, Charlie Roach 
will be starred in the lead and 
will be cast in the role of "Dilly", 
the people's choice for mayor. 

His opponent and the incum- 
bent mayor, "Barney", is Jack 
Armstrong of the Seaside 
Heights Open Air Playhouse. 
Tim Garrity will play the part 
of Mayor Barney's beautiful, but 
incompetent, secretary. 

Bob Emberger is cast as "Mrs. 
Barnev" and is the real power 
behind the scene. 

Bob Lisse will manage the 
political affairs of Mayor Barney 
under the cognomen of "Throt- 
tle * Bottom," " and " Ben Montic- 
ciclo will steer the political 
wheel of the people's choice, 



"Dilly". 

Probably what is most unique 
about the Follies this year is the 
fact that it has a plot, breaking 
all precedent in Follies' history. 

The chorines, whose beauty 
and precision are rivaled only 
by the Rockettes, have been re- 
hearsing under the watchful 
eye of director Vince Presto. 
The routines are so intricate 
that Chuck Kauffman and Pete 
Mirsch keep their first aid kits 
on hand for every rehearsal. 

Dave Heck is musical director 
and has arranged most of the 
music for the show. He has al- 
so written a number entitled 
"Derangement", which will be 
used in the night club scene. 

Earl French is assisting Heck 
and has written special lyrics 
for some of the numbers. Sam 
Drizin will "emcee" the second 
act. 

Oh, yes! Joe Collins and Jake 
Gaffney wrote the show and are 
directing it. 



17 MARCH 1948 



Varsity Club's Annual Show 
Makes Stage Debut Tonight 



The Varsity Club will present 
Wayne Hall Follies on Friday 
and Saturday evenings, at 8:15 
p. m., in the Philips Memorial 
Auditorium. 

Jake Gaffney and Joe Collins 
wrote the script for this year's 
Follies edition and are directing 
the show. 

With the exception of the war 
years, the Varsity Club has pre- 
sented the Follies for a number 
of years. 

This year the Follies will fol- 
low a political plot which evolves 
about two political figures, 
"Mayor Barney" and "Dilly". 
Jack Armstrong and Charlie 
Roach play the leading parts, 
respectively. "Dilly" has a speech 
prepared that will shock the 
nation. 

Penelope, the Mayor's wife, 
Bob Emberger in campus life, 
will give the first presentation 
of the "Hew Look for '49". 

Robert Lisse and Ben Mon- 



ticciolo play the roles of the two 
compaign managers, "Throttle- 
Bottom" and "Benny Bubble". 

Marty Koons and Bob Keys 
will perform their famous 
"Apache Dance". 

With the cooperation of the 
members of the cast, the direct- 
ors have managed to maintain 
an air of secrecy concerning the 
Follies. 

The Follies routines were dir- 
ected by Vince Presto; Chuck 
Kauffman and Pete Mirsch are 
acting as stage prompters. 

Music for the show has been 
arranged by Dave Heck, who is 
acting as musical director. Earl 
French is his assistant. 



Weet th 



Fri., Mar. 5, 1948 

Great Expectations 

ANOTHER presentation of the an- 
nual "Wayne Hall Follies" production 
will soon be here and we are all wait- 
ing with anticipation for a great show. 

.It is a pleasure to see a perform- 
ance, written, directed, produced, and 
having a cast of such cooperative, in- 
experienced members. Not often such 
a task is undertaken and very seldom 
does it become a raging success. 

The "Follies" of the past have be- 
come milestones of history in the ac- 
tivities of the college and this year's 
production will deliver even more rec- 
ognition to the ability, ingenuity, and 
cooperation of the members of the Var- 
sity Glub. 

According to tentative plans, im- 
provised chorus girls will add rhythm 
and humor to the plot of the entertain- 
ment, while specialty acts will contribz 
ute to the evening 's festivities. 

Everyone is awaiting the so-called 
"most spectacular show in town" or 
"The 1948 Wayne Hall Follies". 

Arrangements for tickets can be 
made with any Varsity Club member. 
It is bound to be good — at least we 
have great expectations. 

See you at the "Follies" ! 
J4op over to 

HOPPY'S 

PURPLE and GOLD 



te QCin^ 



AT MAXCY'S 

RAINBOW ROOM 



256 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



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MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 257 



1949 "Follies" 
Rehearse For 
Annual Revue 

'Cold Shoulders' 
To Be Presented 
Friday, March 11 

The Varsity Club has sent the 
1949 version of the "Wayne Hall 
Follies" into production with 
the appearance of rehearsals for 
Cold Shoulders, a musical revue 
to end all musical revues. 

It will make its grande emer- 
gence from the meat-grinder on 
Friday night, March 11, and will 
be produced again the following 
evening if the meat doesn't 
spoil in the meantime. 

The show is being ably di- 
verted from chaos by director 
Sam Cozzi, a pre-war student 
who just couldn't stay away. 

Sam appeared in the 1940 and 
1941 "Follies" and then went 
into the service where he was a 
First Lieutenant in Special Ser- 
vices. He returned to the cam- 
pus this September. 

In the states, he has done 
radio work in Atlantic City, 
Florida, New Orleans, and Los 
Angeles. 

Jack McNeil, Howie Stringer, 
and Norm Waldman are direct- 
ing the choruses, and "Buzzie" 
Seymour is Committee Chair- 
man. 



Wayne Hall Boys' Cold Shoulders 
Will Shine As Hot Chorus Lines 
Melts Frost In Philips Auditorium 

Cozzi, McNeil and Stringer 
Cooperate on Syren's Script 
For Hilarious Farce Comedy 

The male students of the college will present the annual 
Wayne Hall Follies tonight and tomorrow night, March 11 and 12, 
in the Philips Memorial Auditorium. Curtain time for both per- 
formances of "Cold Shoulders", the title chosen for the 1949 pro- 
duction, will be 8:00 p. m. 

Sponsored each year by the Varsity Club, the Follies are under 

the general direction of Sam Cozzi, with Jack McNeil and Howard 
Stringer in charge of the chorus lines. 

The script for "Cold Shoulders" was written by Ed Syren, 
senior Secondary student. 

Music for the show will be supplied by the Criterions, under the 



leadership of Earl Ward, junior 
Music student. The orchestral 
arrangements, as well as several 
original musical selections com- 
posed specifically for "Cold 
Shoulders", were written by 
Arlen Saylor, while Jack Mc- 
Neil has written the original 
ijrics used in the Follies. 

This year's production will 
introduce as its stars Pete Fin- 
ley, Sam Drizen and Vince Har- 
>ey,"plus the perennial favorite, 
Charlie Roach. 

Other Members Star 

Other members of the cast 
include Wayne Schneider, Jim 
Hollingsworth, Louis Calagrico, 
J. Murphy, Vincent DeSanctis, 
and Charles Edwards. 



Specialty acts will be perform- 
ed by Joe McGinley, Bill Di- 
Campli, Fred Boas, Warren In- 
lander, Lennic Kello, Ray Sig- 
gins, Jack McNeil, and Boris 
Browse. 

'Collegians' to Sing 

The Collegians, including Ar- 
len Saylor, Bruce Coulter, Wal- 
ter Winter, and Fred' Pfleiger, 
are down tor a barber shop quar- 
tet. 

Howie Stringer and George 
Mukalian are directing one of 
the two dancing choruses. It 
will i.iclude Joseph Quaglio, 
Roland Hughes, Jacic O'Donnell, 
iill Mackrides, Ed Goldberg, 
Dave Williams, Bill Foltz, El- 
wood McKenzie, Clement Van 
Wyck, Herbert McCUntock. 





FOLLIES' DIRECTORS . . . left to right . . . Earl Ward. Sam Drizin. Sam Cozzi. 
Ed Syren, Howie Stringer. Jack McNeil. 



258 MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 



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MR. HARRY R. ALLEN 259 



Health Education 
Girls Score Hit 
In College Show 

28 MARCH 1949 

The "Valkyrie srro\*" presented 
by the girls of the Health Educa- 
tion Department of the Sta.e 
Teachers College scored a hit be- 
fore a large audience that filled 
the Philips Memorial Auditorium 
on Saturday evening. 

The musical centered about four 
college girls who journey to New 
York City in search of ideas for 
their own show. Needless to say, 
their venture proved a highly suc- 
cessful one and the students re- 
turn with ideas galore. 

Saturday night's performance 
ran the gamut from tumbling acts 
to tap dancing and even a take-off 
on "Truth or Consequences." 

One of the highlights of the 
show was the duplication of the 
popular New York radio show. A: 
this time, two people were called 
from the audience to take part. By 
some odd "coincidence" the couple 
selected happened to be Mr. and 
Mrs. B. Herr, parents of Bernice 
Herr, one of the participants in 
the show. They were both given 
a word association test on the as- 
sumption that since they were mar- 
ried for such a long time, their 



minds snould run aiong mo same 
channels. Mr. Herr bore' the brunl 
of the consequences. Each time he 
failed to answer the same as his 
wife he was sprayed with water 
much to the c'elight of the audi- 
ence. 

"Patys' Gymnasium", a number 
which consisted of a highly com- 
plicated jump rope routine wot) 
the approval of the patrons. Eight 
girls performed simultaneously in- 
tricate maneuvers with the aid oi 
the jumping rope. 

One of the outstanding portions 
of the entire show consisted of a 
tumbling act directed by Glenna 
Schultz, a student in the Health 
Education curriculum. The audi- 
ence responded enthusiastically as 
the girls displayed perfect coor- 
dination and skill. 

Very effective was the Indian 
Club routine. The clubs sprayed 
with a silver dust, gave a beauti- 
ful flashing effect as they came 
under the focus of a huge purple 
light that flooded the stage. 

Various types of dancing were 
also featured as a part of the show 
A soft shoe dance, a sophisticated 
tap performed to. "Tea for Two", 
a modern dance and a waltz clog 
were all in the musical revue. 



Saturday nignt marKea the first 
time that the new Valkyrie song 
was heard. This was "We Want to 
Chase Your Blues Away," written 
especially for the group by a for- 
mer student, John Potpinko. 

Dorothy DePew, junior Health 
Education student, acted as gen- 
eral chairman of the show, while 
Miss Anne Schaub, an instructor 
in the Health Education Depart- 
ment, was the advisor to the